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Politics, Philosophy and Law LLB vs Law LLB at KCL

(Sorry in advance, this thread is quite long!)

I'm currently in Year 12 studying philosophy, psychology and politics and will be applying to study law in September for 2025 entry. I've recently completed my mocks and received a grade back on the subject I thought I performed the worst in (psychology) and since my grade ended up being really good, I'm considering being more aspirational with my university options. My current options are Nottingham, Leeds, Manchester, York and Birmingham, but I'm thinking of switching Birmingham to a KCL law course. I'm having trouble deciding between PPL and straight law. I love the modules in both courses, but I definitely like the idea of being able to study more philosophy related modules, such as ethics and modern philosophy. I think the PPL course would definitely suit me well, however I noticed that there aren't many politics modules at all and that they are only really in second year. I'd like to know from anyone who has done or is currently on the course if there are more politics modules available in later years, as politics is currently my favourite subject and I would like it if I could study more politics beyond second year. My only other concern with PPL is that I'd have to wait a bit longer before starting my legal career. I want to go into commercial law, and obviously lots of firms have first year schemes, but I'm wondering whether I'd still be eligible to apply for them, as my degree would be four years instead of three. Would I have to apply for vacation schemes in third year? I do like the straight law degree as well, but it is definitely more competitive. On UCAS it says that 3/20 applicants receive an offer, which would mean the offer rate is 15%, but for PPL it is 3/10, so 30%. If I were to apply to PPL, it would probably end up being my 1st or 2nd choice with Nottingham being my other top choice, but if I were to apply to straight law, it would likely end up being my 3rd or 4th choice. I don't know whether there is any point in sitting the LNAT for a course that isn't even one of my top two, but I'm also worried about how studying PPL will impact the rate at which my career progresses. I had previously been considering doing a masters after my undergrad, but after speaking to a current law student about it, apparently it doesn't actually have many benefits when sitting the SQE. If there are any current or previous students at KCL law, particularly PPL students who could provide me with some more information regarding the differences between the two or anybody who can give me some more advice about doing a 4 year degree instead of a 3 year degree, career options and postgraduate studies in law, I would be very grateful. :smile:
You can become a lawyer from PPL.

No 3 vs 4-year courses won't matter except the extra cost, yes you would apply for summer vac schemes in your 3rd year.
Waterfront bar, King's College
King's College London
London
Reply 2
Original post by jumpman123
You can become a lawyer from PPL.
No 3 vs 4-year courses won't matter except the extra cost, yes you would apply for summer vac schemes in your 3rd year.

Thank you for answering some of my questions. If you don't mind, I have a few more questions for you.

Since I would only be able to apply to vacation schemes in the third year, would it be a good idea to use the first year as sort of a 'gap year' in terms of work experience (e.g. would gaining work experience placements that year make me stand out more as an applicant for TCs, first year schemes and vacation schemes)?

Do you have any more information in regards to the modules offered for PPL (e.g. if politics modules are offered beyond the second year)?

I've decided to apply to straight law LLB courses for three of my university choices (York, Leeds and Nottingham), law with politics at Manchester and KCL for politics, philosophy and law. How should I structure my personal statement to include all three subjects? I know the vast majority should be focused in law, but since I already take politics and philosophy for A levels, should I spend some time talking about those as well? I've already completed my personal statement, but I am going to make edits, as I did a whole section on psychology (explores international criminal law and obedience) that I'm thinking of replacing with politics, so I can talk more about the impacts of foreign policy on trade and legislation. I also want to develop my philosophy section a little more which is about medical law, ethics and work experience.

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