The Student Room Group

A- levels

Okay guys and gyals, I need some help here. I'm from the UK and am doing my final couple of months of secondary (high) school. I'm looking at the courses i want to do at college, but I'm not sure if I can apply for three level 1 or 2 courses and be able to do them all at college. My google searches are not working for me either so some answers would be great people. Ty in advance.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 1
Original post by FLYINGSAUCERR
Okay guys and gyals, I need some help here. I'm from the UK and am doing my final couple of months of secondary (high) school. I'm looking at the courses i want to do at college, but I'm not sure if I can apply for three level 1 or 2 courses and be able to do them all at college. My google searches are not working for me either so some answers would be great people. Ty in advance.

I'm assuming your in Year 11 or the equivalent in Scotland and Northern Ireland? If you want to study a BTEC course, as long as you meet the GCSE requirements, you should be applying for a Level 3 Extended Diploma as this is a 2 year long course and the equivalent of 3 A levels, which will allow you to progress to higher level apprenticeships, university, certain jobs etc. If you're GCSEs end up being below the BTEC requirements (which are usually quite low, around the grade 4-5 range), then you would have to contact the college on results day to ask them if you can enrol in their Level 2 course, which is a year long. After completing that to a satisfactory level, you would likely be allowed to progress to the Level 3 course automatically. Check the requirements for the Level 3 courses at nearby colleges, as they usually only require a handful of 4s and 5s at GCSE to get onto the program. If you are also interested, you could look at some A level courses as you might find that there are subjects you'd like to do at A level that aren't offered in a BTEC (e.g. A level history topics won't come up in BTEC business). A levels usually have slightly higher requirements, but if you believe this is doable, then it would open up more doors for you, as some very highly ranked universities won't accept BTECs for certain courses (e.g. UCL won't accept BTECs for most of their courses). When applying for a Level 3 Extended Diploma, you'll want to make sure you only apply for one, unless you have plans of turning down several places and making your mind up on results day (generally not the wisest strategy unless you're applying to different colleges for different courses).

I'm currently in Year 12 studying A level politics, philosophy and psychology, but had applied for several BTEC Level 3 media courses when applying to post-16 education. I ended up changing my mind about BTECs around January time and then decided to apply for another local sixth form for A levels. Originally I wanted to study chemistry, biology and psychology, but that quickly switched to biology, psychology and philosophy (or RS) before results day in August. I ended up changing my mind again on results day as I'd gotten high grades in English, so started off college taking English language and literature, psychology and philosophy. About 3 weeks in, I realised English definitely wasn't for me and wanted to return to biology, but the spaces were filled, so I was going to settle for either politics or law. I'm nearly at the end of the year now and I don't regret any of my choices as I love all three of my subjects and my college. Definitely don't sell yourself short if you're thinking of A levels - anything is possible as long as you work hard. But in short, apply for Level 3 Extended Diplomas, not Level 2 or below.
Original post by bibachu
I'm assuming your in Year 11 or the equivalent in Scotland and Northern Ireland? If you want to study a BTEC course, as long as you meet the GCSE requirements, you should be applying for a Level 3 Extended Diploma as this is a 2 year long course and the equivalent of 3 A levels, which will allow you to progress to higher level apprenticeships, university, certain jobs etc. If you're GCSEs end up being below the BTEC requirements (which are usually quite low, around the grade 4-5 range), then you would have to contact the college on results day to ask them if you can enrol in their Level 2 course, which is a year long. After completing that to a satisfactory level, you would likely be allowed to progress to the Level 3 course automatically. Check the requirements for the Level 3 courses at nearby colleges, as they usually only require a handful of 4s and 5s at GCSE to get onto the program. If you are also interested, you could look at some A level courses as you might find that there are subjects you'd like to do at A level that aren't offered in a BTEC (e.g. A level history topics won't come up in BTEC business). A levels usually have slightly higher requirements, but if you believe this is doable, then it would open up more doors for you, as some very highly ranked universities won't accept BTECs for certain courses (e.g. UCL won't accept BTECs for most of their courses). When applying for a Level 3 Extended Diploma, you'll want to make sure you only apply for one, unless you have plans of turning down several places and making your mind up on results day (generally not the wisest strategy unless you're applying to different colleges for different courses).
I'm currently in Year 12 studying A level politics, philosophy and psychology, but had applied for several BTEC Level 3 media courses when applying to post-16 education. I ended up changing my mind about BTECs around January time and then decided to apply for another local sixth form for A levels. Originally I wanted to study chemistry, biology and psychology, but that quickly switched to biology, psychology and philosophy (or RS) before results day in August. I ended up changing my mind again on results day as I'd gotten high grades in English, so started off college taking English language and literature, psychology and philosophy. About 3 weeks in, I realised English definitely wasn't for me and wanted to return to biology, but the spaces were filled, so I was going to settle for either politics or law. I'm nearly at the end of the year now and I don't regret any of my choices as I love all three of my subjects and my college. Definitely don't sell yourself short if you're thinking of A levels - anything is possible as long as you work hard. But in short, apply for Level 3 Extended Diplomas, not Level 2 or below.

thank youuuu x

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending