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psychology or criminology????

hi, i’ve applied to university for psychology and criminology but i just just denyed for psychology at my top choice of UNI but got given criminology. Is there anyone that has done both or one of them? i’m not sure if ill like criminology
Original post by harietdavyd
hi, i’ve applied to university for psychology and criminology but i just just denyed for psychology at my top choice of UNI but got given criminology. Is there anyone that has done both or one of them? i’m not sure if ill like criminology

Do you have any idea what you want to do after university, in terms of a career?

Although you haven't received a Psychology offer from your preferred uni, do you have Psychology offers from any others?
Criminology would be great if it came with a work placement.
Reply 3
Original post by DataVenia
Do you have any idea what you want to do after university, in terms of a career?
Although you haven't received a Psychology offer from your preferred uni, do you have Psychology offers from any others?


yes i’ve got an offer for psychology at bristol UWE but im not sure if i want to go there
Original post by harietdavyd
yes i’ve got an offer for psychology at bristol UWE but im not sure if i want to go there

Why not?

And what do you want to do with your degree, career-wise?
Reply 5
Original post by DataVenia
Why not?
And what do you want to do with your degree, career-wise?


because i think ill prefer a non- campus uni . and also i do think i want to go into psychology related work after uni. have u studied psychology or criminology ?
Original post by harietdavyd
because i think ill prefer a non- campus uni . and also i do think i want to go into psychology related work after uni. have u studied psychology or criminology ?

Understood.

I've studied neither, but I'm just very aware that if you want to be a practicing Psychologist, then a BPS-accredited degree in Psychology is essential.
Original post by random_matt
Criminology would be great if it came with a work placement.

Whats the work/job?
Original post by harietdavyd
hi, i’ve applied to university for psychology and criminology but i just just denyed for psychology at my top choice of UNI but got given criminology. Is there anyone that has done both or one of them? i’m not sure if ill like criminology

Is it worth a conversation with the uni about what the first year means overall in Psychology and whether you can transfer or major in psychology from year two.

I started with a joint honours in Psychology and Criminology but they were quite different, I ended up with Graduate basis for BPA by gradually eroding criminology, year 3 was all psychology.

So as much as I say you may be able to wangle your way in, a year of criminology you are not interested in is going to be tough.

Criminology is not really a job, Forensic Psychology is but its also very limited and absolutely nothing like most people imagine. I did the MSc and went on to work with offending populations.

Put another way, a clinical psychologist is highly likely to be able to do what a forensic psychologist can, not the other way around.

As others have said, it really boils down to what you want to do after
Original post by wanga_wanga
Whats the work/job?

Potentially working with the police if you are lucky. Although, I maybe thinking of a masters degree.
Original post by wanga_wanga
Is it worth a conversation with the uni about what the first year means overall in Psychology and whether you can transfer or major in psychology from year two.
I started with a joint honours in Psychology and Criminology but they were quite different, I ended up with Graduate basis for BPA by gradually eroding criminology, year 3 was all psychology.
So as much as I say you may be able to wangle your way in, a year of criminology you are not interested in is going to be tough.
Criminology is not really a job, Forensic Psychology is but its also very limited and absolutely nothing like most people imagine. I did the MSc and went on to work with offending populations.
Put another way, a clinical psychologist is highly likely to be able to do what a forensic psychologist can, not the other way around.
As others have said, it really boils down to what you want to do after

As a Clinical Psychologist who has worked with Forensic Psychologists, I would disagree with the idea that the majority or a significant proportion of Clinical Psychologists could simply jump in and do their job. They are significantly different, and a Clinical Psychologist rarely has the experience or training to conduct the more population specific risk assessments or assess offending behaviour. Whilst some clinical psychologists can do this job, it is more about the specific skillset the psychologist has mastered (additional trg etc) rather than simply being able to walk in and do the job with the standard skillset from trg. I of course love Clinical Psychology, but it should never be seen as superior to Forensic, Counselling or even Health Psychology. We are different lenses on similar problems and we often work very differently, and have skillsets that may be uniquely nurtured within each profession.

Greg
Original post by greg tony
As a Clinical Psychologist who has worked with Forensic Psychologists, I would disagree with the idea that the majority or a significant proportion of Clinical Psychologists could simply jump in and do their job. They are significantly different, and a Clinical Psychologist rarely has the experience or training to conduct the more population specific risk assessments or assess offending behaviour. Whilst some clinical psychologists can do this job, it is more about the specific skillset the psychologist has mastered (additional trg etc) rather than simply being able to walk in and do the job with the standard skillset from trg. I of course love Clinical Psychology, but it should never be seen as superior to Forensic, Counselling or even Health Psychology. We are different lenses on similar problems and we often work very differently, and have skillsets that may be uniquely nurtured within each profession.

Greg

@greg tony, do you mind if I ask you a question about your work as Clinical Psychologist and your interaction with Counselling Psychologists?

I often struggle to define a clear difference between the two (other than in the way the doctorates are funded), and end-up talking in vague terms. For example, I might say that Clinical Psychologists are more likely to work in a clinical setting such as the NHS, but that Counselling Psychologists are more likely to work in a private consulting setting. Or that Clinical Psychologists are more likely to be involved in complex mental health issues, but that Counselling Psychologists are more likely to be involved in "everyday" mental health issues.

In your experience, are those vague distinctions even close to being accurate? How would you describe the key differences between the roles?
Original post by greg tony
As a Clinical Psychologist who has worked with Forensic Psychologists, I would disagree with the idea that the majority or a significant proportion of Clinical Psychologists could simply jump in and do their job. They are significantly different, and a Clinical Psychologist rarely has the experience or training to conduct the more population specific risk assessments or assess offending behaviour. Whilst some clinical psychologists can do this job, it is more about the specific skillset the psychologist has mastered (additional trg etc) rather than simply being able to walk in and do the job with the standard skillset from trg. I of course love Clinical Psychology, but it should never be seen as superior to Forensic, Counselling or even Health Psychology. We are different lenses on similar problems and we often work very differently, and have skillsets that may be uniquely nurtured within each profession.
Greg

Hi Greg,

You've misrepresented what I was saying there. "As a insert X" doesn't make something automatically more accurate either by the way. I didn't say anyone could simply "jump in". If you were a clinical psychologist with children neither would you just "jump in" with veterans (depending on what you were doing of course)

You've gone on to say exactly what I said. Forensic Psychology is a narrow scope, although it is not what people, particularly pre university think it is, I said that clinical psychology is broader is career scope.

I am intrigued by your thoughts on counselling psychology and how roles are being split. I'm afraid it is superior to Forensic whether you agree or not. The vast majority of services and their pay scales reflect this more than an opinion not least the doctorate.

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