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Biomedical science vs solicitor

Okay so I was thinking of becoming a solicitor but now I'm leaning more towards biomedical science as i feel like it would be way more interesting than law I'm aware I'll probs get paid less but it would still provide me with a decent salary anyway right? Also another concern of mine is that after I finish a biomedical science degree will I need to get a masters to be able to work in a hospital?
Original post by D17Hio
Okay so I was thinking of becoming a solicitor but now I'm leaning more towards biomedical science as i feel like it would be way more interesting than law I'm aware I'll probs get paid less but it would still provide me with a decent salary anyway right? Also another concern of mine is that after I finish a biomedical science degree will I need to get a masters to be able to work in a hospital?

Hi!

I'm a biomedical scientist in the NHS. The salary was not great as a biomedical scientist (£28,000 starting) until you have completed extra certifications (specialist portfolio -> £35,000-40,000) and on the top end (higher specialist diploma -> £43,000-50,000) (all of these certificates must be gained on top of your bachelor's degree in the laboratory and take a few years to get).

If you do do this and only take one thing from this and decide to do biomedical science - please make sure your degree is IBMS accredited or it is impossible to get in as a biomedical scientist in the UK. You do not require a Masters, however a Bachelors is required - the key is for the IBMS accreditation from the Uni. I have friends paying out of their own pocket even though they did a biomedical degree Masters so they can get the correct type of degree. I personally only did an IBMS accredited bachelors.

The typical route for people is to finish their IBMS accredited degree, start work as a Medical lab assistant (band 2 salary) in specimen reception get promoted to associate practitioner in the lab (band 4 salary) and then get promoted to or obtain a trainee biomedical scientist spot then complete their IBMS generic portfolio (approx 6 months - 1 year to complete) in the lab to get the full registration into a biomedical scientist (band 5 = £28,000 starting). There is also now a newer 4 year degree apprenticeship which is IBMS accredited, where you get paid for working in the lab but also study at uni at the same time (you get a day off in the week to go to uni).

Another alternative to BMS and similar in nature that is decent paying is you could do a biomedical degree and after that going through the STP programme going in as a clinical scientist by the NHS - you get to do a Masters here and pays after the 2 year training is a salary of approx £50,000. This programme is quite hard to get into though.

Overall - you can make a career from biomedical science, but it definitely is not as lucrative as a solicitor.

Regardless, my best advice to you is that it might be a good idea to do work experience with both a solicitor and a biomedical scientist so you get an idea of what day-to-day work is like and ask them about the role and salary directly.

This should help clear stuff up! Best of luck!
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 2
Original post by Vermillionred
Hi!
I'm a biomedical scientist in the NHS. The salary was not great as a biomedical scientist (£28,000 starting) until you have completed extra certifications (specialist portfolio -> £35,000-40,000) and on the top end (higher specialist diploma -> £43,000-50,000) (all of these certificates must be gained on top of your bachelor's degree in the laboratory and take a few years to get).
If you do do this and only take one thing from this and decide to do biomedical science - please make sure your degree is IBMS accredited or it is impossible to get in as a biomedical scientist in the UK. You do not require a Masters, however a Bachelors is required - the key is for the IBMS accreditation from the Uni. I have friends paying out of their own pocket even though they did a biomedical degree Masters so they can get the correct type of degree. I personally only did an IBMS accredited bachelors.
The typical route for people is to finish their IBMS accredited degree, start work as a Medical lab assistant (band 2 salary) in specimen reception get promoted to associate practitioner in the lab (band 4 salary) and then get promoted to or obtain a trainee biomedical scientist spot then complete their IBMS generic portfolio (approx 6 months - 1 year to complete) in the lab to get the full registration into a biomedical scientist (band 5 = £28,000 starting). There is also now a newer 4 year degree apprenticeship which is IBMS accredited, where you get paid for working in the lab but also study at uni at the same time (you get a day off in the week to go to uni).
Another alternative to BMS and similar in nature that is decent paying is you could do a biomedical degree and after that going through the STP programme going in as a clinical scientist by the NHS - you get to do a Masters here and pays after the 2 year training is a salary of approx £50,000. This programme is quite hard to get into though.
Overall - you can make a career from biomedical science, but it definitely is not as lucrative as a solicitor.
Regardless, my best advice to you is that it might be a good idea to do work experience with both a solicitor and a biomedical scientist so you get an idea of what day-to-day work is like and ask them about the role and salary directly.
This should help clear stuff up! Best of luck!

Do u genuinely enjoy your job?
Original post by D17Hio
Do u genuinely enjoy your job?

Some things were fun, but mostly no. I am switching to medicine - I have an offer and am starting 2024 entry. But I do know people who do like it there, I think it is likely many will friends will happily retire there. I think I might have enjoyed haematology department more, but the science aspect of biochemistry department and working with lots of people I definitely liked.

Overall I couldn't see myself staying as a BMS long term, I would have likely tried to get into the STP clinical scientist programme had I not got into medicine.

Only way to find out is to go visit yourself, different people have different tastes. If I were you I would definitely get work experience in both - even if only 1 day in both.
(edited 1 month ago)

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