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Ancient History A-Level quotes

I have my greek [Peloponnesian/Persian war and Spartan case study] A-Level exam coming up and I really struggle with recalling the quotes in the actual mocks/test exams I do. Are there any revision techniques im maybe missing out on? Also, how many quotes are actually necessary to learn prior the the exam? I'm worried im trying to overcram or learn too many all at once
I have the same problem
Original post by RobbleRar
I have my greek [Peloponnesian/Persian war and Spartan case study] A-Level exam coming up and I really struggle with recalling the quotes in the actual mocks/test exams I do. Are there any revision techniques im maybe missing out on? Also, how many quotes are actually necessary to learn prior the the exam? I'm worried im trying to overcram or learn too many all at once

Why do you have to learn direct quotes? Can't you just paraphrase? I don't mark this paper, but in my experience, I have never looked for direct quotes when marking.
Reply 3
Original post by McKerrow_History
Why do you have to learn direct quotes? Can't you just paraphrase? I don't mark this paper, but in my experience, I have never looked for direct quotes when marking.

From what I've been told (maybe they're overexaggerating?) we're supposed to learn the quotes, and while it's okay to paraphrase to an extent we also need to know the citations for them. Really hard to remember honestly T_T
I've seen a few ppl use citations in brackets but honestly I don't think I'm going to do that. But I can't offer any advice whether to do it or not bc I'm an online student
Reply 5
For remembering, I always find active recall to be the best. I’d make flashcards and really think about trying to remember the quote/ answer before you flip it over because it will be in your brain somewhere
Original post by RobbleRar
From what I've been told (maybe they're overexaggerating?) we're supposed to learn the quotes, and while it's okay to paraphrase to an extent we also need to know the citations for them. Really hard to remember honestly T_T

What's the paper and exam board? I'll take a look at their mark scheme.
Original post by McKerrow_History
What's the paper and exam board? I'll take a look at their mark scheme.

OCR Ancient History A-Level Greek and Sparta
Original post by Babababababa
OCR Ancient History A-Level Greek and Sparta

So I was looking at a past paper and mark scheme (October 2021) and the mark scheme had a long list of sources that a candidate might use. Instead of quotes, do you mean you get a lot of extracts from historical sources like Herodotus and Thucydides? If this is the case, you would be much better off understanding the extracts rather than memorising quotes. Rote memorisation without understanding will take you nowhere. The paper I looked at mentioned that a candidate could use the following sources. There would be no way for 99.9% of candidates to memorise all this:

Herodotus 6.42-3
Herodotus 6.44, 48-9, 7.133
The Naqs-e Rustam inscriptions; Herodotus 6.94, 107; 7.1
Herodotus 6.112
Herodotus 7.8-10
Herodotus 7.144-5
Herodotus 7.6, 102
Herodotus 7.131-133, 138
Thucydides 1.96; Diodorus 11.46-7, 12.2.1-2, 12.4.4-6,
12.38.2; Thucydides 1.104, 109-110; Plutarch Cimon 13.4-5;
Harpokration s.v. Attikois grammasin; Herodotus 7.151;
Andokides 3.29; Aristophanes Acharnians 61-71; Thucydides
8.6, 18, Xenophon Hellenica 1.4.1-7

Paper: A Level Ancient History H407/11 June 2021 (ocr.org.uk)

MS: Mark scheme H407/11 Sparta and the Greek world Autumn 2021 (ocr.org.uk)
Reply 9
Original post by RobbleRar
I have my greek [Peloponnesian/Persian war and Spartan case study] A-Level exam coming up and I really struggle with recalling the quotes in the actual mocks/test exams I do. Are there any revision techniques im maybe missing out on? Also, how many quotes are actually necessary to learn prior the the exam? I'm worried im trying to overcram or learn too many all at once

Direct quotations are not very important in an exam. What matters much more is that you understand the content and can discuss it. Paraphrasing is fine.
hey !! i also do sparta and greek and from my experience in mocks and assessment we NEED to remember if not all then SOME quotes. something i suggest is flashcards with prompts (maybe a certain theme?) or creating some sort of rhym out of your quote bank so you can memorise it like you would a song.
Reply 11
Original post by lovelillie
hey !! i also do sparta and greek and from my experience in mocks and assessment we NEED to remember if not all then SOME quotes. something i suggest is flashcards with prompts (maybe a certain theme?) or creating some sort of rhym out of your quote bank so you can memorise it like you would a song.

And who told you that? Because lots of people told me that 20 years ago when I did my A-Levels too. It was *******s then (no direct quotes in my exam and I got A grade, before A* was a thing) and it's almost certainly *******s now.

The only reason teachers tell people to remember direct quotes, as far as I can tell, is when the student has no realistic prospect of understanding the content.
Original post by amgwl
And who told you that? Because lots of people told me that 20 years ago when I did my A-Levels too. It was *******s then (no direct quotes in my exam and I got A grade, before A* was a thing) and it's almost certainly *******s now.
The only reason teachers tell people to remember direct quotes, as far as I can tell, is when the student has no realistic prospect of understanding the content.

yeah, 20 years ago.

so when the question says "how do the sources support this?" youre gonna rock up with no sources?
(edited 3 weeks ago)
Original post by lovelillie
yeah, 20 years ago.
so when the question says "how do the sources support this?" youre gonna rock up with no sources?

The original question was about memorising direct quotes versus using the sources to answer the questions.
(edited 3 weeks ago)
Reply 14
Original post by lovelillie
yeah, 20 years ago.
so when the question says "how do the sources support this?" youre gonna rock up with no sources?

No, but I'm going to be sufficiently aware of the sources to explain their content without needing to regurgitate them verbatim. If you spend your time memorising the quotations instead of understanding the sources, then a lot of your exam answer won't be your own work.

All that said, I'm acutely aware that the Terror Gnome that is Michael Gove did a lot of work to make the structure of History courses rather silly, including source based questions without providing the actual sources.

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