The Student Room Group

who does journey's end

any predictions? and can someone mark my essay
Reply 1
Hey! I'm revising too. I read that it might be Osborne or the theme of friendship. But I feel like they might give us two characters this year because they did 2 themes last year. Also, I can mark your essay if you want.
Original post by A…A
Hey! I'm revising too. I read that it might be Osborne or the theme of friendship. But I feel like they might give us two characters this year because they did 2 themes last year. Also, I can mark your essay if you want.

omg thank you so much! here it is: (it was on how the relationship between raleigh and stanhope is presented)
The relationship between Raleigh and Stanhope, is a very crucial one, as it highlights how war changes people so much due to the harshness and brutality of it.
In the play ‘Journey's End’, Sherriff uses the character of Raleigh to reveal how Stanhope once was. When Raleigh is first introduced, he is described as a boy who just left school, who is very excited to fight in the war. This positive attitude can be noticed throughout the play, until when he goes out on a raid. For example, when he is given the task to go out on a raid with Osborne, he exclaims 'now frightfully exciting this is!'. Here, this shows Raleigh's enthusiasm and excitement to fight on the frontline. These emotions can be linked to Stanhope too, as he is described early in the play to be ‘no more than a boy', revealing that he too is young. However, a stark contrast between the two characters clearly reveals the devastating effects of war: the corruption of youth. During WWI, there were around 250,000 underage soldiers enlisted, ultimately ruining their childhood as they suffered with shellshock (now known as PTSD) from the harrowing sights they witnessed during fighting. Therefore, Raleigh represents a typical young soldier before war, whilst Stanhope represents a soldier who has realised and experienced the verisimilitude of war as well as suffered the immense trauma.

Sherriff presents the relationship between Stanhope and Raleigh as constantly tense, up until the last scene. Before Stanhope had gone off to war, Raleigh and he were very close, as Raleigh tells Osborne that they always used to ‘meet during the summer’. Therefore, due to this past, intimate relationship between the two, Stanhope is afraid that his current personality and actions (of alcoholism) may be revealed to his family back home, as well as his girlfriend (Raleigh’s sister) whose he still loved- he kept a picture of her ‘in his breast pocket’ which is symbolic as it suggests she is very close to him and his heart both metaphorically and literally (through the photo). As a result of this, Stanhope constantly tries to dismiss any amiable bonding with Raleigh. This can be seen when Stanhope shouts at Raleigh, saying 'Don't Dennis me!’, which causes the audience to feel sympathy for Raleigh, as Stanhope seems as if he is attempting to cut off any relationship with him, and wants to be formal, despite their previous friendship. The tension is heightened when Stanhope exclaims ‘censorship!’ - that he will check Raleigh's letters before they are sent, to ensure nothing unfavourable of him is said.

However, despite all of this, Raleigh still ‘hero-worships’ Stanhope as he used to - his letters were full of praise about Stanhope. The strained relationship is contrasted significantly at the end of the play when Raleigh is dying. Both characters converse using their first names 'Jimmy' and 'Dennis', reminding the audience of their ultimately close relationship.

In conclusion, despite the stressed friendship between Stanhope and Raleigh, when Raleigh first arrives, their close bond is reinforced at the end of the play when Raleigh has been fatally wounded.
for the theme of friendship, other than between Stanhope and Osborne, and Stanhope and Raleigh, are there any other points, and what context would be used (ik pals battalion can be one)
Reply 4
Original post by celebrated-pot
omg thank you so much! here it is: (it was on how the relationship between raleigh and stanhope is presented)
The relationship between Raleigh and Stanhope, is a very crucial one, as it highlights how war changes people so much due to the harshness and brutality of it.
In the play ‘Journey's End’, Sherriff uses the character of Raleigh to reveal how Stanhope once was. When Raleigh is first introduced, he is described as a boy who just left school, who is very excited to fight in the war. This positive attitude can be noticed throughout the play, until when he goes out on a raid. For example, when he is given the task to go out on a raid with Osborne, he exclaims 'now frightfully exciting this is!'. Here, this shows Raleigh's enthusiasm and excitement to fight on the frontline. These emotions can be linked to Stanhope too, as he is described early in the play to be ‘no more than a boy', revealing that he too is young. However, a stark contrast between the two characters clearly reveals the devastating effects of war: the corruption of youth. During WWI, there were around 250,000 underage soldiers enlisted, ultimately ruining their childhood as they suffered with shellshock (now known as PTSD) from the harrowing sights they witnessed during fighting. Therefore, Raleigh represents a typical young soldier before war, whilst Stanhope represents a soldier who has realised and experienced the verisimilitude of war as well as suffered the immense trauma.
Sherriff presents the relationship between Stanhope and Raleigh as constantly tense, up until the last scene. Before Stanhope had gone off to war, Raleigh and he were very close, as Raleigh tells Osborne that they always used to ‘meet during the summer’. Therefore, due to this past, intimate relationship between the two, Stanhope is afraid that his current personality and actions (of alcoholism) may be revealed to his family back home, as well as his girlfriend (Raleigh’s sister) whose he still loved- he kept a picture of her ‘in his breast pocket’ which is symbolic as it suggests she is very close to him and his heart both metaphorically and literally (through the photo). As a result of this, Stanhope constantly tries to dismiss any amiable bonding with Raleigh. This can be seen when Stanhope shouts at Raleigh, saying 'Don't Dennis me!’, which causes the audience to feel sympathy for Raleigh, as Stanhope seems as if he is attempting to cut off any relationship with him, and wants to be formal, despite their previous friendship. The tension is heightened when Stanhope exclaims ‘censorship!’ - that he will check Raleigh's letters before they are sent, to ensure nothing unfavourable of him is said.
However, despite all of this, Raleigh still ‘hero-worships’ Stanhope as he used to - his letters were full of praise about Stanhope. The strained relationship is contrasted significantly at the end of the play when Raleigh is dying. Both characters converse using their first names 'Jimmy' and 'Dennis', reminding the audience of their ultimately close relationship.
In conclusion, despite the stressed friendship between Stanhope and Raleigh, when Raleigh first arrives, their close bond is reinforced at the end of the play when Raleigh has been fatally wounded.


It's a nice essay, but try to cover the events in the correct order... like how the relationship was at the beginning, as the play developed, and at the end. I like how you developed your quotes, but try to situate them more clearly, like this: 'During a conversation in Act 1, Hardy exclaims, “Drinking like a fish as usual.” This could further suggest...' If you want to get top marks, try to embed your context throughout by adding pieces of context rather than a big part at the end. Also, try to write a little bit more for the last paragraph; quantity matters!

I'm so sorry if I was overly critical. I hope you do amazing tomorrow
thank you!! good luck you too

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