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confused about joint honours

Is a Maths AND something else course better than a Maths WITH something course?
which one has more maths?
and will i be able to do a maths postgrad after both?
Original post by Anonymous
Is a Maths AND something else course better than a Maths WITH something course?
which one has more maths?
and will i be able to do a maths postgrad after both?

Generally, 'and' courses are 50/50, whereas 'with' courses are 75/25 or some other similar ratio.

Maths with [...] courses are generally fine for postgraduate study; Maths and [...] courses are usually okay, but they may try be better for one type of Maths, e.g. Maths and Computer Science may be better for pure and discrete Maths, whereas Maths and Physics may be better for applied Maths. It's rarer to find Maths and [...] courses that aren't both STEM.

If you're looking at any particular course, the key thing you should be looking out for is its accreditation. This determines its suitability for postgraduate study.
Original post by Anonymous
Is a Maths AND something else course better than a Maths WITH something course?
which one has more maths?
and will i be able to do a maths postgrad after both?

It depends whether the second course is mutually supporting of the first, in a direction/career path you want to take, or whether it is contrasting. Maths and Physics is a great choice if your interests lie between the two and you are sure you want to progress in a crossover area. Taking Maths and Physics and wanting to go on to a Masters in something that uses both, is fine.

The issues come when you do a joint degree where the subjects are contrasting, Maths and History of Art, to take an extreme example. At the end of that degree, you will have done 50% of the Maths and 50% of the HoA than anyone graduating with a single degree in either of those subjects. That has to make you less competitive for academic progression. Employers will be less concerned though.

There's no basic advantage in doing a joint degree - if there was, they'd be the standard.
Reply 3
Original post by threeportdrift
It depends whether the second course is mutually supporting of the first, in a direction/career path you want to take, or whether it is contrasting. Maths and Physics is a great choice if your interests lie between the two and you are sure you want to progress in a crossover area. Taking Maths and Physics and wanting to go on to a Masters in something that uses both, is fine.
The issues come when you do a joint degree where the subjects are contrasting, Maths and History of Art, to take an extreme example. At the end of that degree, you will have done 50% of the Maths and 50% of the HoA than anyone graduating with a single degree in either of those subjects. That has to make you less competitive for academic progression. Employers will be less concerned though.
There's no basic advantage in doing a joint degree - if there was, they'd be the standard.

so what about something like economics and economic history for an economics type of career path?
Reply 4
Original post by melancollege
Generally, 'and' courses are 50/50, whereas 'with' courses are 75/25 or some other similar ratio.
Maths with [...] courses are generally fine for postgraduate study; Maths and [...] courses are usually okay, but they may try be better for one type of Maths, e.g. Maths and Computer Science may be better for pure and discrete Maths, whereas Maths and Physics may be better for applied Maths. It's rarer to find Maths and [...] courses that aren't both STEM.
If you're looking at any particular course, the key thing you should be looking out for is its accreditation. This determines its suitability for postgraduate study.

thx for the advice :smile:
Original post by Anonymous
so what about something like economics and economic history for an economics type of career path?

Yes, that's a strong combination. Might not be the most competitive for more quant/maths heavy roles, but there's plenty more to economics than that.
Reply 6
Original post by threeportdrift
Yes, that's a strong combination. Might not be the most competitive for more quant/maths heavy roles, but there's plenty more to economics than that.

great, thanks

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