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which university is good to study biomedical sciences?

looking for unis that would be on the friendlier side and have good support system academically.

Ive applied to:
London metropolitan
middlesex
university of greenwich

if there are any more suggestions please lmk
(please note I do not have really good a levels)
Original post by Riba232
looking for unis that would be on the friendlier side and have good support system academically.

Ive applied to:
London metropolitan
middlesex
university of greenwich

if there are any more suggestions please lmk
(please note I do not have really good a levels)

This would depend on multiple factors:

Would you like a degree that is NHS accredited or RSB accredited (RSB doesn't allow you to work in an NHS lab)?

What are your grades?

If you're eligible for any contextual offers e.g. if you live in an area of low participation (check POLAR4), if you were eligible for free school meals at any point, your parents didn't go to university, if you're of a minority ethnic group?

And what you mean by friendlier and good support system? As in societies, seminars, academic support, mental wellbeing support?

Original post by Riba232
looking for unis that would be on the friendlier side and have good support system academically.
Ive applied to:
London metropolitan
middlesex
university of greenwich
if there are any more suggestions please lmk
(please note I do not have really good a levels)

Good morning @Riba232,

The University of Reading does biomedical sciences!

I am an Ecological science student and work in the same school as the Biomedical students. The University of Reading has a good reputation for biological sciences and is in the top 200 QS world rankings. The information for the university rankings can be found here.

Similarly, the course page for biomedical science can be accessed via this link. There are plenty of modules to choose from alongside some core modules, and I highly recommend reading through them.

As for the application process, the University of Reading considered every application separately to ensure that everyone has an equal opportunity to access the university; more information on the application process can be found here.

In my opinion, there is a lot of support available at the university; there is a disability service team who can help throughout students' time at reading, and there are also financial advisors, career services, and counselling services everyone can contact. Also, the student union has events free for students throughout the year; these are a great way to make friends and destress from the courses.

I wish you the best of luck; if you have any questions, please contact me.

Many thanks
Ella😃
1st year Ecology and wildlife conservation.
Original post by JA03
This would depend on multiple factors:

Would you like a degree that is NHS accredited or RSB accredited (RSB doesn't allow you to work in an NHS lab)?

What are your grades?

If you're eligible for any contextual offers e.g. if you live in an area of low participation (check POLAR4), if you were eligible for free school meals at any point, your parents didn't go to university, if you're of a minority ethnic group?

And what you mean by friendlier and good support system? As in societies, seminars, academic support, mental wellbeing support?


Hi, I just want to correct some of this. There is no such thing as an NHS accredited biomedical science degree.

The title 'biomedical scientist' is protected title in the UK and that means you are required to be registered by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in order to work as a biomedical scientist. It's not an NHS requirement, it's a government legal requirement. The main important point for this line of work is that in order to authorise patient test results you must be registered with the HCPC as a biomedical scientist or clinical scientist, or registered as a medical doctor with the GMC.

The main route to become a biomedical scientist is to gain a certificate of competence from the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS). By far the easiest/most common method of doing this is to complete an IBMS accredited biomedical science degree and then find a work placement / job in an IBMS accredited training laboratory to finish the registration portfolio.

You can do other things with a biomedical science degree, but it's about being a biomedical scientist, not working in an NHS laboratory.

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