The Student Room Group
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London

At LSE, is Economics or Economics and Maths better?

I think the economics modules for the econ and maths go into less detail so not sure which to pick. I do prefer maths though, can anyone who studies this tell me what the economics modules are like? Are they still as mathematical as the pure economics ones? Which one has better job prospects?
The maths in economics will be more applied, in other words it'll be taught specifically in an economic application context. This is because maths modules under economics wont be the same modules normal maths students take, however if you were to take maths and economics, then you will probably take the same maths modules as maths students, but this wont be taught or examined in an economic background. You will also look into more theoretical maths too, rather than just statistics and calculus.
Both courses will require you to do maths modules, but as you said maths and economics will have more maths. Think of it as your kind of doing 1/2 degrees of both courses and you'll only be expected to take the mandatory modules for both. Whereas. with pure economics, you would probably have some more choice in learning about economics such as economic history, international history etc, but this may be different at LSE as they do love to be more mathematically focused.

In terms of job prospects, recruiters wont really care, especially since they're similar. A degree nowaways, unfortunately, does not guarantee you a job but the fact you're at LSE is a good start since its an elite uni (recruiters will care more about this as essentially, the university has already done the vetting process of getting the best minded people in, so they know the type of standards top graduates can offer to them in a role).
Focus more on skill transfer and external work experience if you want better job prospects, its just how it is these days given so many people have degrees and are going for the same type of jobs.

Essentially, the main difference is the type of maths and what context it'll be taught in. Both will have maths with economic application, while maths and economics will have just maths (ie you wont see pure economic students take these maths modules) and more theory.
(edited 1 month ago)
Carr Saunders Halls, LSE
London School of Economics
London

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