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"I am not responsible for the wellbeing of others"

I observed that this phrase often came from narcissists or those with such tendency to justify their lack of empathy. Ironically, they tend to get angry whenever others act the way they prefer, and go on to accuse them of different things.

What do you think?
Original post by Anonymous
I observed that this phrase often came from narcissists or those with such tendency to justify their lack of empathy. Ironically, they tend to get angry whenever others act the way they prefer, and go on to accuse them of different things.
What do you think?

This reminds me of a phrase mentioned by a Hamas leader regarding the welfare of the Gazan citizens, whom they are supposed to care for due to their elected roles.

Whilst the phrase is somewhat true for individuals, it shows a lack of empathy as you said. Whilst some detachment is healthy, complete detachment is not. There should be a balance.

They tend to get angry whenever overs act they way they prefer - I agree. It's likely a form of projection; typically hypocritical. I think it might stem from their low self esteem and negative self image, but that's more of a speculation more than anything.

Having said that, you are not responsible for the wellbeing of narcissists. They are probably the last people who you would be concerned with, unless you are unfortunate enough to have them as your boss..
Those are negative interpretations, albeit understandable ones where someone deliberately hurts the feelings of another and blames them for their reaction.

To play Devil's advocate, there is a positive interpretation.

Some people guilt trip, manipulate and emotionally blackmail others by foregrounding their well-being issues.

This can lead to them being abusive to others, excusing their behaviour by saying it is because they suffer from X condition.


That's why Domestic Abuse campaigns send out the message 'There's no excuse for abuse'.

It is common for violent and abusive partners who justify their behaviour on their well being and health conditions.

Survivors of this type of abuse are encouraged to see that their partners are responsible for all their behaviour and their wellbeing issues are not legitimate reasons to be abusive.
Reply 3
It depends on the context and the speaker's definition of wellbeing. Or is it not being responsible for others' emotions?
Reply 4
Original post by Surnia
It depends on the context and the speaker's definition of wellbeing. Or is it not being responsible for others' emotions?

What if the person's actions are harming people's emotions?
Reply 5
Original post by Anonymous
Those are negative interpretations, albeit understandable ones where someone deliberately hurts the feelings of another and blames them for their reaction.
To play Devil's advocate, there is a positive interpretation.
Some people guilt trip, manipulate and emotionally blackmail others by foregrounding their well-being issues.
This can lead to them being abusive to others, excusing their behaviour by saying it is because they suffer from X condition.
That's why Domestic Abuse campaigns send out the message 'There's no excuse for abuse'.
It is common for violent and abusive partners who justify their behaviour on their well being and health conditions.
Survivors of this type of abuse are encouraged to see that their partners are responsible for all their behaviour and their wellbeing issues are not legitimate reasons to be abusive.

So it is "abusive" to speak up for themselves when their wellbeing are being maliciously harmed by others?
Reply 6
Original post by Anonymous
What if the person's actions are harming people's emotions?

The actions may be viewed as harming emotions when they actually aren't. As I said, it depends on the context.

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