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St Andrews V Edinburgh V UCl

Hi guys, I am a sottish student currently in my last year of school and I have three offers from, St Andrews, Edinburgh and UCl, all for economics. As of now I am interested in going into banking, and I am really struggling to pick out of the three. In Scotland we get free education for Scottish universities so my question is, would it be worth moving to London and paying the tuition costs to try to secure a job in banking from UCL or would I have the same opportunities in either Edinburgh or St Andrews, for context I can see my self living in either of the universities and I would be willing to take on student debt if it had the opportunity of a more lucrative career.
Original post by joshin
Hi guys, I am a sottish student currently in my last year of school and I have three offers from, St Andrews, Edinburgh and UCl, all for economics. As of now I am interested in going into banking, and I am really struggling to pick out of the three. In Scotland we get free education for Scottish universities so my question is, would it be worth moving to London and paying the tuition costs to try to secure a job in banking from UCL or would I have the same opportunities in either Edinburgh or St Andrews, for context I can see my self living in either of the universities and I would be willing to take on student debt if it had the opportunity of a more lucrative career.

If you are specific on banking and finance, then UCL should be the best for the network and proximity to the companies.
Reply 2
Appreciate the response mate, as I have conditional from UCL and unconditional from both edi and St Andrews which of the two Scottish uni’s do you think would be better as an insurance choice?
Original post by joshin
Appreciate the response mate, as I have conditional from UCL and unconditional from both edi and St Andrews which of the two Scottish uni’s do you think would be better as an insurance choice?

No worries, mate. It would depend on which uni culture you would prefer. As you know Edi and Andrews are very different places. If you are more of a city-type go for Edinburgh. If you are more of a more relaxed vibe then Andrews is your choice.

I have no direct experience of either Andrews or Edinburgh but the communities would widely differ. You should also consider costs and social life.

Here is a video that I liked from a Scottish lad who talked about his uni selection experience. it is a short video

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KJ3jQe7k3MU

If you have more questions, let me know.
Reply 4
UCL economics is almost certainly worth the money as long as you recruit well
Reply 5
Original post by Wired_1800
No worries, mate. It would depend on which uni culture you would prefer. As you know Edi and Andrews are very different places. If you are more of a city-type go for Edinburgh. If you are more of a more relaxed vibe then Andrews is your choice.
I have no direct experience of either Andrews or Edinburgh but the communities would widely differ. You should also consider costs and social life.
Here is a video that I liked from a Scottish lad who talked about his uni selection experience. it is a short video
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KJ3jQe7k3MU
If you have more questions, let me know.
Nice one, so you would you say that neither of those universities would give me a significant advantage?
Reply 6
Original post by joshin
Nice one, so you would you say that neither of those universities would give me a significant advantage?

St.A and Edinburgh both are relative semi-targets for finance. if you wanted to stay in Scotland for the cheaper fees then the difference is negligible, go for what u think will be the best experience for you.

However, I think for the extra 30-40k you would pay to go to UCL - the payback over time would 100% be worth it. If you went to a uni in Scotland you'd be likely ending up working in Edinburgh rather than london. UCL Econ is a sure fire into any top investment bank / management consultancy ( check linkedin for the proof). Plus UCL is a really fun uni - its not full of hardcore people at LSE or Imperial. So in my opinion its a good investment
Reply 7
There's a lot of misinformation in this thread. Edinburgh has been teaching Economics for over 200 years, longer than any primarily English speaking university. Its on target graduate prospects for this subject is 91%, higher than St Andrews (84%) and UCL (81%). To be fair, UCL's research quality for this subject is higher (90% at UCL, 82% at Edinburgh. 74% at St Andrews). Source: www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 8
Original post by Picnicl
There's a lot of misinformation in this thread. Edinburgh has been teaching Economics for over 200 years, longer than any primarily English speaking university. Its on target graduate prospects for this subject is 91%, higher than St Andrews (84%) and UCL (81%). To be fair, UCL's research quality for this subject is higher (90% at UCL, 82% at Edinburgh. 74% at St Andrews). Source: www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk
lmao no its not . the fact you base graduate prospects off a percentage on uni rankings shows this. other rankings (such as QS) will place UCL ahead of edinburgh .

its quite a well known fact that in the finance sphere, UCL is a ‘target’ university (alongside oxbridge lse and imperial) whilst edinburgh and st andrews fall firmly into the semi target bracket. if you check other forums eg wall street oasis its laid out more clearly there
Original post by joshin
Nice one, so you would you say that neither of those universities would give me a significant advantage?

UCL is your firm choice, which you should aim to secure in the first instance. The insurance choice, in my humble opinion, does not really matter between Andrews and Edinburgh.

I think the choice would be on your personal preferences as i think both unis are already strong options. It would depend on the student culture and environment that you would want to live in. Both are very different places.
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by an1342
lmao no its not . the fact you base graduate prospects off a percentage on uni rankings shows this. other rankings (such as QS) will place UCL ahead of edinburgh .
its quite a well known fact that in the finance sphere, UCL is a ‘target’ university (alongside oxbridge lse and imperial) whilst edinburgh and st andrews fall firmly into the semi target bracket. if you check other forums eg wall street oasis its laid out more clearly there

The quality of your post is such that your sentence 'lmao no it's not' doesn't pair to anything I said. Did you assume that I'd said something synonymous with 'therefore Edinburgh is definitely better'? I didn't. I even included something that is in UCL's favour.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 11
Original post by Picnicl
There's a lot of misinformation in this thread. Edinburgh has been teaching Economics for over 200 years, longer than any primarily English speaking university. Its on target graduate prospects for this subject is 91%, higher than St Andrews (84%) and UCL (81%). To be fair, UCL's research quality for this subject is higher (90% at UCL, 82% at Edinburgh. 74% at St Andrews). Source: www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk

Interesting perspective, from what I have learnt through friends and family/ research, that St Andrew's pips Edinburgh due to it being more 'prestigious' which would attracts a good network of students, however not sure how much of a difference this make.
Original post by joshin
Interesting perspective, from what I have learnt through friends and family/ research, that St Andrew's pips Edinburgh due to it being more 'prestigious' which would attracts a good network of students, however not sure how much of a difference this make.

But that's the thing. Your friends and family presumably aren't employers in banking. St Andrews is broadly comparable with Durham academically for all subjects on average. And a lot of private school students like them, sometimes regardless of how good the university actually is for that subject. There is a valid point that some students may get a lot from St Andrews style but is a quiet sea-swept place a natural breeding ground for economists? I don't feel that so much.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 13
Loving the advice guys which I will obviously take inline with my circumstances, hypothetically taking student experience out of the equation, between Edinburgh and St Andrews would they be on par, I am aware of the fact people will have their own preferences but objectively speaking is one better than the other?
Original post by joshin
Loving the advice guys which I will obviously take inline with my circumstances, hypothetically taking student experience out of the equation, between Edinburgh and St Andrews would they be on par, I am aware of the fact people will have their own preferences but objectively speaking is one better than the other?

Edinburgh has already been demonstrated by my quoted stats to be objectively better for Economics than St Andrews. (Edinburgh is also objectively better on average overall as a university - 76% of Edinburgh staff conduct high quality research (at St Andrews it's 71%) Research quality overall is 85% at Edinburgh. At St Andrews it's 83%. Source: www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk). If you have visited St Andrews and would rather study there than anywhere else, remember that the Scottish system allows you to study more than 1 subject and then later specialise (or do joint honours if you wish). (Personally, neither environment would be quite right for me as I like cities with a medium sized population. I'd have been likely looking at Nottingham, which currently has the 5th best research quality in the UK for Economics - 88%, and graduate on target prospects of 84%. Or Leeds, which is currently joint top with Edinburgh for graduate on target prospects for Economics - 91%, and Leeds is on 86% for research quality for Economics).
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 15
Original post by Picnicl
But that's the thing. Your friends and family presumably aren't employers in banking. St Andrews is broadly comparable with Durham academically for all subjects on average. And a lot of private school students like them, sometimes regardless of how good the university actually is for that subject. There is a valid point that some students may get a lot from St Andrews style but is a quiet sea-swept place a natural breeding ground for economists? I don't feel that so much.
Appreciate your insight mate!

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