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Advice on Biology Edinburgh VS Manchester

Hello all,
I'm an A-level student who received offer from both Manchester and Edinburgh for Biology
Con
Manchester: AAA
Edinburgh: A*AA
It is a bit hard for me to decide, as Edinburgh seems to have a higher reputation compared to Manchester. But I also need to pay one more year of international student tuition fees, as Edinburgh is a four-year program.
The thing is, I am worried that as a biology student, it will be very hard to find a job after graduation. Therefore, I am wondering if I can get any advice about employment and also about the intern job opportunities I can pursue during university.
Reply 1
Original post by RoseT5
Hello all,
I'm an A-level student who received offer from both Manchester and Edinburgh for Biology
Con
Manchester: AAA
Edinburgh: A*AA
It is a bit hard for me to decide, as Edinburgh seems to have a higher reputation compared to Manchester. But I also need to pay one more year of international student tuition fees, as Edinburgh is a four-year program.
The thing is, I am worried that as a biology student, it will be very hard to find a job after graduation. Therefore, I am wondering if I can get any advice about employment and also about the intern job opportunities I can pursue during university.

Hi I’m in a very similar situation (have biomed offers for edi and manchester, don’t know which to firm)-

But rn I might be leaning towards Edinburgh due to its more flexible course structure- since it’s four years you can take many different optional modules which is helpful for someone like me who wants to go into a more interdisciplinary field (bioinformatics). But ofc that is still an extra year over Manchester + extra fees so I understand that it’s a hard decision to make lol
Reply 2
'Reputation' - however you think you can measure this - counts for nothing unless you actually enjoy the course you are studying. For this reason, you need to look carefully at the range of optional units available within each year of the course and think carefully about what you would choose if you went there.

Biology graduates are very employable as the degree is so wide and takes in so many different science areas - so you are not going to have a problem getting a job once you graduate. What will help you is having a degree with any sort of work-expérience placement - this adds to your graduate CV and makes you more attractive to all employers.
Reply 3
Original post by Emiliaur
Hi I’m in a very similar situation (have biomed offers for edi and manchester, don’t know which to firm)-
But rn I might be leaning towards Edinburgh due to its more flexible course structure- since it’s four years you can take many different optional modules which is helpful for someone like me who wants to go into a more interdisciplinary field (bioinformatics). But ofc that is still an extra year over Manchester + extra fees so I understand that it’s a hard decision to make lol

There is also another concern about safety problems. Based on the comments of my friends who are currently in Edinburgh and Manchester, they all said Edinburgh would be safer. So I probably will prefer Edinburgh. The longer the course, it would also be beneficial to have enough time to find job opportunities.
Original post by RoseT5
Hello all,
I'm an A-level student who received offer from both Manchester and Edinburgh for Biology
Con
Manchester: AAA
Edinburgh: A*AA
It is a bit hard for me to decide, as Edinburgh seems to have a higher reputation compared to Manchester. But I also need to pay one more year of international student tuition fees, as Edinburgh is a four-year program.
The thing is, I am worried that as a biology student, it will be very hard to find a job after graduation. Therefore, I am wondering if I can get any advice about employment and also about the intern job opportunities I can pursue during university.

I graduated from St Andrews in biology. you are right about the less than perfect graduate prospects.

Manchester has essentially as good reputation as Edinburgh, it's splitting hairs really. but i can vouch for the 4 year degree structure
Original post by McGinger
'Reputation' - however you think you can measure this - counts for nothing unless you actually enjoy the course you are studying. For this reason, you need to look carefully at the range of optional units available within each year of the course and think carefully about what you would choose if you went there.
Biology graduates are very employable as the degree is so wide and takes in so many different science areas - so you are not going to have a problem getting a job once you graduate. What will help you is having a degree with any sort of work-expérience placement - this adds to your graduate CV and makes you more attractive to all employers.
'Biology graduates are very employable as the degree is so wide and takes in so many different science areas - so you are not going to have a problem getting a job once you graduate. What will help you is having a degree with any sort of work-expérience placement - this adds to your graduate CV and makes you more attractive to all employers.'

as a biology grad myself - the first sentence is completely wrong, the second sentence is completely right. although i'd specify white collar work experience rather than lab based stuff
Reply 6
Congrats on your offers! I get the dilemma between reputation and costs. For job prospects, biology opens up a lot of doors, so I wouldn't stress too much. Just go with what feels right for you!

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