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How does Priestley explore the importance of social class in An Inspector Calls?

If somebody could read this paragraph on social class in An Inspector Calls, and give feedback, I would appreciate it :smile:

Throughout the play, Priestley uses the Inspector as a proxy and mouthpiece to get his socialist views of social class and the social hierarchy to the audience. Priestley explores the importance of social class in An Inspector Calls to show that the the Inspector, in his final message, emphasises that “there are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths”, reflecting his socialist views that the working class and upper class are “intertwined” with one another, and that the upper class has a responsibility to the working class in their “millions”. The use of this repetition emphasises the disproportionality between the amount of working class and upper class people, showing the scale at which the working class are being exploited. It also suggests that, although they have ruined the life of Eva Smith, there are many more people like herself for them to right their wrongs. Furthermore, within this last message from the inspector, he says that, “if men will not learn this lesson, they will learn it in fire, blood and anguish”. Priestley says this whilst trying to convince the Birling’s that if they do not learn from their mistakes now, there will be greater consequences and repercussions later on. The use of the rule of 3 of “fire, blood and anguish” suggests that it is a reflection of the wars since they too were full of “blood” and terror. It further reflects the wars since the 1945 audience have already experienced two wars, and if the middle class do not correct their poor attitudes, it would lead to a third, linking to An Inspector Calls being an anti-war play. Priestley using this imagery to describe the punishment of the Birling’s not learning their lesson, directly reflects the tragedy of the two wars, and how they were an economic consequence of the upper class’ capitalist views. It suggests that the upper class are the reason for both world wars, and when they do not learn their lesson from world war one, the working class pay the consequence by having to be on the frontlines yet again. This subtle mention of the war would invoke a strong response to those in the audience as they had just witnessed the horrors of the wars, allowing Priestley to use that to his advantage and push forth his socialist agenda.
Thats an amazing paragraph, is this for gcse english lit?
definitely include more language analysis, try commenting on particular words in 'millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths' and why Priestley chose those words/ the connotations of them
Reply 2
Original post by ayah.ahd
If somebody could read this paragraph on social class in An Inspector Calls, and give feedback, I would appreciate it :smile:
Throughout the play, Priestley uses the Inspector as a proxy and mouthpiece to get his socialist views of social class and the social hierarchy to the audience. Priestley explores the importance of social class in An Inspector Calls to show that the the Inspector, in his final message, emphasises that “there are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths”, reflecting his socialist views that the working class and upper class are “intertwined” with one another, and that the upper class has a responsibility to the working class in their “millions”. The use of this repetition emphasises the disproportionality between the amount of working class and upper class people, showing the scale at which the working class are being exploited. It also suggests that, although they have ruined the life of Eva Smith, there are many more people like herself for them to right their wrongs. Furthermore, within this last message from the inspector, he says that, “if men will not learn this lesson, they will learn it in fire, blood and anguish”. Priestley says this whilst trying to convince the Birling’s that if they do not learn from their mistakes now, there will be greater consequences and repercussions later on. The use of the rule of 3 of “fire, blood and anguish” suggests that it is a reflection of the wars since they too were full of “blood” and terror. It further reflects the wars since the 1945 audience have already experienced two wars, and if the middle class do not correct their poor attitudes, it would lead to a third, linking to An Inspector Calls being an anti-war play. Priestley using this imagery to describe the punishment of the Birling’s not learning their lesson, directly reflects the tragedy of the two wars, and how they were an economic consequence of the upper class’ capitalist views. It suggests that the upper class are the reason for both world wars, and when they do not learn their lesson from world war one, the working class pay the consequence by having to be on the frontlines yet again. This subtle mention of the war would invoke a strong response to those in the audience as they had just witnessed the horrors of the wars, allowing Priestley to use that to his advantage and push forth his socialist agenda.

Very good analysis but you could try linking back to the question more. It's great that you explain the effect of the repetition and rule of 3, but it always helps to link this back to what the effect means in terms of social class
Reply 3
Original post by elsie_rose_
Thats an amazing paragraph, is this for gcse english lit?
definitely include more language analysis, try commenting on particular words in 'millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths' and why Priestley chose those words/ the connotations of them

yep im preparing for the exam on monday
Original post by ayah.ahd
yep im preparing for the exam on monday

did you write it based on Mr Salles' video ?
its very good, consider also an alternative interpretation
would you mind if i PM you?
Reply 5
Original post by niqabiforever21
did you write it based on Mr Salles' video ?
its very good, consider also an alternative interpretation
would you mind if i PM you?
yepp i didd, also yeah you can pm me

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