The Student Room Group

incident happened yesterday at work- vets

Hello,
I would like someone's opinion on something that happened the other day at work.
So I work at a referral vets as a veterinary theatre assistant, I had a case for a TPLO and we'd opened up the majority of the kit 30 minutes beforehand to make it quicker.
The patient was brought into theatre onto the table, and the surgeon then asked me to get the nanoscope which I got but took me a while to get it plugged in since it wouldn't stay in the port.

Once I got the Nanoscope sorted, I was going to start prepping the leg with chlorapreps but then saw the other surgeon was draping the leg, which I didn't realise till I walked all the around the room to the leg and saw him doing that since he didn't say he was draping.

I then said to the surgeon the leg hasn't been prepped, so the drapes already on the leg was taken off and I had to open up another drape pack so they could use those drapes for the leg and then the leg was then prepped with chloraprep.

do you think that was my fault? Maybe I should have prepped the leg immediately instead of getting the nanoscope, but I was doing what I was told and getting it.
Normally the surgeons announce that the are beginning to drape the incision site, but the surgeon didn't know till I came on the other side of the room.

I only ask this as I felt really bad about it and worried I would get told off for it.
(edited 2 months ago)
Imo this doesn’t seem like a big deal at all. I don’t think it awfully matters what you did first, especially if you were asked to. It was just a simple miscommunication, nothing bad happened, it’s not that big of a deal you had to get a second pack of drapes out.
Reply 2
As a vet, I would be glad you said something vs letting me continue with surgery not realising the patient had not been correctly prepped and risking surgical complications. Also, the surgeon could have asked if the animal had been prepped or if they could start draping. It's no ones fault its just communication as RambleAmple said and I wouldn't be losing any sleep over it as the mistake of draping a patient who had not been prepped was corrected.
Reply 3
So I work at a veterinary practice as a veterinary assistant, and on Tuesday I was asked to deep clean a room at work as there was a patient that had bruella, so I got gowned up with mask and gloves etc, cleaning the whole room firstly with detergent and then 30 minutes later with disinfectant.

I then once everything was wiped, I then released a bomb in the room (airgene aersoal disinfectant).

There was a small stitch up kit in the room as well, normally if there's a kit in an infectious case we soak them in this blue disinfectant which I didn't have with me as I didn't know there was a kit until I went in and the stuff was in theatre.

I made sure to wiped the instruments in the kit and was still in the room once it was bombed, I was thinking about taking it to be soaked but then I thought then it might not be ideal as then I'm risking touching areas/ handles etc and getting them infected.

So yesterday when I came into work, Jen one of the sterling technicians closed of sterilising as a bruella risk as someone, I'm assuming one of the students left the stitch up kit on the side just with a note saying bruella.
So then Jen decided to deep clean sterilising as a precaution.

I kind of feel like it was sort of my fault in a way that she had to close and deep clean sterilising, since I deep cleaned that room and left the kit in there.

I told her that and she said that I did all I was supposed to do. And she also mentioned that my boss said to Jen that she was overacting a bit wanting to deep clean sterilising.

I mean I don't know... I feel like I did everything I could. I don't feel like I could have taken it to sterilising with out infecting something... or maybe I could've I don't know.
Basically, do you think this situation sounded like my fault?
(edited 1 month ago)
jenifer
Reply 5
So I work at a veterinary practice as a veterinary assistant, and on Tuesday I was asked to deep clean a room at work as there was a patient that had bruella, so I got gowned up with mask and gloves etc, cleaning the whole room firstly with detergent and then 30 minutes later with disinfectant.

I then once everything was wiped, I then released a bomb in the room (airgene aersoal disinfectant).

There was a small stitch up kit in the room as well, normally if there's a kit in an infectious case we soak them in this blue disinfectant which I didn't have with me as I didn't know there was a kit until I went in and the stuff was in theatre.

I made sure to wiped the instruments in the kit and was still in the room once it was bombed, I was thinking about taking it to be soaked but then I thought then it might not be ideal as then I'm risking touching areas/ handles etc and getting them infected.

So yesterday when I came into work, Jen one of the sterling technicians closed of sterilising as a bruella risk as someone, I'm assuming one of the students left the stitch up kit on the side just with a note saying bruella.
So then Jen decided to deep clean sterilising as a precaution.

I kind of feel like it was sort of my fault in a way that she had to close and deep clean sterilising, since I deep cleaned that room and left the kit in there.

I told her that and she said that I did all I was supposed to do. And she also mentioned that my boss said to Jen that she was overacting a bit wanting to deep clean sterilising.

I mean I don't know... I feel like I did everything I could. I don't feel like I could have taken it to sterilising with out infecting something... or maybe I could've I don't know.
Basically, do you think this situation sounded like my fault?
Original post by Alicehale6
So I work at a veterinary practice as a veterinary assistant, and on Tuesday I was asked to deep clean a room at work as there was a patient that had bruella, so I got gowned up with mask and gloves etc, cleaning the whole room firstly with detergent and then 30 minutes later with disinfectant.

I then once everything was wiped, I then released a bomb in the room (airgene aersoal disinfectant).

There was a small stitch up kit in the room as well, normally if there's a kit in an infectious case we soak them in this blue disinfectant which I didn't have with me as I didn't know there was a kit until I went in and the stuff was in theatre.

I made sure to wiped the instruments in the kit and was still in the room once it was bombed, I was thinking about taking it to be soaked but then I thought then it might not be ideal as then I'm risking touching areas/ handles etc and getting them infected.

So yesterday when I came into work, Jen one of the sterling technicians closed of sterilising as a bruella risk as someone, I'm assuming one of the students left the stitch up kit on the side just with a note saying bruella.
So then Jen decided to deep clean sterilising as a precaution.

I kind of feel like it was sort of my fault in a way that she had to close and deep clean sterilising, since I deep cleaned that room and left the kit in there.

I told her that and she said that I did all I was supposed to do. And she also mentioned that my boss said to Jen that she was overacting a bit wanting to deep clean sterilising.

I mean I don't know... I feel like I did everything I could. I don't feel like I could have taken it to sterilising with out infecting something... or maybe I could've I don't know.
Basically, do you think this situation sounded like my fault?

You say, "normally if there's a kit in an infectious case we soak them in this blue disinfectant".How would you (or anyone else) normally establish that there's a potentially contaminated stitch-up kit present, and so know to take some blue disinfectant into the room to be cleaned?

The process you describe suggests that as soon as you start cleaning (and therefore touching surfaces with your gloves), you can't leave the room until the disinfection process is complete for feed or carrying the infection elsewhere. Is that how it works?

So, in an ideal world, you'd have spotted the kit at the start of the process, and gone to fetch some blue disinfectant - or you'd have taken some in with you in the first place in case there was a kit in the room. Is this what you're beating yourself up over - not having the foresight to know that the blue disinfectant would be required?

It seems to me that once you'd identified that there was a kit present, it was too late to do anything about it. The veterinary practice has a policy of requiring kits to be soaked in blue disinfectant, but you couldn't leave the room to go and fetch some. So there was no good option at that point.

The fact that Jen has said you did all were supposed to do, and that her manager felt like she was overreacting, suggests that the only person who things you could have done things better is you.

Knowing what happened, if you were faced with the same situation again, would you do anything differently? If not, then it seems likely that there was nothing you could have some differently. Alternatively, you've just learned from this experience - which is valuable in itself.
Sorry if I'm misreading here, but it sounds like no patients were at risk, no people were at risk, and no one is upset with you?
It is a minor mistake, one that you have owned up to and that didn't put anyone at risk, so I think you need to forgive yourself for this.

Jen's time was slightly wasted, but she doesn't seem to mind. You can now learn from this and you'll never make this mistake again! Do you think you could've done anything better? It doesn't sound like it. Maybe in future if you're not sure what to do with the kit then ask, but it was a very very minor mistake and you should learn from it and forget it.

Vet Med sometimes provides us with bigger mistakes, so it's important to let the little things go so that we can emotionally handle the big thing when they come. :smile:
Sorry if I'm misreading here, but it sounds like no patients were at risk, no people were at risk, and no one is upset with you?It is a minor mistake, one that you have owned up to and that didn't put anyone at risk, so I think you need to forgive yourself for this.

Jen's time was slightly wasted, but she doesn't seem to mind. You can now learn from this and you'll never make this mistake again! Do you think you could've done anything better? It doesn't sound like it. Maybe in future if you're not sure what to do with the kit then ask, but it was a very very minor mistake and you should learn from it and forget it.

Vet Med sometimes provides us with bigger mistakes, so it's important to let the little things go so that we can emotionally handle the big thing when they come.
Reply 9
Original post by louisvbird
Sorry if I'm misreading here, but it sounds like no patients were at risk, no people were at risk, and no one is upset with you?
It is a minor mistake, one that you have owned up to and that didn't put anyone at risk, so I think you need to forgive yourself for this.
Jen's time was slightly wasted, but she doesn't seem to mind. You can now learn from this and you'll never make this mistake again! Do you think you could've done anything better? It doesn't sound like it. Maybe in future if you're not sure what to do with the kit then ask, but it was a very very minor mistake and you should learn from it and forget it.
Vet Med sometimes provides us with bigger mistakes, so it's important to let the little things go so that we can emotionally handle the big thing when they come. :smile:

I mean I feel like I clean the iit the best as I could with wiping it etc.
But since the student brought the kit to sterilising with just a note saying "bruella" do Jen deep cleaned sterilising not knowing what happened with the kit and if it was still contaminated.
I just felt like it was slightly my fault since I deep cleaned the room and obviously the kit was in there and people know I cleaned that area.
So I just fely responsible that she had to close of sterilising in order to deep clean, I mean I know she said that I did all I was supposed to and all that, but I don't know she might have just said that.
Like maybe I should have taken off my contaminated gloves, wore new ones and took the kit down in one hand so one hand wasn't contaminated.

I know I owned up, but it's just my boss has been on at my recently, watching me constantly and having meetings. Sometimes she brings up stupid things like I've cleaned an area that someone else has cleaned.
So I just don't want this to be another thing she brings up.
Original post by Alicehale6
I mean I feel like I clean the iit the best as I could with wiping it etc.
But since the student brought the kit to sterilising with just a note saying "bruella" do Jen deep cleaned sterilising not knowing what happened with the kit and if it was still contaminated.
I just felt like it was slightly my fault since I deep cleaned the room and obviously the kit was in there and people know I cleaned that area.
So I just fely responsible that she had to close of sterilising in order to deep clean, I mean I know she said that I did all I was supposed to and all that, but I don't know she might have just said that.
Like maybe I should have taken off my contaminated gloves, wore new ones and took the kit down in one hand so one hand wasn't contaminated.
I know I owned up, but it's just my boss has been on at my recently, watching me constantly and having meetings. Sometimes she brings up stupid things like I've cleaned an area that someone else has cleaned.
So I just don't want this to be another thing she brings up.

I don't think you've done anything wrong here, but whether your boss has a problem is something I don't know. But you've not put anyone at risk and you've done your job to the best of your ability. I think you should let this go. At most practices this isn't an issue at all.
Original post by Alicehale6
So I work at a veterinary practice as a veterinary assistant, and on Tuesday I was asked to deep clean a room at work as there was a patient that had bruella, so I got gowned up with mask and gloves etc, cleaning the whole room firstly with detergent and then 30 minutes later with disinfectant.
I then once everything was wiped, I then released a bomb in the room (airgene aersoal disinfectant).
There was a small stitch up kit in the room as well, normally if there's a kit in an infectious case we soak them in this blue disinfectant which I didn't have with me as I didn't know there was a kit until I went in and the stuff was in theatre.
I made sure to wiped the instruments in the kit and was still in the room once it was bombed, I was thinking about taking it to be soaked but then I thought then it might not be ideal as then I'm risking touching areas/ handles etc and getting them infected.
So yesterday when I came into work, Jen one of the sterling technicians closed of sterilising as a bruella risk as someone, I'm assuming one of the students left the stitch up kit on the side just with a note saying bruella.
So then Jen decided to deep clean sterilising as a precaution.
I kind of feel like it was sort of my fault in a way that she had to close and deep clean sterilising, since I deep cleaned that room and left the kit in there.
I told her that and she said that I did all I was supposed to do. And she also mentioned that my boss said to Jen that she was overacting a bit wanting to deep clean sterilising.
I mean I don't know... I feel like I did everything I could. I don't feel like I could have taken it to sterilising with out infecting something... or maybe I could've I don't know.
Basically, do you think this situation sounded like my fault?

Hi there :smile:

This is the second time you have been worried about your performance at a veterinary practice.

From reading your description you did a very thorough job of disinfection and, in my opinion, this would be adequate given where I work has treated several confirmed brucella cases with barrier nursing etc. and I have personally had similar disinfection protocols after dissections - university setting (maybe not even as rigorous as you were!). If someone is not happy with your work then take that feedback politely, but take it with a pinch of salt as you did a more than adequate job.

There is a big problem with resilience in the veterinary profession and feeling that you need to be perfect all the time. I am a qualified vet and I've made plenty of mistakes. Training and working within the veterinary profession is full of both positive and negative feedback. Learning to take feedback constructively is really important and if I had a student reacting this way when I was teaching them or trying to constructively improve their professionalism, I would be concerned for their wellbeing in this profession going forwards.

Taking feedback and not letting it get to you is a skill, one I am still developing myself, but I really think you need to practice not letting these very small things get to you. How will you react when something really big does happen? How will you cope when an animal dies? When an owner complains? When a case deteriorates? Even when its out of your control.

My two rules with taking feedback that I have developed over years are as follows:

1.Who is giving you the feedback? Is it someone you respect and trust to have your best interests at heart? Is it someone who actually understands and knows what they are talking about? For example, a member of the public might not understand how a disease works so might be angry at you about an outcome when you have no control and they are actually upset at the outcome and not you personally. Grief can cause a lot of misplaced emotion.

If the answer is the feedback is coming from someone who knows and understands the situation, who you respect and want to emulate as a professional and who you know is trying to help you I move on to step 2. If the answer is the feedback is coming from someone who doesn't understand the situation, who you don't think acts like a professional you want to replicate and who is not being helpful or has your best interests at heart then I politely listen but won't take the feedback as seriously.

2.Reflection. So you have received some feedback about your performance from someone you know is trying to help you, who truly understands the situation and who you respect as a professional. Now, logically you think through if you think the feedback is justified....or not justified. Be kind to yourself, were you taught the protocol or not that you are being criticised on, you said yourself you didn't know where the materials were kept (no one showed you). If you weigh up why a situation happened, if you logically are responsible or if it was out of your control then often you find it might not be your fault.

With feedback it is important to be kind to yourself, sometimes it can feel like people constantly give negative criticism and that is exhausting. But change your mindset about negative feedback and take it as someone caring about you.

I know if I was talking to a colleague or veterinary student (I often teach the final years) about their performance, it would never be from a point of annoyance. It would be because I want to protect them from the consequences that I myself might have experienced. E.g. I had a student who made a comment that I know if a client had heard would cause a complaint. Making them aware of this so that they don't have that happen to them is a kindness its not to be mean and picky. It means I don't want them to go through a client complaint for a situation which I can predict with experience and warn them about.
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by FarmVet
Hi there :smile:
This is the second time you have been worried about your performance at a veterinary practice.
From reading your description you did a very thorough job of disinfection and, in my opinion, this would be adequate given where I work has treated several confirmed brucella cases with barrier nursing etc. and I have personally had similar disinfection protocols after dissections - university setting (maybe not even as rigorous as you were!). If someone is not happy with your work then take that feedback politely, but take it with a pinch of salt as you did a more than adequate job.
There is a big problem with resilience in the veterinary profession and feeling that you need to be perfect all the time. I am a qualified vet and I've made plenty of mistakes. Training and working within the veterinary profession is full of both positive and negative feedback. Learning to take feedback constructively is really important and if I had a student reacting this way when I was teaching them or trying to constructively improve their professionalism, I would be concerned for their wellbeing in this profession going forwards.
Taking feedback and not letting it get to you is a skill, one I am still developing myself, but I really think you need to practice not letting these very small things get to you. How will you react when something really big does happen? How will you cope when an animal dies? When an owner complains? When a case deteriorates? Even when its out of your control.
My two rules with taking feedback that I have developed over years are as follows:
1.Who is giving you the feedback? Is it someone you respect and trust to have your best interests at heart? Is it someone who actually understands and knows what they are talking about? For example, a member of the public might not understand how a disease works so might be angry at you about an outcome when you have no control and they are actually upset at the outcome and not you personally. Grief can cause a lot of misplaced emotion.
If the answer is the feedback is coming from someone who knows and understands the situation, who you respect and want to emulate as a professional and who you know is trying to help you I move on to step 2. If the answer is the feedback is coming from someone who doesn't understand the situation, who you don't think acts like a professional you want to replicate and who is not being helpful or has your best interests at heart then I politely listen but won't take the feedback as seriously.
2.Reflection. So you have received some feedback about your performance from someone you know is trying to help you, who truly understands the situation and who you respect as a professional. Now, logically you think through if you think the feedback is justified....or not justified. Be kind to yourself, were you taught the protocol or not that you are being criticised on, you said yourself you didn't know where the materials were kept (no one showed you). If you weigh up why a situation happened, if you logically are responsible or if it was out of your control then often you find it might not be your fault.
With feedback it is important to be kind to yourself, sometimes it can feel like people constantly give negative criticism and that is exhausting. But change your mindset about negative feedback and take it as someone caring about you.
I know if I was talking to a colleague or veterinary student (I often teach the final years) about their performance, it would never be from a point of annoyance. It would be because I want to protect them from the consequences that I myself might have experienced. E.g. I had a student who made a comment that I know if a client had heard would cause a complaint. Making them aware of this so that they don't have that happen to them is a kindness its not to be mean and picky. It means I don't want them to go through a client complaint for a situation which I can predict with experience and warn them about.

P.S. sorry for my ramble, giving and receiving feedback as a vet is a very big issue in the profession which has caused a lot of my colleagues to leave practice so its close to my heart.

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