The Student Room Group

EM vs CS

hello. i am an undergrad student currently studying economics and maths in Pakistan. I am interested in studying economics and I do love maths but thinking of switching to Computer Science degree bcs in Pakistan, Econ and Math graduates arent v valued. Additionally, i am a religious person and would not prefer working in banks or any institutions which have their larger chunk of revenue coming from charging interest- so insurance companies, bank, etc are out. I have not really studied computer sciences before; however, I did take a python course. I found it interesting but ive heard from CS people that Python isnt the best representative of CS in its full glory. What should I do? How do i make the choice?
Original post by kashish900
hello. i am an undergrad student currently studying economics and maths in Pakistan. I am interested in studying economics and I do love maths but thinking of switching to Computer Science degree bcs in Pakistan, Econ and Math graduates arent v valued. Additionally, i am a religious person and would not prefer working in banks or any institutions which have their larger chunk of revenue coming from charging interest- so insurance companies, bank, etc are out. I have not really studied computer sciences before; however, I did take a python course. I found it interesting but ive heard from CS people that Python isnt the best representative of CS in its full glory. What should I do? How do i make the choice?

I think it's a little presumptuous to think that you can only work in finance or banking with a degree in economics and maths. Whilst I can't claim I know the full extent of the Pakistani job market, I am confident that you can do more than just banking or finance with the degree.
For one, you can become a CA with just your International A Levels (or equivalent, but iALs are taught in Pakistan as far as I know)

A degree in economics by definition helps you to become an economist, and it's often required in a number of countries (especially those that don't have apprenticeships on offer). I think this is a requirement in Pakistan, but you might need to check. At the very least, you can go into civil service with the degree.

In terms of a computer science degree, no Python is probably too new of a language to be widely taught in some universities around the world, although many are picking it up. Instead, the more mainstream languages for CS degrees are in C++ and Java, both of which are object oriented languages similar to Python i.e. if you are able to pick up the syntax for Python, the other languages aren't that more difficult to pick up (even though they're significantly more cumbersome).
Other than programming, you should cover computational mathematics, computer and software engineering, data structures, and algorithms (i.e. a lot of applied maths). Then you have your electives, which can vary from degree to degree and university to university (these electives can include AI, game design, UX, robotics, cyber security, graphics). I don't know what specific degree you would do, so you would need to check the content of the degree to confirm the above.

Having said that, you can do a computer science master's degree with an undergrad in mathematics. Some universities might be stricter with some requirements and ask for an undergrad in computer science or a related subject only, but a standard maths degree with some programming units can sometimes be adequate for a number of masters'. Failing that, there are some master's degrees in computer science that only require an undergrad degree in any subject, but these are more like conversion courses as opposed to advanced computer science that builds on the knowledge from your undergrad degree in CS.

Quick Reply