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Subjects/qualifications I need to become a lawyer

Hello,

I’m not sure where to put this so I hope this is somewhat the right place I have also uploaded it on Scottish qualification but it doesn’t feel as though it’s the right place

I am soon going into S5, I still have not made my mind up as to what I want to be but I feel I’m really interested in law. I have no experience with any type of jobs, however I am going to a programme where I see what life in university is like for people who are law students. That will be my first ever experience of where I see anything law related.(or even anything related to me seeing anything as to what a certain job is like)
I am aware that you need modern studies to become a lawyer and I’m really worried as I have not done modern studies ever since S2. Could I possibly do criminology in S5 or maybe S6 even though I have never done modern studies? (As if you pick criminology in S5 it has a bit of modern studies with it) One pastoral care teacher in my school said that it will be okay and to just do straight criminology in S6 (where it will be pure criminology) but I don’t think that it’s a good idea as I feel like I’m already behind enough and I don’t want to be behind on a few subjects then add another one on top. I also don’t know what qualifications I need to become a lawyer. I am currently doing
English National 5
Maths National 5
Biology National 5
Geography National 5
Administration & IT National 5
Drama National 5
RMPS National 4 ( as I absolutely hate the class and I do not for a second want to do anything in it, but that doesn’t matter).

I feel like I’m gonna pass all of my National 5 exams of 2024 with a B and maybe higher
(English= A or maybe B,
Maths= hopefully B,
Geography= A,
Drama= A,
Admin & IT= A,
Biology I don’t know as I have not yet had my exam)

Can someone please tell me what subjects I need to pick and if I need National 5, Higher or Advanced Higher of that subject. Especially maths, if I need National 5 or Higher of maths. Also if I absolutely need modern studies and if I do what should I do?
(Oh and I want to be a criminal lawyer, however, I am not set on that.)

I would be extremely grateful for any replies,
Thank you!
Original post by LSK104
Hello,
I’m not sure where to put this so I hope this is somewhat the right place I have also uploaded it on Scottish qualification but it doesn’t feel as though it’s the right place
I am soon going into S5, I still have not made my mind up as to what I want to be but I feel I’m really interested in law. I have no experience with any type of jobs, however I am going to a programme where I see what life in university is like for people who are law students. That will be my first ever experience of where I see anything law related.(or even anything related to me seeing anything as to what a certain job is like)
I am aware that you need modern studies to become a lawyer and I’m really worried as I have not done modern studies ever since S2. Could I possibly do criminology in S5 or maybe S6 even though I have never done modern studies? (As if you pick criminology in S5 it has a bit of modern studies with it) One pastoral care teacher in my school said that it will be okay and to just do straight criminology in S6 (where it will be pure criminology) but I don’t think that it’s a good idea as I feel like I’m already behind enough and I don’t want to be behind on a few subjects then add another one on top. I also don’t know what qualifications I need to become a lawyer. I am currently doing
English National 5
Maths National 5
Biology National 5
Geography National 5
Administration & IT National 5
Drama National 5
RMPS National 4 ( as I absolutely hate the class and I do not for a second want to do anything in it, but that doesn’t matter).
I feel like I’m gonna pass all of my National 5 exams of 2024 with a B and maybe higher
(English= A or maybe B,
Maths= hopefully B,
Geography= A,
Drama= A,
Admin & IT= A,
Biology I don’t know as I have not yet had my exam)
Can someone please tell me what subjects I need to pick and if I need National 5, Higher or Advanced Higher of that subject. Especially maths, if I need National 5 or Higher of maths. Also if I absolutely need modern studies and if I do what should I do?
(Oh and I want to be a criminal lawyer, however, I am not set on that.)
I would be extremely grateful for any replies,
Thank you!

Pretty certain you don't need to have taken specific subjects in your Highers in order to do a law degree. Whilst it's recommended to get an LLB (and not a BA or MA) to get into law, you might not necessarily need it depending on the law firm that you get into.

If you specifically want information on how to get into law specifically for Scots (why?), see the following official job profile for solicitors: https://www.planitplus.net/JobProfiles/View/325/84
Other related job profiles include the following: https://www.planitplus.net/JobProfiles/View/98/84 (I think this is what it meant by criminal lawyer)
The British/English equivalent of the above are:https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/barrister, https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/solicitor

If you then look into the entry requirements for LLB (if you are picky it being at a Scottish university for any reason, check that too), you would quickly notice that you don't need specific subjects to study the law degree. I'm not entirely sure why you think modern studies is necessary to get into law, but there you go.
Original post by mindmax2000
Pretty certain you don't need to have taken specific subjects in your Highers in order to do a law degree. Whilst it's recommended to get an LLB (and not a BA or MA) to get into law, you might not necessarily need it depending on the law firm that you get into.
If you specifically want information on how to get into law specifically for Scots (why?), see the following official job profile for solicitors: https://www.planitplus.net/JobProfiles/View/325/84
Other related job profiles include the following: https://www.planitplus.net/JobProfiles/View/98/84 (I think this is what it meant by criminal lawyer)
The British/English equivalent of the above are:https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/barrister, https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/solicitor
If you then look into the entry requirements for LLB (if you are picky it being at a Scottish university for any reason, check that too), you would quickly notice that you don't need specific subjects to study the law degree. I'm not entirely sure why you think modern studies is necessary to get into law, but there you go.

Your point about LLB vs BA/MA is incorrect. A BA in law is the same as an LLB in law in most cases. For example, Oxford and Cambridge award BAs in law. It is in any event not necessary to have any law degree in order to train as a lawyer.


Please note also that the law of Scotland is not the same as the law of England and Wales or of Northern Ireland. Scots law has more elements of Roman-Dutch law.
(edited 4 weeks ago)
Original post by Stiffy Byng
Your point about LLB vs BA/MA is incorrect. A BA in law is the same as an LLB in law in most cases. For example, Oxford and Cambridge award BAs in law. It is in any event not necessary to have any law degree in order to train as a lawyer.
Please note also that the law of Scotland is not the same as the law of England and Wales or of Northern Ireland. Scots law has more elements of Roman-Dutch law.

Thanks for the correction. Could you provide the sources for your correction so I can back up your points in the future?
Have a look, for example, at the course content of the Oxford BA in Jurisprudence. It contains the same core subjects as an LLB at, for example, Nottingham. Each of those degrees qualifies its holder to train as a lawyer.

The name given to a degree is usually a matter of history. The name has no effect on the status of a degree. For example, a BA in Physics is equivalent to a BSc in Physics.

In medieval universities, every student studied everything taught at the university and then obtained a BA. After a while, the BA became an MA (this is still the case at Oxford, Cambridge, and some other universities). Some would go on to become (non-medical) Doctors, and to this day most doctorates are described as D Phil or Ph D regardless of the subject researched.

More recently founded universities sometimes use different names for degrees. Thus LLB has become the name used for many law degrees. In the US, a law degree is called JD (Juris Doctor).

Other equivalences can be found. For example, a BCL (Bachelor of Civil Law) is equivalent to an LLM (Master of Laws).
(edited 4 weeks ago)

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