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please could someone mark my english essay? ( aqa section C )

nevermind - got it marked. 22/25


‘In literature, true love is rarely achieved and never lasts’
Compare how the authors of two texts you have studied present ideas about true love in light of this view.
In Wuthering Heights, and ‘Sonnet 116’, both Emily Bronte and Shakespeare actually counter the view that ‘true love is rarely achieved and never lasts’, both of them putting an emphasis on the soulmate connection in true love, particularly focussing on the idea of no barriers diminishing their love. Contrastingly, the metaphysical poet Richard Lovelace takes a different approach in ‘The Scrutiny’, exploring a so-called romance, that does not endure, and is focused on the flesh rather than the bond of the souls.
Bronte particularly uses Heathcliff and Catherine as the embodiment of an enduring soulmate connection / love, and this is present from the offset of the novel. Our initial introduction to Catherine is through her ghostly form before Brontë’s time shift to Catherine’s teenage years. She calls ‘I’m come home’ after having ‘been awaif for 20 years’. As the novel comes to a close, Bronte even returns to her use of ghostly and fantastical imagery to really emphasise this enduring love, as they are even after death they are supposedly seen as ‘phantoms’ by a little boy, suggesting that their love is so strong that it even lasts into the afterlife. This image of lasting love is greatly emphasised during Catherine’s great confession to Nelly, as although she accepts Edgar’s marriage proposal, she refers to Heathcliff as the ‘eternal rocks beneath’, even proclaiming ‘I am Heathcliff’ and and that ‘he’s more [her]self than’ she is. Bronte even has Heathcliff refer to Catherine directly say he ‘cannot live without [his] soul’ and [his] life’, creating this sense of a bond so strong that it is almost as if they are one being. This could suggest the idea of the love lasting, as it makes them feel a part of each other, no matter the difficulty, or hardships, even if it is death.
Shakespeare also explores the idea of soulmates in ‘Sonnet 116’, insinuating that in a ‘marriage of true mindes’ it never ‘alters when it alteration findes’, something that is only really found between soul mates. This links to the concept of Catherine and Heathcliff’s love continuing after death, as this is possibly the greatest ‘alteration’ that one may find within their life. Heathcliff even continually pursues Catherine during his life as well, not only telling Catherine to ‘haunt’ him before she dies, but taking her locket, dropping out all the contents (such as the blond lock that belongs to Edgar, Catherine’s husband), ‘replacing it with a black lock of his own’. Shakespeare also deems that ‘Lov’s not Times foole’ even when one’s ‘rosie lips and cheeks’ have disappeared, which is greatly portrayed in Wuthering Heights upon Catherine’s death. Heathcliff still declares her his ‘darling’ and his ‘love’, despite mocking weakness of others (such as his own son Linton, comparing him to a ‘puling chicken’), indicating real love as something that lays within the psyche and soul, rather than physical aspects. Shakespeare even ends the poem with the typical concluding rhyming couplet of a Shakespearean sonnet, saying ‘if this error and upon me proved / I never writ, nor no man ever loved’. By having this as the concluding statement, as well as stating it with such faith in his claims, Shakespeare pushes the notion that it is a true fact that true love is unchanging, unlike the claim that true love ‘never lasts’.
Bronte also rejects the belief that ‘true love is rarely achieved’ in addition to it not lasting, exemplifying ‘true love’ twice across Wuthering Heights. Although Heathcliff and 1st-generation Catherine are seemingly the greatest example of true love within the novel, we must not deny the undeniable: the bond between Hareton and 2nd-generation Catherine (Cathy). Bronte portrays their hardships, with Cathy initially saying she ‘despise’ him. Despite her mistreatment towards him, continually mocking his literacy skills as she finds them ‘extremely funny’, scorning him for having ‘selected [her] favourite’ books to learn from, and Hareton’s attempt at ignoring his interest in her, having ‘flung off’ an offered book, and muttering threats such as wanting to ‘snap her neck’, he shortly concedes after receiving a ‘gentle kiss’, leaving ‘all his rudeness’ to desert him. Bronte uses the symbol of a book to show their ability to overcome their hardships, not only indicating the idea of enduring love, but also further reflecting Shakespeare’s beliefs represented in ‘Sonnet 116’. With Cathy ‘wrapping a handsome book’ which Hareton accepts being the initial opening to their sense of unity, and them later being of ‘such radiant countenances bent over the page of the accepted book’, Bronte really affirms the idea that true love is able to overcome troubles, (or ‘tempests’ as Shakespeare refers to them), and even suggest that they can actually strengthen one’s bond when it is true. Bronte uses the two characters to reaffirm the idea that true love is certainly achievable, dispelling the idea that it is rare due to the frequency in the novel.
Contrastingly, Lovelace portrays an opposing stance in ‘The Scrutiny’, using a fickle speaker to drive the narrative of supposed love (or lust) not enduring. He constantly refers to aspects of time, saying ‘it is already morn’ to the addressee, and that the speakers ‘sworn’ promise to be hers is now an ‘impossibility’. This immediately creates a sense of love that does not last. He even refers to his time spent with the addressee as a ‘tedious twelve hours’, using alliteration to emphasise the feeling of time dragging on. This greatly contrasts with Wuthering Heights, as Heathcliff and Catherine do not wish to spend any time apart. We can see this beyond the obvious: Heathcliff telling Nelly to have him ‘carried’ and ‘buried’ next to Catherine, but it is even shown from the very beginning of the novel, as she writes that the ‘worst punishment [they] could invent was to keep [catherine] separate from Heathcliff’. He also creates a lack of duty to one individual person, and makes it seem as though it is a choice, rather than a bond, using the conditional to say ‘if when [he has] loved [his] round’ he finds the addressee the most ‘pleasant’, he shall return to her. This directly contrasts to Shakespeare’s argument in ‘Sonnet 116’ that love is unconditional, something that is greatly portrayed throughout Wuthering Heights, particularly through Heathcliff and Catherine. Lovelace’s poem also contrasts to the innocent love of Hareton and Cathy, as they are ‘soon to be married’ on ‘New Year’s Day’, symbolising unity and devotion, unlike the fickle speaker in ‘The Scrutiny’.

In conclusion, Wuthering Heights and ‘Sonnet 116’ reject the idea that ‘true love is rarely achieved and never lasts’, both portraying it as ‘an ever fixed marke’, with Bronte showing this through Catherine’s omnipresence in Heathcliff’s life even after her death, with him seeing her in everything, ‘even in [his] own features’. ‘The Scrutiny’ provides a stark contrast to the other texts, focusing on the flesh and physical aspects of love, with the speaker even declaring his wish to experience women who are both ‘black and fair’. ‘The Scrutiny’ could even be seen as the antithesis to Shakespeare’s poem, perhaps portraying the example of what true love is not.
(edited 3 weeks ago)
Reply 1
Original post by daisyhw8
thank you!
‘In literature, true love is rarely achieved and never lasts’
Compare how the authors of two texts you have studied present ideas about true love in light of this view.
In Wuthering Heights, and ‘Sonnet 116’, both Emily Bronte and Shakespeare actually counter the view that ‘true love is rarely achieved and never lasts’, both of them putting an emphasis on the soulmate connection in true love, particularly focussing on the idea of no barriers diminishing their love. Contrastingly, the metaphysical poet Richard Lovelace takes a different approach in ‘The Scrutiny’, exploring a so-called romance, that does not endure, and is focused on the flesh rather than the bond of the souls.
Bronte particularly uses Heathcliff and Catherine as the embodiment of an enduring soulmate connection / love, and this is present from the offset of the novel. Our initial introduction to Catherine is through her ghostly form before Brontë’s time shift to Catherine’s teenage years. She calls ‘I’m come home’ after having ‘been awaif for 20 years’. As the novel comes to a close, Bronte even returns to her use of ghostly and fantastical imagery to really emphasise this enduring love, as they are even after death they are supposedly seen as ‘phantoms’ by a little boy, suggesting that their love is so strong that it even lasts into the afterlife. This image of lasting love is greatly emphasised during Catherine’s great confession to Nelly, as although she accepts Edgar’s marriage proposal, she refers to Heathcliff as the ‘eternal rocks beneath’, even proclaiming ‘I am Heathcliff’ and and that ‘he’s more [her]self than’ she is. Bronte even has Heathcliff refer to Catherine directly say he ‘cannot live without [his] soul’ and [his] life’, creating this sense of a bond so strong that it is almost as if they are one being. This could suggest the idea of the love lasting, as it makes them feel a part of each other, no matter the difficulty, or hardships, even if it is death.
Shakespeare also explores the idea of soulmates in ‘Sonnet 116’, insinuating that in a ‘marriage of true mindes’ it never ‘alters when it alteration findes’, something that is only really found between soul mates. This links to the concept of Catherine and Heathcliff’s love continuing after death, as this is possibly the greatest ‘alteration’ that one may find within their life. Heathcliff even continually pursues Catherine during his life as well, not only telling Catherine to ‘haunt’ him before she dies, but taking her locket, dropping out all the contents (such as the blond lock that belongs to Edgar, Catherine’s husband), ‘replacing it with a black lock of his own’. Shakespeare also deems that ‘Lov’s not Times foole’ even when one’s ‘rosie lips and cheeks’ have disappeared, which is greatly portrayed in Wuthering Heights upon Catherine’s death. Heathcliff still declares her his ‘darling’ and his ‘love’, despite mocking weakness of others (such as his own son Linton, comparing him to a ‘puling chicken’), indicating real love as something that lays within the psyche and soul, rather than physical aspects. Shakespeare even ends the poem with the typical concluding rhyming couplet of a Shakespearean sonnet, saying ‘if this error and upon me proved / I never writ, nor no man ever loved’. By having this as the concluding statement, as well as stating it with such faith in his claims, Shakespeare pushes the notion that it is a true fact that true love is unchanging, unlike the claim that true love ‘never lasts’.
Bronte also rejects the belief that ‘true love is rarely achieved’ in addition to it not lasting, exemplifying ‘true love’ twice across Wuthering Heights. Although Heathcliff and 1st-generation Catherine are seemingly the greatest example of true love within the novel, we must not deny the undeniable: the bond between Hareton and 2nd-generation Catherine (Cathy). Bronte portrays their hardships, with Cathy initially saying she ‘despise:undefined: him. Despite her mistreatment towards him, continually mocking his literacy skills as she finds them ‘extremely funny’, scorning him for having ‘selected [her] favourite’ books to learn from, and Hareton’s attempt at ignoring his interest in her, having ‘flung off’ an offered book, and muttering threats such as wanting to ‘snap her neck’, he shortly concedes after receiving a ‘gentle kiss’, leaving ‘all his rudeness’ to desert him. Bronte uses the symbol of a book to show their ability to overcome their hardships, not only indicating the idea of enduring love, but also further reflecting Shakespeare’s beliefs represented in ‘Sonnet 116’. With Cathy ‘wrapping a handsome book’ which Hareton accepts being the initial opening to their sense of unity, and them later being of ‘such radiant countenances bent over the page of the accepted book’, Bronte really affirms the idea that true love is able to overcome troubles, (or ‘tempests’ as Shakespeare refers to them), and even suggest that they can actually strengthen one’s bond when it is true. Bronte uses the two characters to reaffirm the idea that true love is certainly achievable, dispelling the idea that it is rare due to the frequency in the novel.
Contrastingly, Lovelace portrays an opposing stance in ‘The Scrutiny’, using a fickle speaker to drive the narrative of supposed love (or lust) not enduring. He constantly refers to aspects of time, saying ‘it is already morn’ to the addressee, and that the speakers ‘sworn’ promise to be hers is now an ‘impossibility’. This immediately creates a sense of love that does not last. He even refers to his time spent with the addressee as a ‘tedious twelve hours’, using alliteration to emphasise the feeling of time dragging on. This greatly contrasts with Wuthering Heights, as Heathcliff and Catherine do not wish to spend any time apart. We can see this beyond the obvious: Heathcliff telling Nelly to have him ‘carried’ and ‘buried’ next to Catherine, but it is even shown from the very beginning of the novel, as she writes that the ‘worst punishment [they] could invent was to keep [Catherine] separate from Heathcliff’. He also creates a lack of duty to one individual person, and makes it seem as though it is a choice, rather than a bond, using the conditional to say ‘if when [he has] loved [his] round’ he finds the addressee the most ‘pleasant’, he shall return to her. This directly contrasts to Shakespeare’s argument in ‘Sonnet 116’ that love is unconditional, something that is greatly portrayed throughout Wuthering Heights, particularly through Heathcliff and Catherine. Lovelace’s poem also contrasts to the innocent love of Hareton and Cathy, as they are ‘soon to be married’ on ‘New Year’s Day’, symbolising unity and devotion, unlike the fickle speaker in ‘The Scrutiny’.
In conclusion, Wuthering Heights and ‘Sonnet 116’ reject the idea that ‘true love is rarely achieved and never lasts’, both portraying it as ‘an ever fixed marke’, with Bronte showing this through Catherine’s omnipresence in Heathcliff’s life even after her death, with him seeing her in everything, ‘even in [his] own features’. ‘The Scrutiny’ provides a stark contrast to the other texts, focusing on the flesh and physical aspects of love, with the speaker even declaring his wish to experience women who are both ‘black and fair’. ‘The Scrutiny’ could even be seen as the antithesis to Shakespeare’s poem, perhaps portraying the example of what true love is not.

Options:

1.

Send it to your teacher to mark.

2.

Get the mark scheme and mark it yourself (really good for understanding what the exam board is looking for)

3.

Get a parent to mark it (using the mark scheme).

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