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Can stress and elevated emotion alone cause a slow bleed to the brain?

Limited research on this subject. Any insights appreciated.
Reply 1
so, I'm a second year undergrad specialising in neuroscience, by no means an expert but this would be my perspective: to get a bleed on the brain, you'd have to have a weakness in one of the blood vessels that then ruptures and isn't healed. Theoretically, it is possible that chronic elevated stress would induce high blood pressure, which weakens the vessel walls over time. However, you'd also have to account for the pressure affecting release - for a slow bleed, you need the blood to not be under high pressure or under pressure that grows over time. Stress-induced high blood pressure would rather be significantly more likely to result in a haemorrhage than a slow bleed, especially if from an artery. There's also the fact that usually, in a healthy individual, any tear in the vessel wall would result in clot formation to stop you from bleeding out.

From a quick search on slow bleeds, the first thing that came up is a subdural haematoma in which blood slowly pools in the space between the brain and the skull. However, this is following injury to the vessels from head trauma, mainly in the elderly who have weaker vessels and those on blood-thinning medication who would not form blood clots as easily. So, it is maybe possible that in those populations, stress/emotion could result in damage to the vessel walls and so a slow bleed? But from what I can see, it doesn't seem that likely that it can act alone without any other interfering factors
Reply 2
Original post by cyberhex
so, I'm a second year undergrad specialising in neuroscience, by no means an expert but this would be my perspective: to get a bleed on the brain, you'd have to have a weakness in one of the blood vessels that then ruptures and isn't healed. Theoretically, it is possible that chronic elevated stress would induce high blood pressure, which weakens the vessel walls over time. However, you'd also have to account for the pressure affecting release - for a slow bleed, you need the blood to not be under high pressure or under pressure that grows over time. Stress-induced high blood pressure would rather be significantly more likely to result in a haemorrhage than a slow bleed, especially if from an artery. There's also the fact that usually, in a healthy individual, any tear in the vessel wall would result in clot formation to stop you from bleeding out.
From a quick search on slow bleeds, the first thing that came up is a subdural haematoma in which blood slowly pools in the space between the brain and the skull. However, this is following injury to the vessels from head trauma, mainly in the elderly who have weaker vessels and those on blood-thinning medication who would not form blood clots as easily. So, it is maybe possible that in those populations, stress/emotion could result in damage to the vessel walls and so a slow bleed? But from what I can see, it doesn't seem that likely that it can act alone without any other interfering factors

Thank you so much this is really helpful.

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