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OCR Law or AQA Sociology A Level or Aqa Economics

Anyone do any of these or edexcel business which taking for sure and idk about edexcel politics too and for aqa psych has lots of structures to learn I think ocr law is better and easie
Original post by Brianstudy01
Anyone do any of these or edexcel business which taking for sure and idk about edexcel politics too and for aqa psych has lots of structures to learn I think ocr law is better and easie

What degree or career do you specifically want? From what you have listed, none of your subjects are required subjects and it sounds like you want to apply for degrees that don't require any specific subjects (psychology is borderline since some unis ask for it, but generally you can do a psychology degree with any subject)
If so, it almost doesn't matter which subjects you pick so long you have high grades and that you like them.
I would still avoid Law though (disclaimer: I haven't done it), because a lot of people who did it say the A Level is badly designed and you might have a lot of difficulty getting high grade (it's also not required to get into a law degree).

Personal preference: economics, politics, and psychology because they are considered the more academic subjects whilst giving you a well rounded profile for degrees that ask for a range of different subjects. Economics is said to go with politics well.
Sociology is considered "easy" by some universities, and business is considered very similar to economics (I can vouch that they're substantially different) whilst being less academic. Law is also considered not very academic since the subject is focused more on practical application by some unis.
Sociology and Psychology tend to go well together though.

Note: you won't be able to do most degrees in economics without A Level Maths (Economics at A Level is not a required subject for any economics degree).

If you can be more specific about what you are looking for, then I might be able to give better insights.
Original post by MindMax2000
What degree or career do you specifically want? From what you have listed, none of your subjects are required subjects and it sounds like you want to apply for degrees that don't require any specific subjects (psychology is borderline since some unis ask for it, but generally you can do a psychology degree with any subject)
If so, it almost doesn't matter which subjects you pick so long you have high grades and that you like them.
I would still avoid Law though (disclaimer: I haven't done it), because a lot of people who did it say the A Level is badly designed and you might have a lot of difficulty getting high grade (it's also not required to get into a law degree).
Personal preference: economics, politics, and psychology because they are considered the more academic subjects whilst giving you a well rounded profile for degrees that ask for a range of different subjects. Economics is said to go with politics well.
Sociology is considered "easy" by some universities, and business is considered very similar to economics (I can vouch that they're substantially different) whilst being less academic. Law is also considered not very academic since the subject is focused more on practical application by some unis.
Sociology and Psychology tend to go well together though.
Note: you won't be able to do most degrees in economics without A Level Maths (Economics at A Level is not a required subject for any economics degree).
If you can be more specific about what you are looking for, then I might be able to give better insights.

Like pharmacy or get in the tech space and save up for real estate
Original post by Brianstudy01
Like pharmacy or get in the tech space and save up for real estate

That's absolutely confusing:

If you want to do pharmacy, have you already chosen biology and chemistry (with chemistry being the more important subject)? If not, it's almost impossible to get in with the subjects that you have listed. Why would you think you can get into pharmacy with subjects in social sciences?

Whilst you don't need a degree in computer science to get into tech, the typical A Levels for computer science would be maths. Physics or computer science would come in close second. You have listed none of these subjects. Again, why would you think you can get into tech with subjects in social science?

Whilst you don't need anything to get into real estate, if you want to do a degree to become a surveyor you typically need to do a RICS accredited degree, most (if not all) won't require particularly high grades or specific subjects at undergrad level.

If you meant you want to go into property investment, you don't need any qualifications to do it. I would typically look into something else other than an academic degree. In fact, saving up to go into real estate is kind of slow.

I'm surprised that you mentioned pharmacy. Unless you are really in it for the job and subject, you would struggle to get through it. It can be a very stressful role.

Original post by MindMax2000
That's absolutely confusing:

If you want to do pharmacy, have you already chosen biology and chemistry (with chemistry being the more important subject)? If not, it's almost impossible to get in with the subjects that you have listed. Why would you think you can get into pharmacy with subjects in social sciences?

Whilst you don't need a degree in computer science to get into tech, the typical A Levels for computer science would be maths. Physics or computer science would come in close second. You have listed none of these subjects. Again, why would you think you can get into tech with subjects in social science?

Whilst you don't need anything to get into real estate, if you want to do a degree to become a surveyor you typically need to do a RICS accredited degree, most (if not all) won't require particularly high grades or specific subjects at undergrad level.

If you meant you want to go into property investment, you don't need any qualifications to do it. I would typically look into something else other than an academic degree. In fact, saving up to go into real estate is kind of slow.

I'm surprised that you mentioned pharmacy. Unless you are really in it for the job and subject, you would struggle to get through it. It can be a very stressful role.


How do you not recommend pharmacy lmk I might get in tech than?
Original post by Brianstudy01
How do you not recommend pharmacy lmk I might get in tech than?

Well I am not saying you not to go into pharmacy, but it is an intensive job. You are after all dealing with medicine, and there are a lot of risks involved. If you're doing it purely for the money, then it's probably the wrong reason to go into it.

It's a very similar story for tech, but with significantly less at stake. It's a very intensive job with a lot of headaches. If you are going into it purely for the money, then it's probably the wrong reason.

Do note: I don't work in either fields, so you should really get a second opinion. However, I would very much doubt the second opinion wouldn't echo any of my points above.
Original post by MindMax2000
Well I am not saying you not to go into pharmacy, but it is an intensive job. You are after all dealing with medicine, and there are a lot of risks involved. If you're doing it purely for the money, then it's probably the wrong reason to go into it.
It's a very similar story for tech, but with significantly less at stake. It's a very intensive job with a lot of headaches. If you are going into it purely for the money, then it's probably the wrong reason.
Do note: I don't work in either fields, so you should really get a second opinion. However, I would very much doubt the second opinion wouldn't echo any of my points above.

How are there risks involved in pharmacy
Original post by Brianstudy01
How are there risks involved in pharmacy

Well if you give the wrong drugs to the patient and the patient dies, you have a lot to answer for (and losing your license would be the least of it). It's then not about just one patient, but many who come into your pharmacy.

The more senior you become, the more responsibilities you have. There is usually 101 things that you need to worry about and sort out.

There is a strong demand for pharmacists though since there is a shortage of them, even if the hiring managers in the NHS make you jump through a lot of hoops to get the job. However, if you're in it purely for the money, it's the wrong job to go for.

I recommend you speak to someone who is a pharmacist to get the full picture.

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