The Student Room Group

GCSE English Literature essay Macbeth: Can someone please mark it?

Macbeth is a Jacobean play that illustrates the shortcomings of those with ambition. Where the patriarchal society is built on influence the way Lady Macbeth behaves, as well as highlighting her pitfalls. Shakespeare intends to communicate this to the audience through the abundant illustration of violence within Lady Macbeth as a character and play as a whole.

Shakespeare at the start of the play shows Lady Macbeth's dark nature through her wants and desires. Macbeth, after receiving a prophecy of his future, kingship tells Lady Macbeth about this through a letter. This letter sparks ambition within her here we see how she doesn’t believe Macbeth has the strength to bring them success. If she asks the spirits to “unsex me here”. Rather than wish to plague Macbeth with removing his “milk of human kindness” she wishes herself to become wicked. The use of the word “unsex” gives us insight into Lady Macbeth beliefs. Some may believe her reference to have sex may show how she believes that is what is holding her back from greatness. Moreover, the metaphor “make thick my blood” creates an illusion of tar, a black viscous substance that is unpleasant. Shakespeare creates disassociation to allow the audience to view Lady Macbeth as a sinister person. Moreover, the use of the verb “make” shows she doesn’t want a temporary exchange of power, rather a permanent one. Shakespeare intends to make a statement of how Lady Macbeth feels trapped in her role as a woman. Some however interpret this as her revealing herself as an evil friend of misconduct similar to the witches. Her desire for the spirits to “fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty!” is similar in tone to the iambic pentameter used by the witches in Act 1 Scene 1 fair is foul, and foul is fair through the fog and filthy air.”. By allowing the character of Lady Macbeth to be viewed in this way Shakespeare panders to the interests of King James Indirectly. In conclusion , the introduction of Lady Macbeth in act one scene five has shown her perspective on the inciting incident of the play as well as what she plans on doing in the future.

Shakspear shows the conniving and duplicate nature. Some may interpret this as the character of Lady Macbeth changing. To a Jacobean audience, this would be shocking, but also somewhat reaffirms their beliefs about women in power. by referring to Macbeth as “my dearest partner of greatness” she plays into his flattery. The use of the adjective “dearest” reminds both Macbeth and the audience of Lady Macbeth fondness of him, as well as presumably communicating her loyalty. In addition the use of the noun “greatness” to further allude to the idea of the power that both herself and Macbeth can receive. By opting to use the noun “greatness” rather than an adjective Shakspear intends to show Lady Macbeth’s view of power as something to acquire rather than to be bestowed upon or acquired. Alternatively and or in connection to the use of “greatness” has been used to further flatter Macbeth and make the pressation of killing king Duncan easier. This shows awareness for her wrong doing, somewhat disapproving the idea that she is wholly evil and or a witch. We can Lady Macbeth further manipulate Macbeth by emasculation and proving to be superior to him by the end of scene 7. She asks “art thou a man?” this rhetorical question affirms Lady Macbeth as authority within the relationship , being the one to ask questions.By applying the idea of manhood to something so outrageous like regicide further demonises the character of Lady Macbeth. Furthermore this bloodlust she feels and wants for power can lead the audience to believe that she is unfitting to receive it. To an audience at the time this would reinforce their preconceived assumptions on women and assert the belief it's better they remain docile and submissive. However, to us as a modern audience we are able to understand this outburst and vindictive attitude is most likely due to the oppression she feels due to the patriarchal society. In short Lady Macbeth develops in the perspective of the audience as we see her assertive nature shine through.

Shakespeare creates illusions of violence within the dialogue of Lady Macbeth. When confronting Macbeth on why he won't kill Duncan she retorts that she would “pluck its boneless gums from my bosom and bash its brains out”. The use of “boneless gums” shows the innocence of the child she is threatening to take action against. In addition the use of the noun “bosom” we are metaphorically seeing Lady Macbeth stripping away her role as a mother willingly. This would be shocking to an Jacobian audience as they would have viewed women as maternal figures. Some may interpret this as her being discontent with her presumed role as a mother and subsequently relinquish her femininity. What's more, the excessively violent phrase “bash its brains out” gives us insight into her twisted mind. This shows how truly disconnected Lady Macbeth is with her societal role as a woman. This could be due to the desirae she had proclaimed early in the play or just part of her nature. Shakespeare highlights Lady Macbeth's blood thirst and violent nature through her dialogue due to her inability to act upon them.

In the extract lady macbeth is presented to be disoriented in her mad state. In the scene we are introduced to a Gentlewoman and Doctor watching Lady Macbeth sleepwalking. She says “Out, damned spot!”. The use of the imperative “out” shows the urgency of the situation she is facing. Moreover the command alludes to the more conniving , powerful self she used to be. The use of the noun “out” reflects a sense of permanency. The “spot” holds a purpose both metaphorical and literal. On one hand the “spot” represents the real spot of blood left on her hands after returning the daggers of the guards. On the other hand this “spot” personifies the guilt she feels for the part she plates in Duncan's death. This delirious state she is in now breaks down any previous notions the audience would have had about her. Shakespeare intends to show vulnerability within her as well as show the consequences of her actions. The doctor remarks “unnatural deeds breed unnatural troubles”. One interpretation of this statement could be that the “unnatural troubles'' referenced are the presumed incantations said by Lady Macbeth in Act 1. However this could also be seen as an upset in the world order, the regicide and subsequent disruption of the divine right of kings. At the time, much of the Jacobean audience would have been religious, meaning they would have seen Lady Macbeth's mental spiral as a sign of punishment sent by the divine. Moreover as a modern audience we recognize this idiom of “blood on one’s hands” as being a reference to guilt but also a conscience. Some may argue that she subconsciously is punishing herself through her sleepwalking. Through this scene Shakspeare is able to convey Lady Macbeth’s disoriented sense as well as her loss of power. In closing Act 5 Scene 1 Lady Macbeth is very different from how she acts in earlier parts of the play appearing to feel copies amounts of guilt rather than believing “a little water will wash this deed”.

In conclusion Lady Macbeth as a character does in fact change and develop throughout the play however I don't believe this is due to her own accord rather the environments she is forced to assimilate into. In the beginning we are shown she doesn't really want or is able to fit the role of a subservient wife of the era rather seeking power. Later on we see how this power that she so wanted has driven her mad. Shakespeare intends to show how a suppressive society can lead to the detriment of those in power.
Original post by chry36946785
Macbeth is a Jacobean play that illustrates the shortcomings of those with ambition. Where the patriarchal society is built on influence the way Lady Macbeth behaves, as well as highlighting her pitfalls. Shakespeare intends to communicate this to the audience through the abundant illustration of violence within Lady Macbeth as a character and play as a whole.
Shakespeare at the start of the play shows Lady Macbeth's dark nature through her wants and desires. Macbeth, after receiving a prophecy of his future, kingship tells Lady Macbeth about this through a letter. This letter sparks ambition within her here we see how she doesn’t believe Macbeth has the strength to bring them success. If she asks the spirits to “unsex me here”. Rather than wish to plague Macbeth with removing his “milk of human kindness” she wishes herself to become wicked. The use of the word “unsex” gives us insight into Lady Macbeth beliefs. Some may believe her reference to have sex may show how she believes that is what is holding her back from greatness. Moreover, the metaphor “make thick my blood” creates an illusion of tar, a black viscous substance that is unpleasant. Shakespeare creates disassociation to allow the audience to view Lady Macbeth as a sinister person. Moreover, the use of the verb “make” shows she doesn’t want a temporary exchange of power, rather a permanent one. Shakespeare intends to make a statement of how Lady Macbeth feels trapped in her role as a woman. Some however interpret this as her revealing herself as an evil friend of misconduct similar to the witches. Her desire for the spirits to “fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty!” is similar in tone to the iambic pentameter used by the witches in Act 1 Scene 1 fair is foul, and foul is fair through the fog and filthy air.”. By allowing the character of Lady Macbeth to be viewed in this way Shakespeare panders to the interests of King James Indirectly. In conclusion , the introduction of Lady Macbeth in act one scene five has shown her perspective on the inciting incident of the play as well as what she plans on doing in the future.
Shakspear shows the conniving and duplicate nature. Some may interpret this as the character of Lady Macbeth changing. To a Jacobean audience, this would be shocking, but also somewhat reaffirms their beliefs about women in power. by referring to Macbeth as “my dearest partner of greatness” she plays into his flattery. The use of the adjective “dearest” reminds both Macbeth and the audience of Lady Macbeth fondness of him, as well as presumably communicating her loyalty. In addition the use of the noun “greatness” to further allude to the idea of the power that both herself and Macbeth can receive. By opting to use the noun “greatness” rather than an adjective Shakspear intends to show Lady Macbeth’s view of power as something to acquire rather than to be bestowed upon or acquired. Alternatively and or in connection to the use of “greatness” has been used to further flatter Macbeth and make the pressation of killing king Duncan easier. This shows awareness for her wrong doing, somewhat disapproving the idea that she is wholly evil and or a witch. We can Lady Macbeth further manipulate Macbeth by emasculation and proving to be superior to him by the end of scene 7. She asks “art thou a man?” this rhetorical question affirms Lady Macbeth as authority within the relationship , being the one to ask questions.By applying the idea of manhood to something so outrageous like regicide further demonises the character of Lady Macbeth. Furthermore this bloodlust she feels and wants for power can lead the audience to believe that she is unfitting to receive it. To an audience at the time this would reinforce their preconceived assumptions on women and assert the belief it's better they remain docile and submissive. However, to us as a modern audience we are able to understand this outburst and vindictive attitude is most likely due to the oppression she feels due to the patriarchal society. In short Lady Macbeth develops in the perspective of the audience as we see her assertive nature shine through.
Shakespeare creates illusions of violence within the dialogue of Lady Macbeth. When confronting Macbeth on why he won't kill Duncan she retorts that she would “pluck its boneless gums from my bosom and bash its brains out”. The use of “boneless gums” shows the innocence of the child she is threatening to take action against. In addition the use of the noun “bosom” we are metaphorically seeing Lady Macbeth stripping away her role as a mother willingly. This would be shocking to an Jacobian audience as they would have viewed women as maternal figures. Some may interpret this as her being discontent with her presumed role as a mother and subsequently relinquish her femininity. What's more, the excessively violent phrase “bash its brains out” gives us insight into her twisted mind. This shows how truly disconnected Lady Macbeth is with her societal role as a woman. This could be due to the desirae she had proclaimed early in the play or just part of her nature. Shakespeare highlights Lady Macbeth's blood thirst and violent nature through her dialogue due to her inability to act upon them.
In the extract lady macbeth is presented to be disoriented in her mad state. In the scene we are introduced to a Gentlewoman and Doctor watching Lady Macbeth sleepwalking. She says “Out, damned spot!”. The use of the imperative “out” shows the urgency of the situation she is facing. Moreover the command alludes to the more conniving , powerful self she used to be. The use of the noun “out” reflects a sense of permanency. The “spot” holds a purpose both metaphorical and literal. On one hand the “spot” represents the real spot of blood left on her hands after returning the daggers of the guards. On the other hand this “spot” personifies the guilt she feels for the part she plates in Duncan's death. This delirious state she is in now breaks down any previous notions the audience would have had about her. Shakespeare intends to show vulnerability within her as well as show the consequences of her actions. The doctor remarks “unnatural deeds breed unnatural troubles”. One interpretation of this statement could be that the “unnatural troubles'' referenced are the presumed incantations said by Lady Macbeth in Act 1. However this could also be seen as an upset in the world order, the regicide and subsequent disruption of the divine right of kings. At the time, much of the Jacobean audience would have been religious, meaning they would have seen Lady Macbeth's mental spiral as a sign of punishment sent by the divine. Moreover as a modern audience we recognize this idiom of “blood on one’s hands” as being a reference to guilt but also a conscience. Some may argue that she subconsciously is punishing herself through her sleepwalking. Through this scene Shakspeare is able to convey Lady Macbeth’s disoriented sense as well as her loss of power. In closing Act 5 Scene 1 Lady Macbeth is very different from how she acts in earlier parts of the play appearing to feel copies amounts of guilt rather than believing “a little water will wash this deed”.
In conclusion Lady Macbeth as a character does in fact change and develop throughout the play however I don't believe this is due to her own accord rather the environments she is forced to assimilate into. In the beginning we are shown she doesn't really want or is able to fit the role of a subservient wife of the era rather seeking power. Later on we see how this power that she so wanted has driven her mad. Shakespeare intends to show how a suppressive society can lead to the detriment of those in power.

Could you provide the question?
Original post by SalvationMATT
Could you provide the question?

Oh sorry "Lady Macbeth is a female character who changes during the play, explore how far you agree with this view" the extract given is act 5 scene 1

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending