The Student Room Group

How do universities get their reputation?

For example - Nottingham, Leeds and Manchester have the reputation of being party unis.

Bath is known as a sporty uni.

Durham is known as a very posh uni.

Obviously, I assume Bath invests heavily on sports facilities but do universities like Nottingham and Leeds focus on student life or is it purely just down to the fact these are cities where the nightlife is good anyway?

For example, LSE is in London which has great clubs such as Ministry of Sound but it doesn't have the reputation of being a party uni.

P.s. They had us in the first half - this is not a prestige debate
Reply 1
Generally speaking, the party universities are redbrick ones founded from around 1880 until about 1920. They tend to be in medium to large cities. It is a combination of the attractiveness of the university, its halls, and the wealth of things to do in the city that makes it a party university, with a yoyoing between what's available on campus, what's available in its halls, and what's available in the city, with none necessarily 'winning' that battle for where the most fun is but the campus and halls will undoubtedly be fun. Maybe Glasgow might be classed as one too.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 2
Original post by jumpman123
I see but then how come the London unis don't have such a massive party reputation?

I've editted my reply now. It's because to be a party university, it's not enough for the city it's in to have lots of fun. The campus and halls must be fun. The London universities perhaps don't have as much integration between campus and halls. And the top London universities have lots of international students and the straight A students who don't necessarily have the same love of party culture.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 3
Original post by Picnicl
I've editted my reply now. It's because to be a party university, it's not enough for the city it's in to have lots of fun. The campus and halls must be fun. The London universities perhaps don't have as much integration between campus and halls. And the top London universities have lots of international students and the straight A students who don't necessarily have the same love of party culture.

Ok yes fair enough but for example, Bristol, Nottingham and Manchester often have similar requirements to KCL & sometimes UCL so surely this is a small factor? I know UCL for example is quite competitive for some courses so having a deep interest and love for the subject might attract the more (idk any polite term for this) nerdy students who seriously enjoy their subject and read about it in their spare time, and then KCL students are often UCL rejects so.
I wouldn’t have put Nottingham in a list of “party” universities personally.
Reply 5
Manchester, Leeds, and Nottingham (not so much Bristol) have some really nice old halls of residences which have character. It gives those universities an Oxbridge college effect in places that you don't get with the London universities, but with more urban vitality than at Oxbridge. To get a party vibe, it can help to have at least some classic older accommodation as it gives a 'bragging rights' feel to a university that can attract house parties.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 6
Original post by jumpman123
Ok yes fair enough but for example, Bristol, Nottingham and Manchester often have similar requirements to KCL & sometimes UCL so surely this is a small factor? I know UCL for example is quite competitive for some courses so having a deep interest and love for the subject might attract the more (idk any polite term for this) nerdy students who seriously enjoy their subject and read about it in their spare time, and then KCL students are often UCL rejects so.

Yeah actually somewhere like Bristol has an average higher UCAS tariff than warwick which known to be nerdy, I doubt its because their students are less intelligent on average, I think it has to do purely with the city they are in, large metropolitan cities with big night clubs and music scense, something you would not see at bath, exeter etc. Also london is so large and full of internationals that they just party less as its hard to party as a student in london as its expensive
Reply 7
Original post by pq
I wouldn’t have put Nottingham in a list of “party” universities personally.

Nah I would. I've only heard good things about the uni and the city's clubs.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 8
Original post by new-sick
Yeah actually somewhere like Bristol has an average higher UCAS tariff than warwick which known to be nerdy, I doubt its because their students are less intelligent on average, I think it has to do purely with the city they are in, large metropolitan cities with big night clubs and music scense, something you would not see at bath, exeter etc. Also london is so large and full of internationals that they just party less as its hard to party as a student in london as its expensive

Honestly, Warwick is probably seen as more nerdy because of the location and the dead social scene there. Bristol is supposedly a vibey student experience.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending