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aqa a level psychology review plan?

hi, could someone please review the ao1 part in response to this question: 'Describe and evaluate the psychodynamic approach to explaining human behaviour (16 marks)'

I've tried to constrict the knowledge to waht i think is relevant considering u really only have 6/7 minutes to write it, so i was wondering if it's enough or if i should add/cut bits out. This is mainly copy and pasted from my notes so in the actual exam id i.e. shorten the descriptions for the tripartite personality bit

Main assumptions: :
The main assumption of the psychodynamic approach is that all behavior can be explained in terms of the inner conflicts of the mind.
Freud highlights the role of the unconscious mind, the structure of personality and the influence that childhood experiences have on later life.
Freud believed that the unconscious mind determines most of our behavior and that we are motivated by unconscious emotional drives.

Role of unconscious:
Unscious part of the psyche (mind)
According to psychic determinism, behaviours shaped by unresolved unconscious conflicts among different parts of our personality, as well as by experiences within the psychosexual stages Freud identified
Problems occurring during these stages can result in faxtion, where an individual remains stuck in a prtciualr stage, expressing certain negative personality traits
o For example: if forceful feeding or early weening occurs during the oral stage (0-1 year) then fixation could result in engagement of oral activities (e.g. smoking) and immaturity.
Unconscious protects the conscious mind from potentially harmful thoughts such as traumatic memories. By protecting conscious mind through use of defence mechanisms, reduces anxiety
Contains the drives that also motivate behaviour


The Tripartite Personality- According to Freud, the adult personality is composed of three parts (tripartite):
Id: The Id is present at birth, and the psyche of a newborn consists solely of the id. The id is the biological part (instincts and drives) of the personality plus acts as the selfish aspect of the mind, purely focused on satisfying personal needs and desires. It operates on the pleasure principle, seeking immediate gratification for its wants/needs. The id remains a part of the unconscious mind throughout life, continuously pursing pleasure.
Ego: develops from 1 - 3 years. The ego begins to form as the primarily conscious compoenent of personality, known as the reality principle. The ego uses rational thinking to media the conflicts between the ID and the superego through the use of defense mechanisms. This development marks a critical step in an individual’s ability to interact with the world in a more balanced and realistic manner.
Superego: This is the third primarily unconscious compoenent of the personality, developed from 3 - 5 years. It is governed by the ‘morality principle’, and emerges as the child internalises the values and norms of their parents and society. It influences behaviour by inducing guilt when an individual’s actions conflict with its strict standards, moderating behaviour according to moral and societal expectations

To be mentally healthy the ego has to be able to balance the demands of the id and the superego. If the superego is dominant, the individual might develop a neurosis e.g. depression. If the ID is dominant, the individual might develop a psychosis e.g. schizophrenia.
Original post by unxmutual
hi, could someone please review the ao1 part in response to this question: 'Describe and evaluate the psychodynamic approach to explaining human behaviour (16 marks)'
I've tried to constrict the knowledge to waht i think is relevant considering u really only have 6/7 minutes to write it, so i was wondering if it's enough or if i should add/cut bits out. This is mainly copy and pasted from my notes so in the actual exam id i.e. shorten the descriptions for the tripartite personality bit
Main assumptions: :
The main assumption of the psychodynamic approach is that all behavior can be explained in terms of the inner conflicts of the mind.
Freud highlights the role of the unconscious mind, the structure of personality and the influence that childhood experiences have on later life.
Freud believed that the unconscious mind determines most of our behavior and that we are motivated by unconscious emotional drives.
Role of unconscious:
Unscious part of the psyche (mind)
According to psychic determinism, behaviours shaped by unresolved unconscious conflicts among different parts of our personality, as well as by experiences within the psychosexual stages Freud identified
Problems occurring during these stages can result in faxtion, where an individual remains stuck in a prtciualr stage, expressing certain negative personality traits
o For example: if forceful feeding or early weening occurs during the oral stage (0-1 year) then fixation could result in engagement of oral activities (e.g. smoking) and immaturity.
Unconscious protects the conscious mind from potentially harmful thoughts such as traumatic memories. By protecting conscious mind through use of defence mechanisms, reduces anxiety
Contains the drives that also motivate behaviour
The Tripartite Personality- According to Freud, the adult personality is composed of three parts (tripartite):
Id: The Id is present at birth, and the psyche of a newborn consists solely of the id. The id is the biological part (instincts and drives) of the personality plus acts as the selfish aspect of the mind, purely focused on satisfying personal needs and desires. It operates on the pleasure principle, seeking immediate gratification for its wants/needs. The id remains a part of the unconscious mind throughout life, continuously pursing pleasure.
Ego: develops from 1 - 3 years. The ego begins to form as the primarily conscious compoenent of personality, known as the reality principle. The ego uses rational thinking to media the conflicts between the ID and the superego through the use of defense mechanisms. This development marks a critical step in an individual’s ability to interact with the world in a more balanced and realistic manner.
Superego: This is the third primarily unconscious compoenent of the personality, developed from 3 - 5 years. It is governed by the ‘morality principle’, and emerges as the child internalises the values and norms of their parents and society. It influences behaviour by inducing guilt when an individual’s actions conflict with its strict standards, moderating behaviour according to moral and societal expectations
To be mentally healthy the ego has to be able to balance the demands of the id and the superego. If the superego is dominant, the individual might develop a neurosis e.g. depression. If the ID is dominant, the individual might develop a psychosis e.g. schizophrenia.

That's more than enough for an A01!
Reply 2
Original post by lanadeltay
That's more than enough for an A01!


okay thank u sm !
Original post by unxmutual
okay thank u sm !

to save time for A03 tho I would cut some parts out

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