The Student Room Group

Choosing Uni for Law Dilemma

Hi, I currently have offers for LLB Law from: University of Liverpool, University of Central Lancashire, University of Salford, and University of Bradford. I am struggling to decide where to go.

Is it advantageous for me to choose a russell group uni (in my case Liverpool) or somewhere else? Would choosing a russell group university put me at an advantage and if I don't will it pose as a disadvantage when applying for jobs as I heard graduates from russell group universities are more sought after.

I want to definitely live at home due to the financial costs and other factors involved. However, this would mean that I would be travelling for a total of 4 hours everyday (outgoing and return) if I want to go to Liverpool.

However, I don't want to go to a closer university that could potentially put me at a disadvantage when looking at job prospects.

The closest universities to me are Salford and Bradford but both are ranked really low for Law.

UCLAN is also far from me totalling 4 hours (outgoing and return).

My main concern is that I want to go to a good university that is ranked high for Law and one that supports their students and the professors and lecturers are nice. If you are reading my post and study Law at the universities mentioned above especially The University of Liverpool, could you drop me a message if you don't mind.

I am the first in my family to go to university and I am not familiar with the university experience in The UK. I would really appreciate if someone could advice me.

Thank you
Original post by courtcraze
Hi, I currently have offers for LLB Law from: University of Liverpool, University of Central Lancashire, University of Salford, and University of Bradford. I am struggling to decide where to go.

Is it advantageous for me to choose a russell group uni (in my case Liverpool) or somewhere else? Would choosing a russell group university put me at an advantage and if I don't will it pose as a disadvantage when applying for jobs as I heard graduates from russell group universities are more sought after.

I want to definitely live at home due to the financial costs and other factors involved. However, this would mean that I would be travelling for a total of 4 hours everyday (outgoing and return) if I want to go to Liverpool.

However, I don't want to go to a closer university that could potentially put me at a disadvantage when looking at job prospects.

The closest universities to me are Salford and Bradford but both are ranked really low for Law.

UCLAN is also far from me totalling 4 hours (outgoing and return).

My main concern is that I want to go to a good university that is ranked high for Law and one that supports their students and the professors and lecturers are nice. If you are reading my post and study Law at the universities mentioned above especially The University of Liverpool, could you drop me a message if you don't mind.

I am the first in my family to go to university and I am not familiar with the university experience in The UK. I would really appreciate if someone could advice me.

Thank you

Is your career afterwards going to rely on you selling your personal skills, directly to a customer/client. Is it also going to be a career based on your intelligence and reputation? If yes to those, then it is generally better to start with the strongest university in the eyes of your likely clients and by association, employers. They may not specifically think Russell Group, but they will almost certainly think Liverpool above any of the others.

You have to move out of home at some point, Uni is the natural time.
For Law, 'which Uni' does matter - not necessarily RG but there are Unis that are 'known' for Law and these will give you more opportunities both within your degree and in terms of career. Liverpool followed by UCLAN from your list are the best picks, not because the others are rubbish, they aren't, but if you want to have a career connected to Law, they wont give you the best start.

Yes, you have other things to consider like travel time but you really do need to think about what you are going to Uni for. Are you looking for a career in Law or just 'a job' after your degree. Do you always intend to live at home - would a gap year with a job convince your family that you could move into Halls for a first year of Uni and then you would have the whole 'student experience' without the travel burden? If you need to, ask a teacher or similar to help you - talk to your family etc.
Original post by courtcraze
Hi, I currently have offers for LLB Law from: University of Liverpool, University of Central Lancashire, University of Salford, and University of Bradford. I am struggling to decide where to go.
Is it advantageous for me to choose a russell group uni (in my case Liverpool) or somewhere else? Would choosing a russell group university put me at an advantage and if I don't will it pose as a disadvantage when applying for jobs as I heard graduates from russell group universities are more sought after.
I want to definitely live at home due to the financial costs and other factors involved. However, this would mean that I would be travelling for a total of 4 hours everyday (outgoing and return) if I want to go to Liverpool.
However, I don't want to go to a closer university that could potentially put me at a disadvantage when looking at job prospects.
The closest universities to me are Salford and Bradford but both are ranked really low for Law.
UCLAN is also far from me totalling 4 hours (outgoing and return).
My main concern is that I want to go to a good university that is ranked high for Law and one that supports their students and the professors and lecturers are nice. If you are reading my post and study Law at the universities mentioned above especially The University of Liverpool, could you drop me a message if you don't mind.
I am the first in my family to go to university and I am not familiar with the university experience in The UK. I would really appreciate if someone could advice me.
Thank you

Hey @courtcraze,

Choosing the right university involves making many small decisions that ultimately lead to the right choice.

When I was deciding on where to study Theatre, I focused heavily on the rankings of different drama schools and universities. However, during my research, I came to the realisation that while rankings are important, they shouldn't be the only factor in my decision-making process.

For me, I made my final decision to study at Salford based on the open day, seeing the facilities meeting my possible tutors and getting the "feel of the place". So my top tip would be to go and physically visit as many of those places you've mentioned and ask people these questions you have about going into the career you want to.

When it comes to choosing the right university, it's important to also remember that universities also want to be the right fit for you. There's no point in attending a university to study for a degree if it doesn't fully align with your goals and interests.

If you have any more questions, I'm more then happy to help!

Katie😀
(Offical Salford Rep)
Original post by courtcraze
Hi, I currently have offers for LLB Law from: University of Liverpool, University of Central Lancashire, University of Salford, and University of Bradford. I am struggling to decide where to go.
Is it advantageous for me to choose a russell group uni (in my case Liverpool) or somewhere else? Would choosing a russell group university put me at an advantage and if I don't will it pose as a disadvantage when applying for jobs as I heard graduates from russell group universities are more sought after.
I want to definitely live at home due to the financial costs and other factors involved. However, this would mean that I would be travelling for a total of 4 hours everyday (outgoing and return) if I want to go to Liverpool.
However, I don't want to go to a closer university that could potentially put me at a disadvantage when looking at job prospects.
The closest universities to me are Salford and Bradford but both are ranked really low for Law.
UCLAN is also far from me totalling 4 hours (outgoing and return).
My main concern is that I want to go to a good university that is ranked high for Law and one that supports their students and the professors and lecturers are nice. If you are reading my post and study Law at the universities mentioned above especially The University of Liverpool, could you drop me a message if you don't mind.
I am the first in my family to go to university and I am not familiar with the university experience in The UK. I would really appreciate if someone could advice me.
Thank you

Hey @courtcraze :smile:

Huge congratulations on all your offers!! That's amazing 😀

Like Katie said it's important to visit open days and get a feel for each of the universities and have that chance to speak one on one to the academics who'll be teaching you and also the current students on the course. Whilst it needs to be your decision alone, it definitely helps speaking to students about their genuine experiences, so if you'd like I can contact the law faculty admin and see if we can put you in contact with a current student on the course? I know you mentioned you'd like to hear from students from each uni so happy to try and help!

Good luck with making your decision, I'm sure you'll make the right decision for you!

Becky
Reply 5
You will be beyond fed up travelling 4 hours a day. Especially if this includes trains that are forever getting cancelled and delayed. Sometimes, being at the best university isn't everything. You will be around many other strong students, and can often become a number in a large crowd. Consider class sizes, talk to lecturers, join whattsap and social media groups and see if you connect with other students from a uni. Part of success at university is social support. There's so many other things to consider other than which is the best in ranks. Test doing the journey for a week at peak times and see if you aren't driven insane. Go to each campus and see if you can see yourself there.
Original post by courtcraze
Hi, I currently have offers for LLB Law from: University of Liverpool, University of Central Lancashire, University of Salford, and University of Bradford. I am struggling to decide where to go.
Is it advantageous for me to choose a russell group uni (in my case Liverpool) or somewhere else? Would choosing a russell group university put me at an advantage and if I don't will it pose as a disadvantage when applying for jobs as I heard graduates from russell group universities are more sought after.
I want to definitely live at home due to the financial costs and other factors involved. However, this would mean that I would be travelling for a total of 4 hours everyday (outgoing and return) if I want to go to Liverpool.
However, I don't want to go to a closer university that could potentially put me at a disadvantage when looking at job prospects.
The closest universities to me are Salford and Bradford but both are ranked really low for Law.
UCLAN is also far from me totalling 4 hours (outgoing and return).
My main concern is that I want to go to a good university that is ranked high for Law and one that supports their students and the professors and lecturers are nice. If you are reading my post and study Law at the universities mentioned above especially The University of Liverpool, could you drop me a message if you don't mind.
I am the first in my family to go to university and I am not familiar with the university experience in The UK. I would really appreciate if someone could advice me.
Thank you

Hi @courtcraze

I'm a current student at UCLan and know a few people who study law so hopefully I can help you.

When choosing a university for a subject like Law, I think it is really important to see what the university can offer you in terms of extra-curricular actives outside lectures that are related to your subject. For example, at UCLan we have our Advice and Resolution Centre (ARC) that students can get involved with. This is great for showcasing some real world experience on your CV after you graduate.

From speaking to students, there are lots of staff who have different contacts as well to help you get started in the law world.

As for traveling, I'm putting together a thread on living at home vs living at university so once that is up, I'll pop back and link it here for you!

I hope this helps,

Rebecca, UCLan
Original post by courtcraze
Hi, I currently have offers for LLB Law from: University of Liverpool, University of Central Lancashire, University of Salford, and University of Bradford. I am struggling to decide where to go.
Is it advantageous for me to choose a russell group uni (in my case Liverpool) or somewhere else? Would choosing a russell group university put me at an advantage and if I don't will it pose as a disadvantage when applying for jobs as I heard graduates from russell group universities are more sought after.
I want to definitely live at home due to the financial costs and other factors involved. However, this would mean that I would be travelling for a total of 4 hours everyday (outgoing and return) if I want to go to Liverpool.
However, I don't want to go to a closer university that could potentially put me at a disadvantage when looking at job prospects.
The closest universities to me are Salford and Bradford but both are ranked really low for Law.
UCLAN is also far from me totalling 4 hours (outgoing and return).
My main concern is that I want to go to a good university that is ranked high for Law and one that supports their students and the professors and lecturers are nice. If you are reading my post and study Law at the universities mentioned above especially The University of Liverpool, could you drop me a message if you don't mind.
I am the first in my family to go to university and I am not familiar with the university experience in The UK. I would really appreciate if someone could advice me.
Thank you

I am not part of the camp that supports young people living at home during uni unless due to significant family commitments such as being carers for example. Hence, I would suggest that you consider living at uni and develop independence.

For unis, as other members have noted, I would suggest that you pick the strongest uni based on rep and quality of uni. A RG uni would be better imho.

Good luck
Reply 8
Original post by Wired_1800
I am not part of the camp that supports young people living at home during uni unless due to significant family commitments such as being carers for example. Hence, I would suggest that you consider living at uni and develop independence.
For unis, as other members have noted, I would suggest that you pick the strongest uni based on rep and quality of uni. A RG uni would be better imho.
Good luck

Some young people really struggle away from the family set up during uni years. Its really a personal choice. One person i knew excelled in ALevels, got into an RG uni, went unpacked, got so anxious being away from hoe, they packed back up and did not even start. OP - Do what's best for you, and not what other people consider normal.
Original post by jmachin6
Some young people really struggle away from the family set up during uni years. Its really a personal choice. One person i knew excelled in ALevels, got into an RG uni, went unpacked, got so anxious being away from hoe, they packed back up and did not even start. OP - Do what's best for you, and not what other people consider normal.

University life provides the transition for young people to lead independent lives. To me, it is dangerous for one to simply go back home when they feel some pressure. I think it is this approach that has led to the dependency culture that one can see among the younger generations who seem to lack the ability to function as independent adults.

If there is a medical reason why one cannot learn to live an independent life with their peers in a space for about 3 years, that’s different and should be considered on a case by case basis. For the rest, I’d strongly suggest that they should live at uni with their peers and start on their journey.

PS: this is just my opinion. I went to boarding school, so my life experience would be different to others.
University MAY be the transition for some but not all. You also have to remember that two years before uni, young people are at strict high schools that don't even let them breathe without permission, they have no say in anything let alone independence. There is nothing wrong with not being ready to leave home at 18, and doing it before they are ready can be more harmful and create a damaging need of dependency for fear of it going wrong again in the future. It doesn't need to just be medical grounds, its a process of self evolution that you go through at your own pace and not dictated by socitieties constructs of age appropriateness. Being independent and self sufficient at 18 is a social construct forced on everyone that is often unrealistic. When young people can't meet these constructs, they feel like failures. Some will be dying to leave home at 18, and some won't be ready for a few more years. But what ever the situation, its all OK.
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by jmachin6
University MAY be the transition for some but not all. You also have to remember that two years before uni, young people are at strict high schools that don't even let them breathe without permission, they have no say in anything let alone independence. There is nothing wrong with not being ready to leave home at 18, and doing it before they are ready can be more harmful and create a damaging need of dependency for fear of it going wrong again in the future. It doesn't need to just be medical grounds, its a process of self evolution that you go through at your own pace and not dictated by socitieties constructs of age appropriateness. Being independent and self sufficient is a social construct forced on everyone that is often unrealistic. When young people can't meet these constructs, they feel like failures. Some will be dying to leave home at 18, and some won't be ready for a few more years. But what ever the situation, its all OK.

Of course, not for all. I don't believe in absolutes. Yes, there are people who would still require time to mature, that’s fair. I’ve met some students who had their laundry sent back home whilst at uni bearing in mind that we had large free laundry rooms in our college, even some had their mama visiting with food parcels because they refused to eat the food and could not make food for themselves, so I am well aware of the maturity curve.

I disagree with your point that being independent and self sufficient is a social construct. A man still living in his parents’ house because he is unable to fend for himself (without any special needs) wont be dismissed as fine.

Anyway, like I previously stated, it is my opinion. If one chooses to live in their family home whilst their peers live at uni, i have no choice in that. If i am asked, i think they should live at uni and commence the transition. To me, it should be the default unless exceptions arise as aforementioned.
Original post by Wired_1800
Of course, not for all. I don't believe in absolutes. Yes, there are people who would still require time to mature, that’s fair. I’ve met some students who had their laundry sent back home whilst at uni bearing in mind that we had large free laundry rooms in our college, even some had their mama visiting with food parcels because they refused to eat the food and could not make food for themselves, so I am well aware of the maturity curve.
I disagree with your point that being independent and self sufficient is a social construct. A man still living in his parents’ house because he is unable to fend for himself (without any special needs) wont be dismissed as fine.
Anyway, like I previously stated, it is my opinion. If one chooses to live in their family home whilst their peers live at uni, i have no choice in that. If i am asked, i think they should live at uni and commence the transition. To me, it should be the default unless exceptions arise as aforementioned.

It's a social construct that it happens by 18. Not that it happens at all. It's a social construct that 18 is when a person reaches adulthood and expected to be independent.
Original post by jmachin6
It's a social construct that it happens by 18. Not that it happens at all. It's a social construct that 18 is when a person reaches adulthood and expected to be independent.
Nobody said that an 18 year old is expected to be fully independent, hence the initial comment about it being a transition.

I’d suggest that you read my initial post again.
Original post by wired_1800
Nobody said that an 18 year old is expected to be fully independent, hence the initial comment about it being a transition.
I’d suggest that you read my initial post again.

You basically said all 18 year olds should leave and go to uni and thats the only way you think is acceptable unless they have medical grounds, which adds pressure on some that isnt necessary. I'm not replying again. It's one thing to have opinions, but not to force them on someone who has already decided they are commuting.
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by jmachin6
You basically said all 18 year olds should leave and go to uni and thats the only way you think is acceptable unless they have medical grounds, which adds pressure on some that isnt necessary. I'm not replying again. It's one thing to have opinions, but not to force them on someone who has already decided they are commuting.

Yes and I stand on that. Unless there are exceptions, i think young people who have chosen to go to uni should consider living at uni.

I am not forcing any opinions hence why i said it is an opinion.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending