The Student Room Group

What makes attractive extroverts feel entitled to whine about their partners?

Most of these whiny attractive extroverts appear to be changing partners every year. They don't realise how privileged they are. Many men are disabled to the point of not being able to date once even they have reached their late twenties.

When they break down, they don't have a shoulder to cry on, neither do they have anyone willing to hug nor kiss them. Many of them spend most of their bedtime crying under their blankets. They may even die and rot in their houses without anyone checking on them.

As such, I don't see what gives those attractive extroverts the prerogative to make petty complaints about their partners to others. Those who don't realise how well-off they are tend to be the most ungrateful folks who don't deserve love at all - I mean it.

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Reply 1
To which 'whiny attractive extroverts' are you referring? Maybe they have a reason to be critical of a partner and to move on from a relationship?
Reply 2
So, you’ll never get anywhere by being bitter and critical of people that are more successful than yourself. Focus on playing to your strengths, doing what you can on your weaknesses, and then something good might work out for you. Everyone has to play the hand they’re given to the best of their ability
(edited 2 weeks ago)
This seems like one of those extraordinarily specific whinges about a small group of people rather than a wider phenomenon.
It's ironic that there are men who, on paper, should find it easy to get into relationships. For example, I am intelligent and get told every once in a while that I am good looking or handsome, and there are plenty of people who like being around me. Despite all that I still find it very difficult to get into relationships, my last one being close to five years ago. I've tried dating apps but I never have any success on them, which makes me disbelieve anyone who says I'm good looking, and almost every girl that I have ever liked has not been into me.

I can't lie about it. I feel angry with myself every day because of it. I feel sad about it, obviously. I don't know what I'm doing wrong or what this thing about me that drives relationships away from me is. But when I have my biweekly moment of happiness (before you may ask: yes, I do have counselling, but no, it's made me feel worse) I feel a bit more clear about it and think 'surely I can't be that bad?' And I don't think I am, but the rejection on dating apps gets to me. Perhaps I really am ugly, and whereas my friends and 'friends' in real life try to make me feel better by glossing over the gory details, people on dating apps are more honest and truthful about how I look. There has to be at least one girl who would actually want to be with me, but I haven't found her yet and sometimes I worry that I never will, or only will long after my prime, which really should be right now. The search continues, I guess.
Reply 5
In dating it’s the minority very attractive folk, in looks or personality, where things lands on a plate. And even for them there is angst.
Everyone else has to work hard for it. Dating apps are toxic, reducing romance to something less rewarding than a job interview. I think you have the right attitude and with patience and tenacity something good will come up
Original post by Zarek
In dating it’s the minority very attractive folk, in looks or personality, where things lands on a plate. And even for them there is angst.
Everyone else has to work hard for it. Dating apps are toxic, reducing romance to something less rewarding than a job interview. I think you have the right attitude and with patience and tenacity something good will come up

Assuming you were responding to me I'd like to add to that and say that most people fall into the average category when it comes to looks. I don't think there are many truly ugly people and I don't think there are many truly beautiful people either. My friends and I agree that I'd be a great husband and father. If I did get into a relationship that went that far I'd be alright (and would feel much better about myself), but getting there is the challenge. I wish that hypothetically a girl that I had a crush on would take a chance on me and I'd prove my worth beyond the first impressions, but I doubt it's a likely thing to happen.
Why would you presume to be a gatekeeper for complaining? 😅
Reply 8
Original post by Doomotron
Assuming you were responding to me I'd like to add to that and say that most people fall into the average category when it comes to looks. I don't think there are many truly ugly people and I don't think there are many truly beautiful people either. My friends and I agree that I'd be a great husband and father. If I did get into a relationship that went that far I'd be alright (and would feel much better about myself), but getting there is the challenge. I wish that hypothetically a girl that I had a crush on would take a chance on me and I'd prove my worth beyond the first impressions, but I doubt it's a likely thing to happen.

It will work out. Just flirt widely and try hardest where someone shows interest
Original post by Zarek
It will work out. Just flirt widely and try hardest where someone shows interest

I do try, although the last time a girl showed interest in me was nine years ago or so, which doesn't fill me with confidence.
Original post by Surnia
To which 'whiny attractive extroverts' are you referring? Maybe they have a reason to be critical of a partner and to move on from a relationship?

No one is interested in their private life. Take their stuff somewhere else.
Original post by Zarek
So, you’ll never get anywhere by being bitter and critical of people that are more successful than yourself. Focus on playing to your strengths, doing what you can on your weaknesses, and then something good might work out for you. Everyone has to play the hand they’re given to the best of their ability

You are in no position to invalidate my perceptions. Success doesn't precludes you from criticism. Are we not criticising Donald Trump because he was the POTUS?
Original post by Anonymous
You are in no position to invalidate my perceptions. Success doesn't precludes you from criticism. Are we not criticising Donald Trump because he was the POTUS?

I'm not sure how Donald Trump is relevant to this...

A problem in a relationship is still a problem. Yes, they may find it easier to get into relationships but if you're going to put time and effort into a relationship and it turns out badly they still have the right to be unhappy about it.
Reply 13
Original post by Anonymous
You are in no position to invalidate my perceptions. Success doesn't precludes you from criticism. Are we not criticising Donald Trump because he was the POTUS?
What on earth are you talking about. You’ll not make any progress with this attitude
Reply 14
Original post by Anonymous
No one is interested in their private life. Take their stuff somewhere else.

Well, you clearly have an interest or you wouldn't know what they are up to. Whose private life, though? Give some examples of these 'whiny attractive extroverts', by name.
If they are changing partner every year then clearly quite a few people are interested in their private life.
Original post by Zarek
What on earth are you talking about. You’ll not make any progress with this attitude

It would be better if you can drop your ego and listen to people's viewpoints.
Original post by Anonymous
It would be better if you can drop your ego and listen to people's viewpoints.

Likewise.
Reply 18
Original post by anonymous
It would be better if you can drop your ego and listen to people's viewpoints.

I don’t agree with a viewpoint that someone should find you attractive, if they don’t
(edited 2 weeks ago)
Original post by Zarek
I don’t agree with a viewpoint that someone should find you attractive, if they don’t

It is a straw man attack.

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