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Theoretical perspectives on reflection in relation to professional development...

As part of my unit assignemnt i am required to post in an open forum regarding theoretical perspectives in relation to profesional development.

here is my thoughts.... Theoretical perspectives on reflection in relation to professional development emphasise the importance of self-awareness, continuous learning, and critical thinking in improving professional practice.

Graham Gibbs proposes a structured cycle for reflection, involving stages such as description, feelings, evaluation, analysis, conclusion, and action plan. This structured approach helps professionals systematically reflect on their experiences to derive actionable insights. It was developed in 1988 and is designed to help individuals think systematically about the phases of an experience or activity.
The cycle consists of six stages:
Description: This stage involves describing the experience without drawing conclusions or making judgments.
Feelings: This stage focuses on the emotions and thoughts experienced during the event.
Evaluation: This stage involves assessing the experience, considering both the positive and negative aspects.
Analysis: This stage requires a deeper examination of why things happened the way they did.
Conclusion: This stage is about drawing conclusions from the experience.
Action Plan: This stage involves planning how to handle similar situations in the future.

John Dewey posits that reflection is an active, persistent, and careful consideration of beliefs or practices in light of supporting evidence and future consequences. In professional development, this means practitioners must engage in ongoing evaluation of their experiences to improve their practice.

Donald Schön differentiates between reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action. Reflection-in-action occurs during the event, allowing for immediate adjustments, while reflection-on-action happens after the event, leading to deeper insights and long-term professional growth.

David Kolb’s model emphasizes the role of:
Concrete experience- This stage involves the actual experience or encounter with something in the real world. It could be anything from a specific event to a hands-on activity.

Reflective observation- After the experience, individuals reflect on what happened, considering the outcome, the emotions involved, and any insights gained. This phase involves introspection and analysis.

Abstract conceptualization- In this stage, individuals try to make sense of their observations and experiences by forming generalisations, theories, or concepts. They may try to understand the underlying principles or patterns.

Active experimentation in learning- Finally, individuals apply what they've learned from their reflections and conceptualisations. They engage in new experiences or activities, experimenting with different approaches and strategies based on their insights.. For professionals, this means learning from direct experiences, reflecting on them, conceptualising lessons, and applying them in future practice.

Jack Mezirow suggests that critical reflection can lead to transformative learning, where individuals challenge and change their deeply held beliefs and assumptions. This transformative aspect is crucial for profound professional development and personal growth.

Stephen Brookfield suggests using four lenses for reflection: the autobiographical lens (self-reflection), the student’s lens (feedback from others), the colleague’s lens (peer review), and the theoretical lens (literature and theories).
This multi-faceted approach ensures a comprehensive reflection process, leading to holistic professional development.

Borton's Reflective Model is a framework used to guide reflective practice, particularly in the context of education, healthcare, and other professional development fields.
Developed by Terry Borton in 1970, the model is designed to help individuals systematically reflect on their experiences and improve their practice through a structured process.
Borton’s model is based on three simple but powerful questions:
What? So What? Now What?...
-What? This phase involves describing the experience or situation. It focuses on gathering factual information without interpreting or analysing it. Questions to consider: What happened? What did I do? What did others do? What was the outcome?

-So What? In this phase, the focus is on interpreting and analysing the experience. It involves considering the significance of the event and understanding the emotions and reactions involved. Questions to consider: Why did it happen? What were the underlying causes? How did it affect me or others? What did I learn from this experience? What were the positives and negatives?

-Now What? This phase is about applying the insights gained from the reflection to future practice. It involves planning how to handle similar situations in the future and making concrete plans for improvement. Questions to consider: What will I do differently next time? How can I apply what I’ve learned? What steps can I take to improve my practice? What resources or support do I need to make these changes?
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by Harrison3483249
Theoretical perspectives on reflection in relation to professional development emphasise the importance of self-awareness, continuous learning, and critical thinking in improving professional practice.
Graham Gibbs proposes a structured cycle for reflection, involving stages such as description, feelings, evaluation, analysis, conclusion, and action plan. This structured approach helps professionals systematically reflect on their experiences to derive actionable insights. It was developed in 1988 and is designed to help individuals think systematically about the phases of an experience or activity.
The cycle consists of six stages:
Description: This stage involves describing the experience without drawing conclusions or making judgments.
Feelings: This stage focuses on the emotions and thoughts experienced during the event.
Evaluation: This stage involves assessing the experience, considering both the positive and negative aspects.
Analysis: This stage requires a deeper examination of why things happened the way they did.
Conclusion: This stage is about drawing conclusions from the experience.
Action Plan: This stage involves planning how to handle similar situations in the future.
John Dewey posits that reflection is an active, persistent, and careful consideration of beliefs or practices in light of supporting evidence and future consequences. In professional development, this means practitioners must engage in ongoing evaluation of their experiences to improve their practice.
Donald Schön differentiates between reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action. Reflection-in-action occurs during the event, allowing for immediate adjustments, while reflection-on-action happens after the event, leading to deeper insights and long-term professional growth.
David Kolb’s model emphasizes the role of:
Concrete experience- This stage involves the actual experience or encounter with something in the real world. It could be anything from a specific event to a hands-on activity.
Reflective observation- After the experience, individuals reflect on what happened, considering the outcome, the emotions involved, and any insights gained. This phase involves introspection and analysis.
Abstract conceptualization- In this stage, individuals try to make sense of their observations and experiences by forming generalisations, theories, or concepts. They may try to understand the underlying principles or patterns.
Active experimentation in learning- Finally, individuals apply what they've learned from their reflections and conceptualisations. They engage in new experiences or activities, experimenting with different approaches and strategies based on their insights.. For professionals, this means learning from direct experiences, reflecting on them, conceptualising lessons, and applying them in future practice.
Jack Mezirow suggests that critical reflection can lead to transformative learning, where individuals challenge and change their deeply held beliefs and assumptions. This transformative aspect is crucial for profound professional development and personal growth.
Stephen Brookfield suggests using four lenses for reflection: the autobiographical lens (self-reflection), the student’s lens (feedback from others), the colleague’s lens (peer review), and the theoretical lens (literature and theories).
This multi-faceted approach ensures a comprehensive reflection process, leading to holistic professional development.
Borton's Reflective Model is a framework used to guide reflective practice, particularly in the context of education, healthcare, and other professional development fields.
Developed by Terry Borton in 1970, the model is designed to help individuals systematically reflect on their experiences and improve their practice through a structured process.
Borton’s model is based on three simple but powerful questions:
What? So What? Now What?...
-What? This phase involves describing the experience or situation. It focuses on gathering factual information without interpreting or analysing it. Questions to consider: What happened? What did I do? What did others do? What was the outcome?
-So What? In this phase, the focus is on interpreting and analysing the experience. It involves considering the significance of the event and understanding the emotions and reactions involved. Questions to consider: Why did it happen? What were the underlying causes? How did it affect me or others? What did I learn from this experience? What were the positives and negatives?
-Now What? This phase is about applying the insights gained from the reflection to future practice. It involves planning how to handle similar situations in the future and making concrete plans for improvement. Questions to consider: What will I do differently next time? How can I apply what I’ve learned? What steps can I take to improve my practice? What resources or support do I need to make these changes?

Is this supposed to be a question or is the whole thing your assignment brief? If it's a question, what is your specific question? Noone is going to do your assignment for you.
Original post by MindMax2000
Is this supposed to be a question or is the whole thing your assignment brief? If it's a question, what is your specific question? Noone is going to do your assignment for you.

Apologies MindMax. My assignment is complete and sent off. Part of the unit required me to post my theoretical perspective research and findings in a forum.

No one needs to write my assignment for me 😁
Original post by Harrison3483249
Apologies MindMax. My assignment is complete and sent off. Part of the unit required me to post my theoretical perspective research and findings in a forum.
No one needs to write my assignment for me 😁

OK, not sure why they require you to post this in a forum or what they expect you to get from this. Such an odd thing to do (I've never seen this in any assignment or understand the reasoning behind this).

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