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Italian Revision - AQA GCSE

I’m unsure of how to revise for a language in general and it seems that there aren’t many resources for Italian language. Any suggestions would be great I’m aiming for a 7-9 x
Hiii
I'm in my first year of uni doing Spanish and Portuguese, and you're so right, revising for languages is a bit awkward.
There isn't really a set way to do it, but my advice would be:

practicing grammar to improve any recurring mistakes;

practicing writing in the language for fluency - it might help you see any vocab gaps as well;

learning connectors very well, having a variety is so useful;

knowing your verb conjugations (I'm not sure if there are any for Italian but I've played games online for Portuguese and done tests to make it more interesting);

having a couple of phrases that you know how to use well that are top grade - I don't know much Italian at all but for my Spanish GCSE and A Level the teachers encouraged using the subjunctive and some set phrases that aren't direct translations of English.

I think most of these can benefit you in the four aspects usually assessed (listening, speaking, reading, writing) but more generally I'd say for better fluency try to incorporate some small things into the day-to-day which keep you on your toes; my teachers' advice has repeatedly been to listen to music in the target language, watch films in the language with English subtitles or vice versa (my personal fave, refreshes a lot of vocab), incorporating it into any social media you use etc.

This is a bit extreme but if you feel you can do it now or want to carry on with Italian, changing your phone to the language is a good brain exercise! (sometimes a bit too much lol)
Speaking can be tricky but honestly practicing is the best way to do it, I did two exchanges which completely transformed my fluency because of how constantly I was using Spanish, so find any excuse to have a go!

Hope this helps! :smile:
Reply 2
Original post by amy_alevels
Hiii
I'm in my first year of uni doing Spanish and Portuguese, and you're so right, revising for languages is a bit awkward.
There isn't really a set way to do it, but my advice would be:

practicing grammar to improve any recurring mistakes;

practicing writing in the language for fluency - it might help you see any vocab gaps as well;

learning connectors very well, having a variety is so useful;

knowing your verb conjugations (I'm not sure if there are any for Italian but I've played games online for Portuguese and done tests to make it more interesting);

having a couple of phrases that you know how to use well that are top grade - I don't know much Italian at all but for my Spanish GCSE and A Level the teachers encouraged using the subjunctive and some set phrases that aren't direct translations of English.

I think most of these can benefit you in the four aspects usually assessed (listening, speaking, reading, writing) but more generally I'd say for better fluency try to incorporate some small things into the day-to-day which keep you on your toes; my teachers' advice has repeatedly been to listen to music in the target language, watch films in the language with English subtitles or vice versa (my personal fave, refreshes a lot of vocab), incorporating it into any social media you use etc.
This is a bit extreme but if you feel you can do it now or want to carry on with Italian, changing your phone to the language is a good brain exercise! (sometimes a bit too much lol)
Speaking can be tricky but honestly practicing is the best way to do it, I did two exchanges which completely transformed my fluency because of how constantly I was using Spanish, so find any excuse to have a go!
Hope this helps! :smile:


Thank you so much! Best of luck in uni

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