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Can I go into law or finance with an anthropology degree
Reply 1
Original post by winner83
Can I go into law or finance with an anthropology degree

I can’t speak for finance but for law it is possible. If you wish to become a barrister, you’ll need to do a conversion degree in law and sit the bar exam, then apply for a pupillage. If you want to become a solicitor, under the new SQE route, a law degree is not a requirement but is generally recommended by most employers if you want to sit the exam. You can opt for a conversion degree or just take SQE preparation courses. Some employers may even pay for your conversion degree. You’ll also need two years qualifying work experience, which is why many aspiring solicitors will try to secure a training contract, which allows you to train as a solicitor in a law firm, be paid a salary and have the firm pay for your SQE fees (and any prep courses they require trainees to complete).
Everyone who wishes to become a solicitor must do a two year training contract. It's not optional. The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) is, as its name indicates, a Diploma, not a degree. It takes a year to obtain a GDL. The Bar course takes a year, and pupillage lasts a year.

It appears that roughly half of those practising law in the UK have law degrees, and the other half have degrees in this, that, and the other.
Yeah you can, but it’s not the best as you probably won’t be seen as well-suited for the job due to you not having a degree in that field. I’m sure that if you put in the work to stand out, your be good though
Adding onto my previous reply, if your degree from a prestigious uni, they should be more lenient/accepting that your degree isn’t in that field
Original post by carter03052
Yeah you can, but it’s not the best as you probably won’t be seen as well-suited for the job due to you not having a degree in that field. I’m sure that if you put in the work to stand out, your be good though

This is incorrect, with regard to a legal career. As noted above, approx half of the lawyers in the UK, including many senior judges, do not have law degrees. The absence of a law degree makes no difference to career chances in the UK legal professions.

A person's career need not be related to their undergraduate degree subject. There are a few exceptions: for example, nobody can be a doctor without a medical degree, and it is hard to make it as an engineer without a degree in engineering. Academics need degrees relating to their field of teaching and research. But, apart from the few exceptions, more or less any degree in any subject can lead to a wide variety of careers. Despite what all those grumpy uncles say, no rigorous academic degree is useless.
(edited 1 month ago)

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