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Uni

Hi guys,
I am in Y12 and currently looking at what uni courses I could do.
I like humans geography and some parts of graphic design and am a very practical person (theory is not my thing)
The problem is, the I don’t like the modules for most courses offered.
I also have recently been looking at courses which (such as film) which I have never taken before
I really want a job were I could possibly travel.
If anyone has any suggestions of jobs or uni courses that would be really helpful.
Original post by twenty18
Hi guys,
I am in Y12 and currently looking at what uni courses I could do.
I like humans geography and some parts of graphic design and am a very practical person (theory is not my thing)
The problem is, the I don’t like the modules for most courses offered.
I also have recently been looking at courses which (such as film) which I have never taken before
I really want a job were I could possibly travel.
If anyone has any suggestions of jobs or uni courses that would be really helpful.

I like humans geography and some parts of graphic design and am a very practical person (theory is not my thing)
There is unfortunately not a degree that covers both human geography and graphics design. Cartographer comes to mind, but it generally doesn't require a degree. See: https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/cartographer

The other thing though is that most degrees would involve theory (they can even make the most practical of all subjects sound theoretical). Unis generally aren't known for teaching practical skills.
If you generally want practical skills, you typically go and do an apprenticeship or professional qualifications i.e. most things outside of academia.

The problem is, the I don’t like the modules for most courses offered.
If you don't like theory, I am not surprised.

I really want a job were I could possibly travel.
A degree doesn't guarantee you would travel. Your job does though.
Strictly speaking, if you want to travel, you can do so without any qualifications.

There are jobs that would allow you to travel, but if you travel for work it can become a pain more than anything (people can lose interest in travelling due to this). The hours are also typically very long and you end up having to compromise a lot on personal life (not really ideal if you want a family). The typical jobs that come to mind include:

Most things in the tourism sector e.g. catering, cruise lines, touring companies

Teaching English as Foreign Language

Remote work - which can be virtually anything that doesn't require you to be in a fixed location

Consulting - a lot of leg cramps if by plane

Armed Forces - usually not to enjoy the scenery though

Videographer and photographer

Something related to geography - e.g. urban planning, environmental science (field work), cartography

Archaeology

Volcanology

Real estate - to an extent, and it depends on the individual location of the site. This includes architecture and civil and structural engineering.

Lecturer in specialist subjects

Working in international offices and needing to traverse between them - see Friends episodes where Chandler has to go to offices in Tuscan

Travel writing or vlogging (not likely to be paid a lot and difficult to get work)

Reply 2
This is really helpful, thank you so much! I really like the idea of teaching English as a foreign language.
Original post by twenty18
This is really helpful, thank you so much! I really like the idea of teaching English as a foreign language.

Then consider doing either CELTA or Trinity College London CertTESOL. See:
https://www.cambridgeenglish.org/teaching-english/teaching-qualifications/celta/
https://www.trinitycollege.com/qualifications/teaching-english/certtesol

These are widely highly regarded certificates in teaching British English as a second/foreign language. Entry requirements are 2 passes at A Level. There is the DELTA and Diploma TESOL which should be equivalent of bachelor's degree level.

Whilst I don't know of any UK degree that allows you to teach English as a foreign language, there are plenty in the US. This is primarily because you are required to get a master's degree in TESOL in order to teach US English as a foreign language, so expect it as a requirement if you do teach it in Canada and the US.

Do note, if you do take any of the above qualifications, do note that it can work against you for any funding for equivalent degrees i.e. ELQ policy at most universities. If you do take the above qualifications, I recommend doing them after you completed your bachelor's degree. You will be funding them out of pocket (CELTA and CertTESOL cost about £1500 offline and £1000 online if you shop around), but it's a lot more viable than funding a degree that costs £9000 (and very likely more if it's no student finance is involved) per year by yourself.

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