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anyone have any POTD/Keats notes for these poems?

Does anyone have any notes for Look We Have Coming To Dover or Disappointed Man?
And for Keats, does anyone have any notes for To Sleep or To Autumn?
Would really appreciate it :smile:
Not extensive, but here are some of my disappointed man notes

From the Journal of a Disappointed Man

· Distinct, ironic differences between aspects of society and masculinity.
· The speaker (writer in this place) he writes about silent men that speak to each other in monosyllables ironic because writer doesn’t speak at all.
· Writer judges their behaviour, doesn’t contribute and reveals more about his own weaknesses by being judgemental hypocrisy also?
· Language of masculinity, physicality. Asyndetic list, stanza 1 mechanised workings of the pier and the pile almost mirror robotic transactions of workmen e.g. stanza 3.
· Unreliable writer in his judgemental, distanced, different perspective.
· ‘massive affair’ lack of understanding, ‘as I said’, his loss of how to describe intricacies of work and therefore repetition of ‘pile’ suggests distance academically, socially, physically and linguistically.
· Heightened by enjambment ‘swinging/over…’ left in mid-air, reflects speaker feelings: dislocated, displaced in hive of activity, out of place when observing scene.
· Stanza 2 closer observations: ‘massive’, ‘very’ repeated. Distanced further. Scale of what he’s viewing suggests scale of social distance by lack of understanding of their work + social.
· ‘ruminative’ educated style of writing. Insight into why ignoring him they sense judgement but choose to ignore the judgey observer: deliberate ignoring. Or speaker feels injustice at his own social exclusion so chooses to create situation out of nothing. These men are just working but his intrusion into their work day is not wilful ignorance, the speaker is just offended.
· From now on, the speaker’s judgement is the most offensive part of the poem (not the men).
· Observations: impartial, objective? Small subtleties in language of men ‘at all’ critical, perhaps they should be talking, speaker feel he is missing out camaraderie/jealousy as the men are together and speaker wishfully things they share a sense of inclusion.
· Superiority stanza 4: ‘I could tell’…observations -> criticisms. ‘I cannot say what’ removes his power insignificant in contrast to situation they’re facing.
· By the 4th stanza he fully understands. By 5th, he has joined the men in the same lack of understanding of the situation.
· ‘monsters’ he can’t understand nature of difficulty as men. But he chooses to describe them as monsters, widening gap. Hypocritical criticism for their inability to understand (irony).
· He’s not silent on subject, lack of understanding he’s the monster. Voicing disdain. Not contributing.
· ‘tired’ repeated defeatist attitude, no understanding of their disillusionment and potential apathy frustration at men not solving the issue, hence ‘disappointed man’ in title. Start of the disappointment here? Men aren’t disappointed by failure, happy to leave unresolved, speaker frustrated, no closure by end of poem, observations karma for hypocrisy/criticism.
· Observations more lengthy ‘for an hour’, ‘crack of doom; time passing, silence building.
· Silence builds - ‘saying nothing’, ‘how’, ‘gazing to a mystic’ ‘no one spoke’. Defeatist attitude culminates.
· ‘-‘ resolute, defeat, ‘ceased’ verbs, anti-climatic issue. Epitome of his disappointment. Seeds that begin his ultimate disappointment of walking away.
· Adverbial ‘one man after’…show defeat. Everything dissipates. The sene he observes breaks down, but the writer holds true to his rigid form: desperate for control, a solution. What he sees is gradual dissolution.
· Last 4 stanzas gradual ceasing after activity.
· ‘same depths’ writer’s hope for solution.
‘and me of course’ inevitability of disappointment/ almost deserved final irony, abandoned by men who he saw as rejecting him to begin with. But men never rejected in first place. He chose to remark isolated didn’t have to stay. Pile represents own hypocrisy remain in situation
Reply 2
Original post by cinmnsoul
Not extensive, but here are some of my disappointed man notes
From the Journal of a Disappointed Man
· Distinct, ironic differences between aspects of society and masculinity.
· The speaker (writer in this place) he writes about silent men that speak to each other in monosyllables ironic because writer doesn’t speak at all.
· Writer judges their behaviour, doesn’t contribute and reveals more about his own weaknesses by being judgemental hypocrisy also?
· Language of masculinity, physicality. Asyndetic list, stanza 1 mechanised workings of the pier and the pile almost mirror robotic transactions of workmen e.g. stanza 3.
· Unreliable writer in his judgemental, distanced, different perspective.
· ‘massive affair’ lack of understanding, ‘as I said’, his loss of how to describe intricacies of work and therefore repetition of ‘pile’ suggests distance academically, socially, physically and linguistically.
· Heightened by enjambment ‘swinging/over…’ left in mid-air, reflects speaker feelings: dislocated, displaced in hive of activity, out of place when observing scene.
· Stanza 2 closer observations: ‘massive’, ‘very’ repeated. Distanced further. Scale of what he’s viewing suggests scale of social distance by lack of understanding of their work + social.
· ‘ruminative’ educated style of writing. Insight into why ignoring him they sense judgement but choose to ignore the judgey observer: deliberate ignoring. Or speaker feels injustice at his own social exclusion so chooses to create situation out of nothing. These men are just working but his intrusion into their work day is not wilful ignorance, the speaker is just offended.
· From now on, the speaker’s judgement is the most offensive part of the poem (not the men).
· Observations: impartial, objective? Small subtleties in language of men ‘at all’ critical, perhaps they should be talking, speaker feel he is missing out camaraderie/jealousy as the men are together and speaker wishfully things they share a sense of inclusion.
· Superiority stanza 4: ‘I could tell’…observations -> criticisms. ‘I cannot say what’ removes his power insignificant in contrast to situation they’re facing.
· By the 4th stanza he fully understands. By 5th, he has joined the men in the same lack of understanding of the situation.
· ‘monsters’ he can’t understand nature of difficulty as men. But he chooses to describe them as monsters, widening gap. Hypocritical criticism for their inability to understand (irony).
· He’s not silent on subject, lack of understanding he’s the monster. Voicing disdain. Not contributing.
· ‘tired’ repeated defeatist attitude, no understanding of their disillusionment and potential apathy frustration at men not solving the issue, hence ‘disappointed man’ in title. Start of the disappointment here? Men aren’t disappointed by failure, happy to leave unresolved, speaker frustrated, no closure by end of poem, observations karma for hypocrisy/criticism.
· Observations more lengthy ‘for an hour’, ‘crack of doom; time passing, silence building.
· Silence builds - ‘saying nothing’, ‘how’, ‘gazing to a mystic’ ‘no one spoke’. Defeatist attitude culminates.
· ‘-‘ resolute, defeat, ‘ceased’ verbs, anti-climatic issue. Epitome of his disappointment. Seeds that begin his ultimate disappointment of walking away.
· Adverbial ‘one man after’…show defeat. Everything dissipates. The sene he observes breaks down, but the writer holds true to his rigid form: desperate for control, a solution. What he sees is gradual dissolution.
· Last 4 stanzas gradual ceasing after activity.
· ‘same depths’ writer’s hope for solution.
‘and me of course’ inevitability of disappointment/ almost deserved final irony, abandoned by men who he saw as rejecting him to begin with. But men never rejected in first place. He chose to remark isolated didn’t have to stay. Pile represents own hypocrisy remain in situation

Thank you!

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