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Electrical Eng at Bristol or Mechanical Eng at Sheffield

I'm stuck between those 2 options. Can someone guide me into which is better? Maybe career wise? Opportunities? City?
Only you know which subject interests you the most - focus on that decision, and not 'which Uni'.
Look at the optional units in all years of each course, and think about which you would actually choose if you picked that course. Are there any opportunities for a work placement on either course - this adds enormously to your graduate CV.
Original post by brob9090
I'm stuck between those 2 options. Can someone guide me into which is better? Maybe career wise? Opportunities? City?

They're both engineering so will share some similarities in teaching and exam style and application (e.g. industrial focused, real world constraints), but the material will be quite different. Mechanical is focused on forces, loads, heats, pressures, etc. - physical things. Electrical is focused on, well, electricity, magnetism, etc. What would you rather study?
Original post by brob9090
I'm stuck between those 2 options. Can someone guide me into which is better? Maybe career wise? Opportunities? City?

Depends what type of physics is more appealing to you.
Reply 4
Original post by McGinger
Only you know which subject interests you the most - focus on that decision, and not 'which Uni'.
Look at the optional units in all years of each course, and think about which you would actually choose if you picked that course. Are there any opportunities for a work placement on either course - this adds enormously to your graduate CV.

Thanks for that info, I was wondering how come Electrical eng have lower entry reqs than Mech eng. Why is this the case in most unis?? Less Competitive? Less Valued??
Original post by brob9090
Thanks for that info, I was wondering how come Electrical eng have lower entry reqs than Mech eng. Why is this the case in most unis?? Less Competitive? Less Valued??
Probably just popularity, id say that the peak complexities & academic challenges between mechanical & electrical engineering are probably very similar but mechanical engineering on average (looking at all the different subjects) is slightly less complex & challenging. Simultaneously there is probably a better ratio of graduates to jobs in electrical engineering then mechanical engineering.

So the difference in entry requirements is probably more to do with a bigger applicant pool in mechanical engineering and therefore slightly higher requirements. Probably not that surprising as mechanical systems are (imo) more interesting then electronic & electrical systems (and I suspect on a population distribution level of interest most people would lean more mechanical).

However you will probably be best off pursuing what interests you!
(edited 3 weeks ago)
Original post by brob9090
Thanks for that info, I was wondering how come Electrical eng have lower entry reqs than Mech eng. Why is this the case in most unis?? Less Competitive? Less Valued??

Simply because fewer people apply for EE than Mech, across all Universities - it has nothing to do with the 'value' of the subject.

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