The Student Room Group

About psychology sociology law a level

So I like psychology a level more then sociology as find it more interesting and think it is more manageable as has lesser content then sociology aqa both btw and I think has more writing and essays in sociology and I feel revising psych would be easier so that’s why prefer it and you got to memorise so much case studies is that same to law ocr btw if any of yous do any of these subjects lmk with same examboard and I’m saying do law a level involve memorising cases like sociology ik psych is evaluation points which much prefer tbf and what other a levels like also thinking about religion and ethics business studies economics politics

Scroll to see replies

Reply 1
I do Sociology AQA, Pyschology AQA and Economics AQA.
Original post by idklol1
I do Sociology AQA, Pyschology AQA and Economics AQA.

Thoughts on all like which do you find easiest and hardest and why
Original post by idklol1
I do Sociology AQA, Pyschology AQA and Economics AQA.
you do the examboard that wanted aqa for all them 3 give thoughts like said before thanks would do me a favour?
Reply 4
Original post by Brianstudy01
Thoughts on all like which do you find easiest and hardest and why

find psychology the easiest simply because the content and theories are interesting, which makes learning enjoyable. Economics is alright; if you pay attention in class and read the news, you'll be fine. Sociology, on the other hand, was the hardest for me because there's a lot of content to remember, and I haven't come across many helpful resources online.
Original post by idklol1
find psychology the easiest simply because the content and theories are interesting, which makes learning enjoyable. Economics is alright; if you pay attention in class and read the news, you'll be fine. Sociology, on the other hand, was the hardest for me because there's a lot of content to remember, and I haven't come across many helpful resources online.

Out of them all which has the most memorisation ik sociology has most essays but which has more essays psych or econ and which has more content out of econ and psych knows soc has most so I am saying out of the 2 psych and economics???
Reply 6
Original post by Brianstudy01
Out of them all which has the most memorisation ik sociology has most essays but which has more essays psych or econ and which has more content out of econ and psych knows soc has most so I am saying out of the 2 psych and economics???
Sociology has the most content out of the three.
Between sociology and psychology, sociology definitely has the most content to learn and remember.

Regarding the actual questions in the exams, for economics, the highest question would be a 25 marker. For psychology, it would be a 16 marker, and for sociology, it would be a 30 marker.

I wouldn't recommend doing all three essay subjects like I am, as it is a lot to remember and involves a whole lot of writing
Reply 7
Original post by idklol1
Sociology has the most content out of the three.
Between sociology and psychology, sociology definitely has the most content to learn and remember.
Regarding the actual questions in the exams, for economics, the highest question would be a 25 marker. For psychology, it would be a 16 marker, and for sociology, it would be a 30 marker.
I wouldn't recommend doing all three essay subjects like I am, as it is a lot to remember and involves a whole lot of writing
For sociology, you will defo have one 30-marker question in both Paper One and Three. In psychology, you can expect to have anything between 0-4 of the 16-marker questions in each of Papers One, Two, and Three.

Some things in sociology and psychology overlap; for example, research methods. But sociology is very helpful for economics.
Original post by idklol1
For sociology, you will defo have one 30-marker question in both Paper One and Three. In psychology, you can expect to have anything between 0-4 of the 16-marker questions in each of Papers One, Two, and Three.
Some things in sociology and psychology overlap; for example, research methods. But sociology is very helpful for economics.

How is sociology helpful for economics I’m thinking picking between psychology and econ which has more content out of the two and is easier and why and lesser memorisation??
Original post by idklol1
For sociology, you will defo have one 30-marker question in both Paper One and Three. In psychology, you can expect to have anything between 0-4 of the 16-marker questions in each of Papers One, Two, and Three.
Some things in sociology and psychology overlap; for example, research methods. But sociology is very helpful for economics.

And which out of Econ and Psych has more writing like essays like more of and name them
Reply 10
Original post by Brianstudy01
So I like psychology a level more then sociology as find it more interesting and think it is more manageable as has lesser content then sociology aqa both btw and I think has more writing and essays in sociology and I feel revising psych would be easier so that’s why prefer it and you got to memorise so much case studies is that same to law ocr btw if any of yous do any of these subjects lmk with same examboard and I’m saying do law a level involve memorising cases like sociology ik psych is evaluation points which much prefer tbf and what other a levels like also thinking about religion and ethics business studies economics politics
Hello, hope you are well.
I am a Y13 student doing A-levels in AQA Psychology, WJEC Law, French and Maths.
Psychology is a relatively easy A-level to pass (at least in my opinion). The content is interesting enough and the papers are quite manageable as the layout is similar to a standard GCSE paper. The only issues you might encounter is the specificity of the questions in relation to studies that have to be memorised and evaluation points and structure for 16 markers. The key here would be to just memorise some generic evaluation and apply it to the context. However, if you are looking for the top grades then a lot of work is needed to access these. Good news is there are a lot of revision resources and it is quite easy to revise.
For Law, as long as you are interested in the subject you will enjoy the course. I have to say yes, there is a lot of content and your grade will primarily rely upon how much you can remember (unlike psychology where you can make most of it up with a bit of common sense logic if you happen to forget). There is a heavy focus on case law, statutes and key legal terminology. Having said this, it is my favourite course and I am hoping to continue with law at a degree level. The key thing here is to constantly test yourself on the knowledge itself (using flashcards/ quizzes/ Feynman technique etc) and learn a essay structure that can be applied to any question type.
Psychology has more essay writing and more content to learn than economics. I think it's definitely beneficial to look at all three papers for each of these subjects so you can see the type of questions they'll ask and their marks. Economics is easier, as some of its content is common sense, for example, taxes, interest rates, and inflation, as they are always covered in the news and are current topics in our everyday lives, affecting us now. Sociology also helps with economics, as one of the main overlapping topics is inequalities. For example, discrimination in the workforce, such as gender discrimination, and how that affects people's income, etc.
Original post by idklol1
Psychology has more essay writing and more content to learn than economics. I think it's definitely beneficial to look at all three papers for each of these subjects so you can see the type of questions they'll ask and their marks. Economics is easier, as some of its content is common sense, for example, taxes, interest rates, and inflation, as they are always covered in the news and are current topics in our everyday lives, affecting us now. Sociology also helps with economics, as one of the main overlapping topics is inequalities. For example, discrimination in the workforce, such as gender discrimination, and how that affects people's income, etc.
so economics is more manageable
Original post by Kerahil
Hello, hope you are well.
I am a Y13 student doing A-levels in AQA Psychology, WJEC Law, French and Maths.
Psychology is a relatively easy A-level to pass (at least in my opinion). The content is interesting enough and the papers are quite manageable as the layout is similar to a standard GCSE paper. The only issues you might encounter is the specificity of the questions in relation to studies that have to be memorised and evaluation points and structure for 16 markers. The key here would be to just memorise some generic evaluation and apply it to the context. However, if you are looking for the top grades then a lot of work is needed to access these. Good news is there are a lot of revision resources and it is quite easy to revise.
For Law, as long as you are interested in the subject you will enjoy the course. I have to say yes, there is a lot of content and your grade will primarily rely upon how much you can remember (unlike psychology where you can make most of it up with a bit of common sense logic if you happen to forget). There is a heavy focus on case law, statutes and key legal terminology. Having said this, it is my favourite course and I am hoping to continue with law at a degree level. The key thing here is to constantly test yourself on the knowledge itself (using flashcards/ quizzes/ Feynman technique etc) and learn a essay structure that can be applied to any question type.

Which is easier law or psych?
Original post by Kerahil
Hello, hope you are well.
I am a Y13 student doing A-levels in AQA Psychology, WJEC Law, French and Maths.
Psychology is a relatively easy A-level to pass (at least in my opinion). The content is interesting enough and the papers are quite manageable as the layout is similar to a standard GCSE paper. The only issues you might encounter is the specificity of the questions in relation to studies that have to be memorised and evaluation points and structure for 16 markers. The key here would be to just memorise some generic evaluation and apply it to the context. However, if you are looking for the top grades then a lot of work is needed to access these. Good news is there are a lot of revision resources and it is quite easy to revise.
For Law, as long as you are interested in the subject you will enjoy the course. I have to say yes, there is a lot of content and your grade will primarily rely upon how much you can remember (unlike psychology where you can make most of it up with a bit of common sense logic if you happen to forget). There is a heavy focus on case law, statutes and key legal terminology. Having said this, it is my favourite course and I am hoping to continue with law at a degree level. The key thing here is to constantly test yourself on the knowledge itself (using flashcards/ quizzes/ Feynman technique etc) and learn a essay structure that can be applied to any question type.

Which has more memorisation and essays
Reply 15
Original post by Brianstudy01
Which is easier law or psych?
Objectively? Psychology. Less content, easier essays to write and if you are aiming for B-D you really don't need too much effort outside of what you did to prepare for GCSEs. Have a look over some Paper 1 revision blast videos to get an idea of how much you will need to know to reach the aforementioned grades.
Original post by Kerahil
Objectively? Psychology. Less content, easier essays to write and if you are aiming for B-D you really don't need too much effort outside of what you did to prepare for GCSEs. Have a look over some Paper 1 revision blast videos to get an idea of how much you will need to know to reach the aforementioned grades.

What about A
Reply 17
Original post by Brianstudy01
Which has more memorisation and essays
Objectively once again this is Law, however if you are interested in the subject this makes the essays actually quite fun and logical to write. You are given more time per essay in law and cases seem to stick better than psychology studies and case studies due to the absurdity of most case facts.
LAW: (this is for the WJEC exam board, every exam board differs so it's best to check out the one you will be studying)

All questions are essay/ extended writing based, no multiple choice here or fact recall for definitions, concepts etc

Focus on application to scenarios - you are given a situation and will have to apply your knowledge of the law to it

Other questions will be longer marks, describe/explain/evaluate/analyse a particular piece of law

Then essay questions on law analysis - you are given a concept in law and have to say whether it is effective or not, all evaluation here

Memorise statute and case law, legal concepts, reform ideas - with case law, only the legal point is actually necessary to memorise alongside the case name

Not all topics come up, make sure you know all thoroughly

Evaluation points are quite easy to make up but make sure you have supporting evidence

Without too much revision you are looking at a C/D grade if you are lucky (common sense answers not usually rewarded)

With effective revision, A/A* entirely accessible, grades fall when you start to forget

PSYCHOLOGY: (AQA)

Layout is like a GCSE science paper at higher level, but in slightly more detail

Clearly sectioned, all topics will come up eg. attachment, memory etc

1/2/4/6 markers very common across all sections, easy to pick up marks if you know the content

8 and 16 markers are essay-based - you are quite unlikely to receive full marks in these under the time limit

Tests knowledge and evaluation in 8 and 16 markers (sometimes application to a scenario)

Make sure your maths is up to standard for the research methods section

You will have to know the names, facts, method and findings of many studies and case studies for psychology as these are likely to come up as a question in themselves - level of detail usually equates to number of marks.

Similar evaluation points can be applied to most questions

Without too much revision you can access B-D grades quite easily

However A and A* grades require quite a lot of work and dependent on the paper these grade boundaries fluctuate, essay structure will have to be extensively practiced and knowledge very thorough.


So in summary, choose the subjects you know you will enjoy (look over prospective content). This will be 2 years of academic determination so make sure you will be able to stick with it in terms of motivation. Also, if you are thinking of further education, look at the requirements you will need - this might make the decision for you.
Original post by Kerahil
Objectively once again this is Law, however if you are interested in the subject this makes the essays actually quite fun and logical to write. You are given more time per essay in law and cases seem to stick better than psychology studies and case studies due to the absurdity of most case facts.
LAW: (this is for the WJEC exam board, every exam board differs so it's best to check out the one you will be studying)

All questions are essay/ extended writing based, no multiple choice here or fact recall for definitions, concepts etc

Focus on application to scenarios - you are given a situation and will have to apply your knowledge of the law to it

Other questions will be longer marks, describe/explain/evaluate/analyse a particular piece of law

Then essay questions on law analysis - you are given a concept in law and have to say whether it is effective or not, all evaluation here

Memorise statute and case law, legal concepts, reform ideas - with case law, only the legal point is actually necessary to memorise alongside the case name

Not all topics come up, make sure you know all thoroughly

Evaluation points are quite easy to make up but make sure you have supporting evidence

Without too much revision you are looking at a C/D grade if you are lucky (common sense answers not usually rewarded)

With effective revision, A/A* entirely accessible, grades fall when you start to forget

PSYCHOLOGY: (AQA)

Layout is like a GCSE science paper at higher level, but in slightly more detail

Clearly sectioned, all topics will come up eg. attachment, memory etc

1/2/4/6 markers very common across all sections, easy to pick up marks if you know the content

8 and 16 markers are essay-based - you are quite unlikely to receive full marks in these under the time limit

Tests knowledge and evaluation in 8 and 16 markers (sometimes application to a scenario)

Make sure your maths is up to standard for the research methods section

You will have to know the names, facts, method and findings of many studies and case studies for psychology as these are likely to come up as a question in themselves - level of detail usually equates to number of marks.

Similar evaluation points can be applied to most questions

Without too much revision you can access B-D grades quite easily

However A and A* grades require quite a lot of work and dependent on the paper these grade boundaries fluctuate, essay structure will have to be extensively practiced and knowledge very thorough.


So in summary, choose the subjects you know you will enjoy (look over prospective content). This will be 2 years of academic determination so make sure you will be able to stick with it in terms of motivation. Also, if you are thinking of further education, look at the requirements you will need - this might make the decision for you.

In that case which has more memorisation?
Original post by idklol1
For sociology, you will defo have one 30-marker question in both Paper One and Three. In psychology, you can expect to have anything between 0-4 of the 16-marker questions in each of Papers One, Two, and Three.
Some things in sociology and psychology overlap; for example, research methods. But sociology is very helpful for economics.

Which is easier to understand revise and is easier overall psych or econ thanks???

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending