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heyy can somone mark my p&c essay for monday please!!

its obv not the best but yeahhh (for aqa btw)

Compare the ways poets present the power of the natural world in “Exposure” and in one other poem from Power and Conflict.

In both Exposure by Wilfred Owen and The Prelude by William Wordsworth, nature is presented as an inescapable force. However, in Exposure, nature is presented as aggressive and acting against mankind whereas in The Prelude nature has power due to its great expanse and beauty. Owen was a soldier who died in battle, he wrote to expose the horrors of war and the terrible conditions the soldiers had to live in. On the other hand, Wordsworth was a romantic poet who celebrated nature's beauty hence why his poem is inspired by the lake district and how he felt as if he could escape to nature for comfort.

Both poets use personification to present the power of nature. Owen juxtaposes traditional views of mother nature as nurturing by describing it as “her melancholy army”. The noun army connotes systematic violence and brutality which aligns nature's power as being torturous and deceitful. Wordsworth describes nature as powerful by suggesting that mankind underestimates the power of nature. He also personifies nature by saying that he was “led by her” which presents nature as a maternal figure as it provides guidance similar to how a mother does. The pronoun “her” shows signs of natures femininity which connotes beauty, peace, and gentleness. The speaker is lulled into a sense of security when being with nature as he views it to be harmless.

Throughout the whole poem, Owen uses personification to emphasise to his readers that nature is the real enemy at war. For example in the opening line, the poet focuses on the “merciless iced east winds that knive us”. This illustrates how the “wind” is impacting the soldiers negatively and is one of the main causes of death at war. The adjective ‘merciless’ portrays how relentless the wind is, emphasising to the reader that nature is determined to harm the soldiers, adding to the threats from the opponents. Furthermore, the phrase ‘knive us’ carries connotations of being stabbed in the back, perhaps portraying how shocked the soldiers were, as they did not expect weather to become an enemy. Owen may characterise nature as cruel and brutal to expose the harsh realities of war and dispel the fake advertisement of the propaganda, warning his readers about the terrible conditions he and other soldiers who fought in WWI had to go through which in turn could evoke sympathy within the reader.

One big difference between both poems is the form and structure. In The Prelude, Wordsworth writes in blank verse meaning there is no rhyme scheme. This denies the reader of any form of pause which presents nature as overwhelming and elicits a sense of breathlessness. Contrastingly, in Exposure, Owen creates an ABBAC rhyme scheme. By making the 5th line stand out it may be seen as striking to the reader and it also provides insight into Owen's own emotions and inner thoughts. This pattern of rhyme scheme is consistent throughout the whole of the poem which could reflect the monotony of the war as “nothing happens”. Throughout his poem, Owen also uses half-rhyme for example in “knife us” and “nervous”. This leaves the reader to be unsatisfied as they were expecting a rhyme. This mirrors how the soldiers are expecting conflict of war but instead, they are faced with the conflict of survival against nature.

In conclusion, both poems present the power of the natural world. However, in Exposure, nature is presented as being inescapable and torturous whereas in The Prelude nature is presented as beautiful and nurturing as it provides guidance.
you could talk about the theme of halves in the poem that run along with the half rhymes and testify to the harshness of life in the trenches, since it says 'like a dull rumour of some other war' (half-real) 'we turn back to our dying' (half alive) 'wearied we keep awake' (half-awake). Symbolises how the war has taken away half of themselves (or something like that idk I just noticed a patten)
Also, for prelude, you have to talk about what the power of nature symbolises, you have to talk about how it changes his view, as a child from 'one track of sparkling light' and 'colours of green fields' to 'a huge peak, black and huge', and 'huge and mighty forms, that do not live like living men', the juxtaposition of colour to darkness- 'sparkling' to 'black' is an allegory for how Worsdworth realises that the power of nature does not just have the propensity for beauty, but for ugliness also- which further symbolises how, from a child to an adult, he realises the evil abundant in nature and the world which the power of nature symbolsies. You can talk about the French revolution or industrialisation for context
Original post by KingsleyArtha1
you could talk about the theme of halves in the poem that run along with the half rhymes and testify to the harshness of life in the trenches, since it says 'like a dull rumour of some other war' (half-real) 'we turn back to our dying' (half alive) 'wearied we keep awake' (half-awake). Symbolises how the war has taken away half of themselves (or something like that idk I just noticed a patten)

yhh good idea!! thanks so much
Reply 4
Original post by doughnutsareslay
its obv not the best but yeahhh (for aqa btw)
Compare the ways poets present the power of the natural world in “Exposure” and in one other poem from Power and Conflict.
In both Exposure by Wilfred Owen and The Prelude by William Wordsworth, nature is presented as an inescapable force. However, in Exposure, nature is presented as aggressive and acting against mankind whereas in The Prelude nature has power due to its great expanse and beauty. Owen was a soldier who died in battle, he wrote to expose the horrors of war and the terrible conditions the soldiers had to live in. On the other hand, Wordsworth was a romantic poet who celebrated nature's beauty hence why his poem is inspired by the lake district and how he felt as if he could escape to nature for comfort.
Both poets use personification to present the power of nature. Owen juxtaposes traditional views of mother nature as nurturing by describing it as “her melancholy army”. The noun army connotes systematic violence and brutality which aligns nature's power as being torturous and deceitful. Wordsworth describes nature as powerful by suggesting that mankind underestimates the power of nature. He also personifies nature by saying that he was “led by her” which presents nature as a maternal figure as it provides guidance similar to how a mother does. The pronoun “her” shows signs of natures femininity which connotes beauty, peace, and gentleness. The speaker is lulled into a sense of security when being with nature as he views it to be harmless.
Throughout the whole poem, Owen uses personification to emphasise to his readers that nature is the real enemy at war. For example in the opening line, the poet focuses on the “merciless iced east winds that knive us”. This illustrates how the “wind” is impacting the soldiers negatively and is one of the main causes of death at war. The adjective ‘merciless’ portrays how relentless the wind is, emphasising to the reader that nature is determined to harm the soldiers, adding to the threats from the opponents. Furthermore, the phrase ‘knive us’ carries connotations of being stabbed in the back, perhaps portraying how shocked the soldiers were, as they did not expect weather to become an enemy. Owen may characterise nature as cruel and brutal to expose the harsh realities of war and dispel the fake advertisement of the propaganda, warning his readers about the terrible conditions he and other soldiers who fought in WWI had to go through which in turn could evoke sympathy within the reader.
One big difference between both poems is the form and structure. In The Prelude, Wordsworth writes in blank verse meaning there is no rhyme scheme. This denies the reader of any form of pause which presents nature as overwhelming and elicits a sense of breathlessness. Contrastingly, in Exposure, Owen creates an ABBAC rhyme scheme. By making the 5th line stand out it may be seen as striking to the reader and it also provides insight into Owen's own emotions and inner thoughts. This pattern of rhyme scheme is consistent throughout the whole of the poem which could reflect the monotony of the war as “nothing happens”. Throughout his poem, Owen also uses half-rhyme for example in “knife us” and “nervous”. This leaves the reader to be unsatisfied as they were expecting a rhyme. This mirrors how the soldiers are expecting conflict of war but instead, they are faced with the conflict of survival against nature.
In conclusion, both poems present the power of the natural world. However, in Exposure, nature is presented as being inescapable and torturous whereas in The Prelude nature is presented as beautiful and nurturing as it provides guidance.

I feel like you could develop your agenda or thesis more as you've only given brief context maybe add further meaning. Also with your quotes I feel like you could further develop or adding opposing arguements and interpretations. dig deeper. My teacher has drilled the phrase visualise and emphasise in my head so maybe attempt to do that. I would give this 24/32

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