The Student Room Group

joint courses

Is business and computing a joint course?
And I heard you need to study twice as hard in a joint course. Is it true?
If its a joint subject course - ie. 'and' between two different subject names - its a 50/50 split and you do only half the degree units in each subject - not two complete degrees. Your unit choices will be restricted by timetable clashes etc. Many people find this frustrating as they miss out on units they wanted to take - and they realise that they haven't studied either subject in enough depth.

I'd recommend looking at degrees called FinTech or Business Computing etc where its a cohesive degree and not 'split' between separate 'and' subjects :
Finance and Technology (FinTech) BSc : University of Sussex
Finance and Financial Technology (Hons) | BSc | University of Southampton
Business Computing, BSc | University of Greenwich, London
Business Computing Degree BSc (Hons) | University of Northampton
Original post by riik112233
Is business and computing a joint course?
And I heard you need to study twice as hard in a joint course. Is it true?

A joint honours course involves the exact same number of credits as a single honours course and thus in principle is the same amount of work. The challenge is in the administrative aspects as illustrate above, timetable clashes, dealing with two different department's policies and processes, and sometimes falling in the gap between depending how the course is organised.

There are plenty of unified courses involving business/management with IT elements. As well as those above there are courses variously named IMB/ITMB and similar which may be of interest. Although I'd note that adding "business" elements to a CS/IT degree isn't going to add any new opportunities you couldn't pursue with a single honours degree in CS/IT (and in fact, may limit you from some if you don't develop enough technical expertise).

The majority of generalist grad schemes don't care what you studied and you can go onto an accountancy grad scheme with a degree in engineering as well as one in history and politics, go into investment banking whether you did economics at a target uni or classics at a target uni, etc. For computing sector specific roles you usually need a "numerate" degree and they may specifically expect a CS/IT background. I gather usually the important thing is being able to pass leetcode assessments in the recruitment process as well as do well on any psychometric tests/assessment centre activities otherwise.
Original post by McGinger
If its a joint subject course - ie. 'and' between two different subject names - its a 50/50 split and you do only half the degree units in each subject - not two complete degrees. Your unit choices will be restricted by timetable clashes etc. Many people find this frustrating as they miss out on units they wanted to take - and they realise that they haven't studied either subject in enough depth.

I'd recommend looking at degrees called FinTech or Business Computing etc where its a cohesive degree and not 'split' between separate 'and' subjects :
Finance and Technology (FinTech) BSc : University of Sussex
Finance and Financial Technology (Hons) | BSc | University of Southampton
Business Computing, BSc | University of Greenwich, London
Business Computing Degree BSc (Hons) | University of Northampton

PRSOM :smile:

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending