The Student Room Group
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London

Jobs with LSE Econ/Econ & Maths

I know these degrees probably aren't quantitative enough for a quant masters and therefore quant research etc but I'm wondering what other mathsy jobs can I get which pay well? Also will Econ & Maths be significantly better than Econ? I'm worried about transferring to the joint honours because its less competitive so might be worth less?
Original post by Anonymous
I know these degrees probably aren't quantitative enough for a quant masters and therefore quant research etc but I'm wondering what other mathsy jobs can I get which pay well? Also will Econ & Maths be significantly better than Econ? I'm worried about transferring to the joint honours because its less competitive so might be worth less?

Not entirely sure what you mean by not quantitative enough. See the following MSc in Quantitative Finance for example:
https://www.alliancembs.manchester.ac.uk/study/masters/msc-quantitative-finance/entry-requirements/#course-profile
https://www.bayes.city.ac.uk/study/masters/courses/quantitative-finance#entry-requirements
https://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/quantitativefinance/#entryrequirements
https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/quantitativefinance/#entryrequirements

https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/msc-mathematical-and-computational-finance (this explicitly requires maths and it's in computational finance)

Also, even if the above don't fit your criteria, you can look into the CQF qualification which typically suit people with a maths based background: https://www.cqf.com/about-cqf/program-structure/cqf-qualification

If you want something in academia, then that's slightly different.

In terms of maths related jobs, the ones that would involve anything more difficult than A Level Maths typically are in:

Mathematician and statician

Economist and MORSE - more in mathematical modelling than anything else

Physicist

Engineering - at least in theory; Electrical and Electronic Engineering is probably the most mathematical

Data related roles in tech e.g. data analyst, data science

Quantitative analyst

Actuarial science

From the above, I would say you would have problems becoming a physicist and mathematician with a degree in economics. You might get away with doing a MSc in Physics with the joint maths degree, but you would need to check e.g.
https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/physics-msc
https://courses.leeds.ac.uk/i252/physics-msc
https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/msc-mathematical-and-theoretical-physics
https://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/postgraduate/degrees/index.php?r=site/view&edition=2024&id=818
https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studying-here/postgraduate/physics/msc-physics-by-research/

I don't know many mathsy job that pays well. They usually depend less on your degree and more on your experience, job performance, and skills.
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London
The ‘respect’ thing is silly imo. I had the same attitude but upon landing at lse i realised most econ/finance students are very cookie cutter. Do you think that Blackstone will look at Econ and think ‘wow must be much better than maths and econ’? Maybe a select few courses might be considered subpar, but those joining lse for the career oomph wont need to worry about that anyways (the most cracked guy professionally in my year studies a degree you wouldnt believe is real)

I would do maths and econ, keeps all job opportunities open bar perhaps cs-focused quant research (i.e. advanced ai/ml). For that, do data science or study maths/cs/physics at a stem uni.
good maths jobs are data science (corporate to banks to hf/pe in mid office), trading, and generally any job that requires problem solving (i.e consulting).

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