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should i do economics at uni even though i do not like it?

hi. i'm planning on doing economics at uni but i do not enjoy the subject much but i really do not have many other options. the other courses that i'm interested in either have low employability rates or are not suited for me (e.g. psychology. whilst i enjoy the subject, i would not be able to perform well in a career related to psychology. i have extremely poor communication skills and dislike dealing with people)
Reply 1
Original post by Anonymous594
hi. i'm planning on doing economics at uni but i do not enjoy the subject much but i really do not have many other options. the other courses that i'm interested in either have low employability rates or are not suited for me (e.g. psychology. whilst i enjoy the subject, i would not be able to perform well in a career related to psychology. i have extremely poor communication skills and dislike dealing with people)


I’d say don’t do something you don’t enjoy, but many people go on to have careers that aren’t related to their degrees. Look over the modules because there may be some topics that will interest you. If you really don’t like it, you’ll be miserable for 3 years studying it.
Reply 2
Psychology doesn't have to just be counseling, there are tons of career paths available. You could do something like engineering psychology or something in advertising etc, it's applicable to many different areas.
Original post by Anonymous594
hi. i'm planning on doing economics at uni but i do not enjoy the subject much but i really do not have many other options. the other courses that i'm interested in either have low employability rates or are not suited for me (e.g. psychology. whilst i enjoy the subject, i would not be able to perform well in a career related to psychology. i have extremely poor communication skills and dislike dealing with people)

Obviously not. The only jobs an economics degree is required for are economic policy and economist positions. The other roles that economics grads often go into don't require an economics degree, and the very lucrative ones (e.g. investment banking and management consulting) accept any first degree. And there's little point doing something you hate for no reason.

Equally you can't be an investment banker or management consultant if you have poor communication skills and are unable or unwilling to deal with people.

Ultimately employability will depend on you, not your degree subject.
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by artful_lounger
Obviously not. The only jobs economics is required for are economic policy and economist positions. The other roles that economics grads often go into don't require an economics degree, and the very lucrative ones (e.g. investment banking and management consulting) accept any first degree. Equally you can't be an investment banker or management consultant if you have poor communication skills and are unable or unwilling to deal with people.
Ultimately employability will depend on you, not your degree subject.

i'm not "unwilling" to deal with people, it's just difficult for me to do it the right way. but i'd be fine with a job where the interactions are highly scripted and there is not much interaction between coworkers
Original post by Foxehh
Psychology doesn't have to just be counseling, there are tons of career paths available. You could do something like engineering psychology or something in advertising etc, it's applicable to many different areas.
i talked with the career advisor in my school and she said that every career in psychology requires interpersonal skills so idk
Original post by Anonymous594
i'm not "unwilling" to deal with people, it's just difficult for me to do it the right way. but i'd be fine with a job where the interactions are highly scripted and there is not much interaction between coworkers

Investment bankers and management consultants will need to be pitching to potential clients, meeting with other external stakeholders, as well as going through day to day calls and meetings with internal contacts, none of which will be "scripted" really. You also need to network a lot in those sectors which is very unscripted.

But my point still stands regarding those careers and that there's hence no point doing an economics degree because even if you did get through it with a good result in spite of not enjoying the subject, the careers that skew economics graduate salaries higher are those ones noted above which have much higher than average salaries, which the kinds of people who go into economics degrees tend to be very motivated in pursuing. If you aren't realistically able to do that kind of job then what's the point of doing a degree you don't enjoy to get there?

I'd also note you may find the kinds of students that do economics degrees harder to socialise with and relate to since they do tend to be those much more career driven types that actively engage in many social relationships to leverage their ambitions anyway.

Equally you really do need to have good interpersonal communication ability for any job as all jobs are inherently team based to some degree. This is however something you can develop, and it is true some careers may require somewhat lesser levels of interpersonal communication abilities - but you will need some. There really aren't careers where you're just doing "scripted" communication that pay significantly more than minimum wage because, well - you can pay anyone to follow a script in that context.

The obvious exception is an actual script for performing arts professionals, some of whom do make a lot of money. But that still involves a lot of less scripted interactions in interviews and public appearances and also the majority do not make it big in Hollywood/Broadway/etc.
Reply 7
Original post by Anonymous594
i talked with the career advisor in my school and she said that every career in psychology requires interpersonal skills so idk

You need basic interpersonal skills for any job. That's not specific to psychology.
Original post by Foxehh
You need basic interpersonal skills for any job. That's not specific to psychology.

i know. but you need a higher level of communication skills in psych related careers
Original post by Anonymous594
i know. but you need a higher level of communication skills in psych related careers

But the point is that just because you have a Psych degree, doesn't mean you have to go into a psych related career. I'd be surprised if more than about 10% of Psych graduates are in a career where having a Psych degree was a requirement. Most real jobs (beyond the general 'category' names like Banking, Finance, Law, Healthcare) are subject-indifferent.
Original post by threeportdrift
But the point is that just because you have a Psych degree, doesn't mean you have to go into a psych related career. I'd be surprised if more than about 10% of Psych graduates are in a career where having a Psych degree was a requirement. Most real jobs (beyond the general 'category' names like Banking, Finance, Law, Healthcare) are subject-indifferent.

ok

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