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An Inspector Calls Help

How do I actually annotate this? What quotes are key and what do I say about them? I’m quite confused about how to do it. Normally I’m really good at analysing things and can naturally do it by myself. I understand the text fully but since I have a couple of teachers I don’t understand exactly what we need to annotate and why. Also if anyone could send me an answer to the sort of questions you could be asked that would be excellent.
Hey there, thought I'd try advise you a little since I did An Inspector Calls at GCSE and got a 9 in 2021, don't take this as perfect advice though!
For example questions, you might want to look back at your exam board's website for those used in past papers. Getting them direct from there is a great resource, but if you're looking for others you could ask your teachers or search the web.
I'd say understanding the questions is key to what you choose to annotate and the quotes you choose to learn. Lots of questions ask you to analyse the key messages and themes of the text, and how the characters change over the course of the text or are used as metaphors for key societal issues. I
decided what to quote by identifying key words, themes and structural elements, e.g. class, conflict between the older and younger generations, gender. You could create a mind map for this. Then, I went back through the text and looked for the best examples I could to demonstrate the themes I'd picked out. You might annotate these with the techniques they use, their significance in other parts of the play or information on the context in society which they refer to. It can also be useful to note secondary themes they might touch on, so you could reuse the quote as a link to the wider text in a question about a different theme. From there you might practice answering some questions and create revision resources, like a quote bank which collects the best quotes which you want to remember in one place. Hope that helps a little, good luck! :smile:
Reply 2
Original post by CluelessCuteness
Hey there, thought I'd try advise you a little since I did An Inspector Calls at GCSE and got a 9 in 2021, don't take this as perfect advice though!
For example questions, you might want to look back at your exam board's website for those used in past papers. Getting them direct from there is a great resource, but if you're looking for others you could ask your teachers or search the web.
I'd say understanding the questions is key to what you choose to annotate and the quotes you choose to learn. Lots of questions ask you to analyse the key messages and themes of the text, and how the characters change over the course of the text or are used as metaphors for key societal issues. I
decided what to quote by identifying key words, themes and structural elements, e.g. class, conflict between the older and younger generations, gender. You could create a mind map for this. Then, I went back through the text and looked for the best examples I could to demonstrate the themes I'd picked out. You might annotate these with the techniques they use, their significance in other parts of the play or information on the context in society which they refer to. It can also be useful to note secondary themes they might touch on, so you could reuse the quote as a link to the wider text in a question about a different theme. From there you might practice answering some questions and create revision resources, like a quote bank which collects the best quotes which you want to remember in one place. Hope that helps a little, good luck! :smile:


Thank you so much! I will definitely try out the things you have suggested 😀
Reply 3
Original post by ibella09
Thank you so much! I will definitely try out the things you have suggested 😀
Everything that they have suggested is spot on!
If you're stuck on the annotating bit, I would suggest exploding the quotes. With the quotes that you've memorised, break them down word for word and look for any good connotations, symbols, literary techniques used that can help with your argument. Ask yourself why the writer used certain words.

For example, if we take this quote from the stage directions describing Mr Birling:
'Arthur Birling is a heavy-looking, rather portentous man in his middle fifties'.

Okay, so he's 'heavy-looking' - why would Priestley use the word 'heavy-looking' instead of 'fat' or 'obese'? He appears to the audience as being weighed down, weighed down by what? Greed? Wealth? His own wrongdoings? He's 'portentous', meaning he has large amounts of pride and self importance. And Priestley uses the adverb 'rather' to enhance that large amount of self importance even further. You can see with these word choices ('heavy' 'rather portentous'), there's a sense of vastness, a sense of breadth and weight surrounding Mr Birling. Do you see how it all ties together? What does this tell you about the character? How does it link to particular themes e.g capitalism?

Try to apply this type of critical thinking to your quotes and I'm sure you'll do amazing!😊
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 4
Original post by piareia
Everything that they have suggested is spot on!
If you're stuck on the annotating bit, I would suggest exploding the quotes. With the quotes that you've memorised, break them down word for word and look for any good connotations, symbols, literary techniques used that can help with your argument. Ask yourself why the writer used certain words.
For example, if we take this quote from the stage directions describing Mr Birling:
'Arthur Birling is a heavy-looking, rather portentous man in his middle fifties'.
Okay, so he's 'heavy-looking' - why would Priestley use the word 'heavy-looking' instead of 'fat' or 'obese'? He appears to the audience as being weighed down, weighed down by what? Greed? Wealth? His own wrongdoings? He's 'portentous', meaning he has large amounts of pride and self importance. And Priestley uses the adverb 'rather' to enhance that large amount of self importance even further. You can see with these word choices ('heavy' 'rather portentous'), there's a sense of vastness, a sense of breadth and weight surrounding Mr Birling. Do you see how it all ties together? What does this tell you about the character? How does it link to particular themes e.g capitalism?
Try to apply this type of critical thinking to your quotes and I'm sure you'll do amazing!😊


Thank you so so much that’s wonderfully put! 😀

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