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Economics and finance degree

I’m currently sitting my a levels and when applying for university I applied for economics and finance and am taking a year out. I’m now reconsidering and wanting to do straight economics, is there that much of a difference, I’m worried the finance aspect may lead to too much maths when I prefer the human side of economics? And is straight economics more employable post grad?
Original post by Flixrw
I’m currently sitting my a levels and when applying for university I applied for economics and finance and am taking a year out. I’m now reconsidering and wanting to do straight economics, is there that much of a difference, I’m worried the finance aspect may lead to too much maths when I prefer the human side of economics? And is straight economics more employable post grad?
The difference between straight economics and Econ+Fin will largely depend on which uni(s) you're considering, some unis have bigger differences between these courses, some have smaller.

But to give a general answer, usually there's not a whole lot of difference. Often doing Econ+Fin just means you might do an extra 1-2 finance modules per year out of 6-10 modules instead of 1-2 other economics modules. But the finance ones won't replace the core straight economics modules, they often just replace some optional ones or non-essential economics ones. To give an example, maybe in final year you might have to do a modules in corporate finance and asset pricing rather than classes in environmental economics and labour economics - so the finance won't replace key modules like micro/macro/econometrics.

In terms of the maths content, often financial/financial economics modules actually contain less hardcore maths than straight economics modules so I don't think this should be big concern for you. How mathsy these courses are will depend on the level of university (e.g. better ones typically have a lot more maths), but there shouldn't typically be a big difference in the maths content between these two courses for a given university.

Is straight economics more employable than Econ+Fin? Well, this naturally just depends on what sort of jobs you think you may potentially want to go into, we cannot answer this. It will be more employable for some jobs and less employable for others, but still the difference would be very very minimal and would simply reflect the content of the degree rather than how employer's perceive the degrees.
Reply 2
Original post by BenRyan99
The difference between straight economics and Econ+Fin will largely depend on which uni(s) you're considering, some unis have bigger differences between these courses, some have smaller.
But to give a general answer, usually there's not a whole lot of difference. Often doing Econ+Fin just means you might do an extra 1-2 finance modules per year out of 6-10 modules instead of 1-2 other economics modules. But the finance ones won't replace the core straight economics modules, they often just replace some optional ones or non-essential economics ones. To give an example, maybe in final year you might have to do a modules in corporate finance and asset pricing rather than classes in environmental economics and labour economics - so the finance won't replace key modules like micro/macro/econometrics.
In terms of the maths content, often financial/financial economics modules actually contain less hardcore maths than straight economics modules so I don't think this should be big concern for you. How mathsy these courses are will depend on the level of university (e.g. better ones typically have a lot more maths), but there shouldn't typically be a big difference in the maths content between these two courses for a given university.
Is straight economics more employable than Econ+Fin? Well, this naturally just depends on what sort of jobs you think you may potentially want to go into, we cannot answer this. It will be more employable for some jobs and less employable for others, but still the difference would be very very minimal and would simply reflect the content of the degree rather than how employer's perceive the degrees.

Thank you very much, really appreciate this, wish you all the best.
Original post by BenRyan99
The difference between straight economics and Econ+Fin will largely depend on which uni(s) you're considering, some unis have bigger differences between these courses, some have smaller.
But to give a general answer, usually there's not a whole lot of difference. Often doing Econ+Fin just means you might do an extra 1-2 finance modules per year out of 6-10 modules instead of 1-2 other economics modules. But the finance ones won't replace the core straight economics modules, they often just replace some optional ones or non-essential economics ones. To give an example, maybe in final year you might have to do a modules in corporate finance and asset pricing rather than classes in environmental economics and labour economics - so the finance won't replace key modules like micro/macro/econometrics.
In terms of the maths content, often financial/financial economics modules actually contain less hardcore maths than straight economics modules so I don't think this should be big concern for you. How mathsy these courses are will depend on the level of university (e.g. better ones typically have a lot more maths), but there shouldn't typically be a big difference in the maths content between these two courses for a given university.
Is straight economics more employable than Econ+Fin? Well, this naturally just depends on what sort of jobs you think you may potentially want to go into, we cannot answer this. It will be more employable for some jobs and less employable for others, but still the difference would be very very minimal and would simply reflect the content of the degree rather than how employer's perceive the degrees.

which jobs are better with pure econ and better with econ and finance?
Original post by aneer3wq3wt
which jobs are better with pure econ and better with econ and finance?
It's pretty self-explanatory based on the names of the degrees...
sorry, rephrase my question
which jobs are best to go into if one does econ degree?
and whcih jobs are best most suited for finance career
ik finance is like banking but im just wondering the specific difference in job

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