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Halifax is closing my account, I am a victim of fraud. please what can i do

Hi,

Halifax is closing my account because the detected fraud money in my account. it would be closed in less than 60 days. This is what happened.

I was asked to receive a particular amount of money into my account and i was convinced the money was legal because i asked the person and he told me it was legal.

After receiving the money, my account was restricted and i was sent a message that my account was going to be closed. The money was refunded but my account is still going to be closed.

I went to the branch and explained everything to them and also showed them a screenshot of the guy telling me it is legal money but they still insisted on closing my account.

I have gone through some platforms and saw that if my account gets closed, i will have a CIFAS marker.

Please how can i prevent this from happening before my bank is closed? and if it eventually closes and i have a CIFAS marker, how can i dispute it? because i have made a mistake of accepting fraud money into my account and had no idea

Thank you
Reply 1
You aren't a victim of fraud, you are potentially guilty of money laundering.

Do you know the person who sent you the money, what did they ask you to do with it other than accept it? Of course they would say it's legal; they aren't going to say they were doing something criminal, would they? Terms and Conditions are there for a reason...
Reply 2
Original post by Surnia
You aren't a victim of fraud, you are potentially guilty of money laundering.
Do you know the person who sent you the money, what did they ask you to do with it other than accept it? Of course they would say it's legal; they aren't going to say they were doing something criminal, would they? Terms and Conditions are there for a reason...

I do not really know the person, a friend introduced him to me. I was asked to just convert the money into Naira with a third app.

Please what can i do?
Reply 3
Original post by k.am
I do not really know the person, a friend introduced him to me. I was asked to just convert the money into Naira with a third app.
Please what can i do?

All you can do is ditch your friend for hanging out with shady characters and do some research into which financial organisations may accept you for a bank account.

After what you've said there is no 'potentially'; you are guilty of money laundering and there is nothing to dispute.
As above, not a lot you can do now, this request should have set very loud alarms ringing, you are not a currency exchange.

You knew enough to ask if it was legal but should have looked elsewhere for an answer, rather than the person who wants you to do the thing.
Reply 5
Original post by StriderHort
As above, not a lot you can do now, this request should have set very loud alarms ringing, you are not a currency exchange.
You knew enough to ask if it was legal but should have looked elsewhere for an answer, rather than the person who wants you to do the thing.

the marker is not yet on my name, can i contact financial ombudsman and explain the matter before i get the marker
Original post by k.am
the marker is not yet on my name, can i contact financial ombudsman and explain the matter before i get the marker

Basically no, I'm not seeing any grounds to take to the Ombudsman. That is only really effective if you can prove the bank made a mistake and treated you unfairly and you would need to wait at least to see what marker they applied. But I don't see what you can appeal on, the banks position will almost certainly be that you should have known this was suspicious/money laundering and you are linked to fraud.
Reply 7
Original post by k.am
the marker is not yet on my name, can i contact financial ombudsman and explain the matter before i get the marker

You will need to go through the bank's complaints process before you can go to the Financial Ombudsman Service: https://www.financial-ombudsman.org.uk/consumers/how-to-complain/complain-financial-business

You can complain about the bank's decision to close your account.

If/when a Cifas marker is applied, you can complain about that decision separately.

But based on what you've said, it does sound like closing your account and applying a Cifas marker would be reasonable things for a responsible bank to do.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 8
Original post by k.am
the marker is not yet on my name, can i contact financial ombudsman and explain the matter before i get the marker

"I gave out my bank details to a stranger so he could arrange to transfer money into then out of my account. I did it because he said it was legal."

How do you think that is going to sound to the Ombudsman; clue: it's not going to make things better for you? Did you not wonder why someone couldn't convert currency using his own bank account?
Reply 9
Original post by Surnia
"I gave out my bank details to a stranger so he could arrange to transfer money into then out of my account. I did it because he said it was legal."
How do you think that is going to sound to the Ombudsman; clue: it's not going to make things better for you? Did you not wonder why someone couldn't convert currency using his own bank account?

He is in nigeria so he does not have a pounds account. i was also convinced because as he sent the money i asked for a receipt and he sent it
Reply 10
Original post by k.am
He is in nigeria so he does not have a pounds account. i was also convinced because as he sent the money i asked for a receipt and he sent it

How do you think other people across the world manage without a 'pounds account', which doesn't even make sense in this context. You do know they have money exchanges in other countries? And software that allows a fake receipt to be created?

The mere mention of Nigeria says 'scam'...
(edited 1 month ago)
Agree with the above, being naive enough to fall for an obvious scam is just as concerning as being a fraudster. An account closure and cifas marker are about managing their risk, (and the risk to other banks that you may look to join).

All you can do is follow their complaints process, but if they’ve already seen related correspondence then you are purely relying on goodwill on the bank’s part.
Reply 12
Original post by Admit-One
Agree with the above, being naive enough to fall for an obvious scam is just as concerning as being a fraudster. An account closure and cifas marker are about managing their risk, (and the risk to other banks that you may look to join).
All you can do is follow their complaints process, but if they’ve already seen related correspondence then you are purely relying on goodwill on the bank’s part.

oh ok, i will go to the bank and follow their complaint process. Thank you
I will also take evidence(messages) that honestly I did not know the source of money was not legal.
Original post by k.am
oh ok, i will go to the bank and follow their complaint process. Thank you
I will also take evidence(messages) that honestly I did not know the source of money was not legal.

You might need to be more proactive than that, and describe what you thought was legal about it without it sounding totally stupid, as said above you can be held to account for being extremely reckless just as much as intentional fraud.

Some things I'd expect to come up are;

How do you know this person? (the fact you don't and they are in Nigeria looks v bad)
Why did they specifically need your help? They couldn't open a legitimate account themselves? or why wasn't your friend helping them?
What did you think the money was for? ie what was it's source and where was it going?
What details exactly did you give out? did you give them direct access to your accounts or the third party pp (what was this app?)
What if anything were you promised in return? On one hand saying you expected to be paid makes you more accountable but claiming you expected nothing stretches credibility a bit when it's already in doubt.
Are you aware of Nigeria's widespread record for fraud? I think a random payment from Nigeria would alert most UK banks tbh If I went and tried to even buy something from a legit Nigerian company online my bank would prob block it, no matter what I said.

As a footnote, you should be extremely suspicious of your 'friend' who introduced the two of you and gave you the idea, they've played you for a sucker and prob got you in serious financial trouble, I bet they didn't give over their account details.

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