The Student Room Group

Ucat help

Hello, I’m starting to look and try familiarise myself with the ucat but I’m completely clueless when looking at the questions. How would you recommend me to familiarise myself with it and try understand the questions? Can you please give your best tips and best websites and how would you recommend anyone to balance a levels and ucat? Thank you for anyone reading it.
Hi! Don't worry, it can be daunting at first. I found my UCAT progress was pretty slow, but then really rapidly improved within the last couple of weeks. That being said, if you're in year 12 now, make sure you book your UCAT as soon as it opens in June to get the test centre you want and the day. It's probably best to go for early September so you have summer to practise and no school work yet. But don't be afraid of moving it back if you need to, those extra 2 weeks can make all the difference.

In terms of preparation, start by watching a few YouTube Tutorials, make notes of the tips and tricks particularly for the Quantitative Reasong (calculator hacks, fraction and decimal hacks etc.) and for Abstract Reasoning (all the different kinds of patterns that you look for). While at school now, just try and do a bit every day and get in the habit or skim-reading everything eg magazines, books. This will really help your Verbal Reasoning.

Also, I know it costs money, but Medify is brilliant for UCAT. They've got HUNDREDS of questions and mocks and quite good guides and videos to understanding as well. They do £15 a week, £30 a month or £180 for a year, you can extend it as well. From my experience, I think it's better than UCAT Ninja. Just make sure you start doing everything in the timings! That is the biggest difficulty with UCAT. Save the official UCAT mocks for right near your test, they are really important do.

Wish you all the best!
Reply 2
Original post by melirose299
Hello, I’m starting to look and try familiarise myself with the ucat but I’m completely clueless when looking at the questions. How would you recommend me to familiarise myself with it and try understand the questions? Can you please give your best tips and best websites and how would you recommend anyone to balance a levels and ucat? Thank you for anyone reading it.

I personally got a Medify subscription which really helped me. They have a good selection of practice questions and mock paper based on individual sections and ones that mimic the real thing. In addition to this I used YouTube videos to pick up on specific strategies and techniques for the sections I struggled with. Good luck, you will do great!
Reply 3
Original post by reducto7082
Hi! Don't worry, it can be daunting at first. I found my UCAT progress was pretty slow, but then really rapidly improved within the last couple of weeks. That being said, if you're in year 12 now, make sure you book your UCAT as soon as it opens in June to get the test centre you want and the day. It's probably best to go for early September so you have summer to practise and no school work yet. But don't be afraid of moving it back if you need to, those extra 2 weeks can make all the difference.
In terms of preparation, start by watching a few YouTube Tutorials, make notes of the tips and tricks particularly for the Quantitative Reasong (calculator hacks, fraction and decimal hacks etc.) and for Abstract Reasoning (all the different kinds of patterns that you look for). While at school now, just try and do a bit every day and get in the habit or skim-reading everything eg magazines, books. This will really help your Verbal Reasoning.
Also, I know it costs money, but Medify is brilliant for UCAT. They've got HUNDREDS of questions and mocks and quite good guides and videos to understanding as well. They do £15 a week, £30 a month or £180 for a year, you can extend it as well. From my experience, I think it's better than UCAT Ninja. Just make sure you start doing everything in the timings! That is the biggest difficulty with UCAT. Save the official UCAT mocks for right near your test, they are really important do.
Wish you all the best!

Thank you so much I appreciate the advice.
Reply 4
Original post by Sahi_
I personally got a Medify subscription which really helped me. They have a good selection of practice questions and mock paper based on individual sections and ones that mimic the real thing. In addition to this I used YouTube videos to pick up on specific strategies and techniques for the sections I struggled with. Good luck, you will do great!
Thank you so much I appreciate the advice.
Reply 5
Original post by melirose299
Hello, I’m starting to look and try familiarise myself with the ucat but I’m completely clueless when looking at the questions. How would you recommend me to familiarise myself with it and try understand the questions? Can you please give your best tips and best websites and how would you recommend anyone to balance a levels and ucat? Thank you for anyone reading it.

I took ucat last summer and got 2830, so I can give some advice.
Do not try and balance a levels with ucat. finish your a level exams, relax, then you can start to prepare for ucat.
Usually 4-6 weeks is enough. I would personally book your test for end of August so you have 1month+ to prepare, but that's up to you.

I definitely recommend medify. if you are planning on spending money on books, don't. the ucat is an computer based test, so the best thing you can do it practice on a computer. Take a mock first just to see your strengths and weaknesses.

ALSO if you have a friend who is also taking the ucat, one of you should get a medentry subscription. you definitely don't need both medify and medentry, but having someone else's medentry account will give you a wider access to practice questions. (medentry and medify are very similar sites, I personally used medify, but I borrowed my friend's medentry account at times to get a wider variety of questions)

Here is some advice for each section:

verbal reasoning: familiarise yourself with the types of text types. Don't be afraid to just guess the most logical answers here, because reading entire texts can be very time consuming.

decision making: take your time with this section. you get the most time per question out of all sections (about 1min per question).

quantitative reasoning: learn the calculator. the actual maths content is not hard, the hard part is working out problems efficiently. the calculator shortcuts will save you so much time. beware that tables and charts contain irrelevant information designed to waste your time. learn how to pick out important information quickly and make quick calculations. you might be used to showing your working for maths. don't do that, try and do the working out in your head when u can.

abstract reasoning: make a booklet of all the patterns you come across. You don't have much time for this section (15 seconds per question). often, your brain will subconsciously see patterns even if you can't deduce the exact reasoning, so go with your gut if you get stuck.

situational judgement: Read the gmc guidelines for medical ethics. use your common sense here, and try to put yourself in the shoes of the characters in the situations and make logical decisions.

Goodluck with both your A-levels and ucat!!! you got this!
Reply 6
Original post by 1jpark
I took ucat last summer and got 2830, so I can give some advice.
Do not try and balance a levels with ucat. finish your a level exams, relax, then you can start to prepare for ucat.
Usually 4-6 weeks is enough. I would personally book your test for end of August so you have 1month+ to prepare, but that's up to you.
I definitely recommend medify. if you are planning on spending money on books, don't. the ucat is an computer based test, so the best thing you can do it practice on a computer. Take a mock first just to see your strengths and weaknesses.
ALSO if you have a friend who is also taking the ucat, one of you should get a medentry subscription. you definitely don't need both medify and medentry, but having someone else's medentry account will give you a wider access to practice questions. (medentry and medify are very similar sites, I personally used medify, but I borrowed my friend's medentry account at times to get a wider variety of questions)
Here is some advice for each section:

verbal reasoning: familiarise yourself with the types of text types. Don't be afraid to just guess the most logical answers here, because reading entire texts can be very time consuming.

decision making: take your time with this section. you get the most time per question out of all sections (about 1min per question).

quantitative reasoning: learn the calculator. the actual maths content is not hard, the hard part is working out problems efficiently. the calculator shortcuts will save you so much time. beware that tables and charts contain irrelevant information designed to waste your time. learn how to pick out important information quickly and make quick calculations. you might be used to showing your working for maths. don't do that, try and do the working out in your head when u can.

abstract reasoning: make a booklet of all the patterns you come across. You don't have much time for this section (15 seconds per question). often, your brain will subconsciously see patterns even if you can't deduce the exact reasoning, so go with your gut if you get stuck.

situational judgement: Read the gmc guidelines for medical ethics. use your common sense here, and try to put yourself in the shoes of the characters in the situations and make logical decisions.

Goodluck with both your A-levels and ucat!!! you got this!

Thank you so much I appreciate the advice and also wow incredible score congrats.

Quick Reply

Latest