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University of Law - Online Law Conversion

Hi. I am looking to study with the University of Law applying for the MA Online Law (Conversion). This is a one year course but can be completed part time.
I work full time therefore was going to apply for the part time option to spread out over 2 years. However, has anyone completed the course within a year alongside full time employment? Or are the demands too high? Thanks!
Hi. I am looking to study with the University of Law applying for the MA Online Law (Conversion). This is a one year course but can be completed part time.
I work full time therefore was going to apply for the part time option to spread out over 2 years. However, has anyone completed the course within a year alongside full time employment? Or are the demands too high? Thanks!

Hi @rcal

I did the course last year and there were around 5 people who started the course whilst working full time. 2 of these students decided that the course combined with their work was too much and, therefore, either moved to part time or quit their job/moved their job to part time hours. However, the other 3 did complete the entire course and maintained their jobs. From my understanding, this obviously wasn't easy and they had to make some sacrifices in relation to other aspects of their life but it is possible, particularly if you are organised.

What I would recommend, is starting it full time if you think you will be able to manage and just being prepared to move to part-time if needed (it is relatively easy to make this switch).

I hope this helps and good luck! 🙂
Mock Trial
The University of Law
Visit website
Hi. I am looking to study with the University of Law applying for the MA Online Law (Conversion). This is a one year course but can be completed part time.
I work full time therefore was going to apply for the part time option to spread out over 2 years. However, has anyone completed the course within a year alongside full time employment? Or are the demands too high? Thanks!

Hi @rcal, I have just completed my MA Conversion online whilst working full time.

I think the main thing to consider is your learning style and whether or not you are okay with feeling behind at times. I did not have any issues with completing both the course and working full time, but I had to be quite disciplined with how and when I studied. For some context, you'll have 4 modules per semester and each module will consist usually of 8 units. It works out roughly that you complete one unit for each module per week. To 'complete' the unit, you are given three things to work through - Prepare tasks, Engage tasks and Consolidate tasks. For each unit it is intended to take a few hours. On top of the live lectures (if you can attend) and the reading that is included, it works out around 20 hours a week.

However, the main thing I learnt is focus on what you're being assessed on and how you will be assessed. You do not need to stay 'on top' of every single unit each week in order to do well in assessments. The weekly work provides great resources for learning how to tackle problem questions and introducing content but fundamentally, the textbooks cover all the content you'll be examined on. If you were able to cover 4 chapters a week (one chapter for each unit, 4 units per week) you would likely be fine.

You are assessed in January and again in May. For each module, you have two assessments. You will get multiple choice questions (called SBAQs) for each module alongside a longer exam. For two modules, these longer exams are timed written exams. For the other two, one is coursework and one is an oral exam. You get your questions for these last two exams in early December. You can imagine that when you get these questions, it is relatively easy to streamline your efforts to the relevant units and you can do very well without knowing all 8 units by that time.

Additionally, you will have a long period of time between finishing teaching each semester and the exams themselves (3 weeks to a month). You can definitely get through a few units over this time and 'catch up' if you needed to.

This was what I did each week that worked for me. I ended up reading the relevant textbook chapter for each unit each week, digesting the info and making super condensed notes. I would then try all of the SBAQ quizzes for that unit given in the Engage/Consolidate folders. I then compiled all SBAQs I completed into a doc so I could revise from these before exams (often it is styles of questions you learn to recognize, not the content!). I also prepared my oral/coursework as soon as possible after getting the questions but kept reminding myself you don't need longer/in depth notes or problem question plans for these modules as they do not have that element so you do not need to do all the P/E/Cs. For the other modules that do have the written exams, you mainly need to write out comprehensive plans for problem question structures you can use in the exams. All in all, I only really spent about 5-7 hours a week doing these things, with more intense work in the month before exams. I found that it was fine doing both and managed to do well, too.

However, if you think you could find it stressful not completing all weekly tasks or might feel behind taking that approach, maybe part-time would be better (nothing is worth being super stressed for!). But if you think you could adopt a very pragmatic style, I would definitely say you would be fine to do both and it means you can get your degree sooner so you can move onto SQE1/2 and Training Contracts (if you choose to).

Sorry for the long response! Hopefully that makes sense and gives more insight. I was in the same position and it would have been helpful to know these things. Whichever you choose, I am sure it will be alright. I hope you enjoy the course - I did! Feel free to reach out if you have any more questions. Best of luck.

Stephanie
Reply 3
Original post by UniofLaw Student
Hi @rcal
I did the course last year and there were around 5 people who started the course whilst working full time. 2 of these students decided that the course combined with their work was too much and, therefore, either moved to part time or quit their job/moved their job to part time hours. However, the other 3 did complete the entire course and maintained their jobs. From my understanding, this obviously wasn't easy and they had to make some sacrifices in relation to other aspects of their life but it is possible, particularly if you are organised.
What I would recommend, is starting it full time if you think you will be able to manage and just being prepared to move to part-time if needed (it is relatively easy to make this switch).
I hope this helps and good luck! 🙂

Thank you so much for taking the time to respond - it has been really useful! :smile:
Reply 4
Original post by s.tephlouise
Hi @rcal, I have just completed my MA Conversion online whilst working full time.
I think the main thing to consider is your learning style and whether or not you are okay with feeling behind at times. I did not have any issues with completing both the course and working full time, but I had to be quite disciplined with how and when I studied. For some context, you'll have 4 modules per semester and each module will consist usually of 8 units. It works out roughly that you complete one unit for each module per week. To 'complete' the unit, you are given three things to work through - Prepare tasks, Engage tasks and Consolidate tasks. For each unit it is intended to take a few hours. On top of the live lectures (if you can attend) and the reading that is included, it works out around 20 hours a week.
However, the main thing I learnt is focus on what you're being assessed on and how you will be assessed. You do not need to stay 'on top' of every single unit each week in order to do well in assessments. The weekly work provides great resources for learning how to tackle problem questions and introducing content but fundamentally, the textbooks cover all the content you'll be examined on. If you were able to cover 4 chapters a week (one chapter for each unit, 4 units per week) you would likely be fine.
You are assessed in January and again in May. For each module, you have two assessments. You will get multiple choice questions (called SBAQs) for each module alongside a longer exam. For two modules, these longer exams are timed written exams. For the other two, one is coursework and one is an oral exam. You get your questions for these last two exams in early December. You can imagine that when you get these questions, it is relatively easy to streamline your efforts to the relevant units and you can do very well without knowing all 8 units by that time.
Additionally, you will have a long period of time between finishing teaching each semester and the exams themselves (3 weeks to a month). You can definitely get through a few units over this time and 'catch up' if you needed to.
This was what I did each week that worked for me. I ended up reading the relevant textbook chapter for each unit each week, digesting the info and making super condensed notes. I would then try all of the SBAQ quizzes for that unit given in the Engage/Consolidate folders. I then compiled all SBAQs I completed into a doc so I could revise from these before exams (often it is styles of questions you learn to recognize, not the content!). I also prepared my oral/coursework as soon as possible after getting the questions but kept reminding myself you don't need longer/in depth notes or problem question plans for these modules as they do not have that element so you do not need to do all the P/E/Cs. For the other modules that do have the written exams, you mainly need to write out comprehensive plans for problem question structures you can use in the exams. All in all, I only really spent about 5-7 hours a week doing these things, with more intense work in the month before exams. I found that it was fine doing both and managed to do well, too.
However, if you think you could find it stressful not completing all weekly tasks or might feel behind taking that approach, maybe part-time would be better (nothing is worth being super stressed for!). But if you think you could adopt a very pragmatic style, I would definitely say you would be fine to do both and it means you can get your degree sooner so you can move onto SQE1/2 and Training Contracts (if you choose to).
Sorry for the long response! Hopefully that makes sense and gives more insight. I was in the same position and it would have been helpful to know these things. Whichever you choose, I am sure it will be alright. I hope you enjoy the course - I did! Feel free to reach out if you have any more questions. Best of luck.
Stephanie

Hello - thank you so so much for such a detailed reply! It's been so useful getting your feedback and really helped making my decision - thank you :smile:

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