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Maths-based EPQ

Has anyone got any ideas on what I could do as an EPQ to help in pursuing a mathematics degree at Cambridge/Oxford as both universities look for an interest in your chosen subject, and they look at EPQs to see if you show this. Thanks
What other subjects are you doing r n, if I may ask? Perhaps an EPQ that combines maths with one of your other subjects might be a good idea [??]. If you are able to share this info, I am happy to suggest some interesting topics c potentially lots of info accessible.
Reply 2
Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon
What other subjects are you doing r n, if I may ask? Perhaps an EPQ that combines maths with one of your other subjects might be a good idea [??]. If you are able to share this info, I am happy to suggest some interesting topics c potentially lots of info accessible.


Going into year 12 next year and doing maths further maths biology and chemistry. Any ideas would be welcome :smile:
You could maybe do an investigation/essay on the debate about whether maths was discovered or invented :smile:
Original post by Rory L
Has anyone got any ideas on what I could do as an EPQ to help in pursuing a mathematics degree at Cambridge/Oxford as both universities look for an interest in your chosen subject, and they look at EPQs to see if you show this. Thanks

Just thought I should let you know that an EPQ is likely going to be a lot of work for how much benefit it confers. That's not to say it's not worth it if you have a really strong desire to do one for other reasons, but there are many other ways to show interest, namely just doing Maths in your free time, e.g. STEP papers, Olympiads and so on, which will also help with other parts of your application.
Original post by Rory L
Going into year 12 next year and doing maths further maths biology and chemistry. Any ideas would be welcome :smile:
ONE POSSIBLE TOPIC:
"Are several features of biology simply an extension of the fundamental principles of maths and [bio]chemistry?"

[you could discuss how blood flow through blood vessels can be extrapolated from Pouisuille's equation for a pipe; how blood levels of glucose, amino acids, sodium, potassium ions, etc. follow the basic rules of maths; how the mechanics of movement of bones about a joint can be predicted from the maths of moments and forces; etc. and the other side of the coin in that biology is not an exact science, so these predictions need to be flexible and subject to many other factors].

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