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Further maths kids increasing the grade boundaries? A level maths 2024 edexcel

For A Level maths, do exam boards consider the fact that if someone scores very well that they do further maths? Does that account into the grade boundaries bc everyone I know who does further maths has predicted over 90 in the unofficial mark schemes, so I rlly hope they do I asked like 20 further maths kids.
This is all for Edexcel a level maths.

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Original post by Tarniana
For A Level maths, do exam boards consider the fact that if someone scores very well that they do further maths? Does that account into the grade boundaries bc everyone I know who does further maths has predicted over 90 in the unofficial mark schemes, so I rlly hope they do I asked like 20 further maths kids.
This is all for Edexcel a level maths.

Are you suggesting that exam boards might set different grades boundaries in A level Maths for those who are also doing A level Further Maths and those who are not? No - they don't do that. They mark each paper, and set the grade boundaries, based upon that one exam - without reference to any other exams each student might be taking.

An exam is designed to measure a student's ability in a given subject. If they happen to be good at that subject due to some benefit gained from studying a related subject, why should they be penalised for that fact?
Reply 2
Students who study further maths finish all the A Level content in year 12 so they have an extra year to refine their skills comapared to normal maths kids. So of course they will have an advantage to some extent, my question is that if they compare the results between normal maths kids and further maths kids then the grade boundaries will be a bit more fair, otherwise further maths kids are just increasing the grade boundaries for the rest of us.
Original post by Tarniana
... my question is that if they compare the results between normal maths kids and further maths kids...

As I said above, they do not.
Original post by Tarniana
Students who study further maths finish all the A Level content in year 12 so they have an extra year to refine their skills comapared to normal maths kids. So of course they will have an advantage to some extent, my question is that if they compare the results between normal maths kids and further maths kids then the grade boundaries will be a bit more fair, otherwise further maths kids are just increasing the grade boundaries for the rest of us.


You do understand that most further maths students do 4 A levels compared to 3A levels that most other students do. In a way, they get almost the same amount of revision time for doing maths and even lesser time for other subjects. Would you suggest that students doing 4 A levels should get lenient grade boundaries than students doing 3 A levels.
Also, not every school completes A level maths syllabus in Y12, some do AS content of both FM and regular maths in Y12. How are the boards going to differentiate then.
Original post by Tarniana
Students who study further maths finish all the A Level content in year 12 so they have an extra year to refine their skills comapared to normal maths kids. So of course they will have an advantage to some extent, my question is that if they compare the results between normal maths kids and further maths kids then the grade boundaries will be a bit more fair, otherwise further maths kids are just increasing the grade boundaries for the rest of us.
As someone who does a level further maths, i find they are very different and i often do better in further maths, also at my school we do maths and further maths alongside each other in year 12 and 13 so we don’t have an extra year.
No, exam boards do not differentiate between students taking Further Maths and those taking just Maths. This is because the content is very different; they are essentially two completely separate subjects. Taking Further Maths could indeed help develop problem-solving skills, which might be beneficial in regular Maths. However, exam boards will not consider this, just as they do not consider how studying Maths might aid in applied maths for other subjects like Biology or Economics, as there is no real advantage. Moreover, many schools, including mine, do not follow the A-level syllabus in Year 12. Instead, they teach AS Maths and AS Further Maths in the first year, and then cover the second-year content in Year 13.
Original post by Melody0304
No, exam boards do not differentiate between students taking Further Maths and those taking just Maths. This is because the content is very different; they are essentially two completely separate subjects. Taking Further Maths could indeed help develop problem-solving skills, which might be beneficial in regular Maths. However, exam boards will not consider this, just as they do not consider how studying Maths might aid in applied maths for other subjects like Biology or Economics, as there is no real advantage. Moreover, many schools, including mine, do not follow the A-level syllabus in Year 12. Instead, they teach AS Maths and AS Further Maths in the first year, and then cover the second-year content in Year 13.

Yes but I read somewhere that they ensure that some people doing normal maths get A*s also.
Unless i read wrong
Original post by jamest0394q
Yes but I read somewhere that they ensure that some people doing normal maths get A*s also.
Unless i read wrong
I can guarantee that some people who do just A level Maths will achieve A*s- the exam board does not need to 'ensure' this. Grades are determined solely through the grade boundaries, which are set so a top certain percentage of people achieve A*s, and so on. There will definitely be people within this percentage who do not take Further Maths- after all, as I mentioned, they are completely separate A levels, with different content.
Original post by Melody0304
I can guarantee that some people who do just A level Maths will achieve A*s- the exam board does not need to 'ensure' this. Grades are determined solely through the grade boundaries, which are set so a top certain percentage of people achieve A*s, and so on. There will definitely be people within this percentage who do not take Further Maths- after all, as I mentioned, they are completely separate A levels, with different content.

Yh fair enough I just thought I'd heard it somewhere
Original post by Melody0304
I can guarantee that some people who do just A level Maths will achieve A*s- the exam board does not need to 'ensure' this. Grades are determined solely through the grade boundaries, which are set so a top certain percentage of people achieve A*s, and so on. There will definitely be people within this percentage who do not take Further Maths- after all, as I mentioned, they are completely separate A levels, with different content.

Well yh the contents different but Id assume the majority of people doing further maths will get As/A*s.
As someone who takes FM, yes we are better at maths bc we spend 2 alevels worth of time on mathematical problem solving, but most do 4 subjects. I don't have time to revise for maths alevels and just have to wing it considering how demanding FM and related subjects are. Also maths grade boundaries are so low. I do OCR but the gb for an A* in maths is mostly lower than FM. FM students will exceed 85% in normal maths most of the time but the boundary is like 74%, someone who just takes maths should be able to achieve this too IMO.
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by AlaciaAk
As someone who takes FM, yes we are better at maths bc we spend 2 alevels worth of time on mathematical problem solving, but most do 4 subjects. I don't have time to revise for maths alevels and just have to wing it considering how demanding FM and related subjects are. Also maths grade boundaries are so low. I do OCR but the gb for an A* in maths is mostly lower than FM. FM students will exceed 85% in normal maths most of the time but the boundary is like 74%, someone who just takes maths should be able to achieve this too IMO.

for edexcel it was 81% for A* last year
Original post by Tarniana
For A Level maths, do exam boards consider the fact that if someone scores very well that they do further maths? Does that account into the grade boundaries bc everyone I know who does further maths has predicted over 90 in the unofficial mark schemes, so I rlly hope they do I asked like 20 further maths kids.
This is all for Edexcel a level maths.


i do further and i got 90s for paper 1 and 2 but im scared for stats so im tryna see how low the grade boundaries are
Original post by Tarniana
Students who study further maths finish all the A Level content in year 12 so they have an extra year to refine their skills comapared to normal maths kids. So of course they will have an advantage to some extent, my question is that if they compare the results between normal maths kids and further maths kids then the grade boundaries will be a bit more fair, otherwise further maths kids are just increasing the grade boundaries for the rest of us.


we are increasing the grade boundaries but we dont get to refine out skills a lot of us like me forget maths is even a subject bcs we only do further in class and we sit the exam without having revised maths in a year
Reply 15
No, one variable to set grade distributions (and therefore grade boundaries) is the strength of the cohort. If the cohort was weaker e.g. if it was only made up of maths students then the grade boundaries would in theory be similar.

This is one reason why the grade distributions can vary a lot between subjects.
Original post by Tarniana
For A Level maths, do exam boards consider the fact that if someone scores very well that they do further maths? Does that account into the grade boundaries bc everyone I know who does further maths has predicted over 90 in the unofficial mark schemes, so I rlly hope they do I asked like 20 further maths kids.
This is all for Edexcel a level maths.

As a y12 taking further maths finishing for the year next week, my understanding of a level maths right now is almost certainly weaker than a y13 who spread it over two years. I think further maths will obviously make the normal a level easier and core pure 1 definitely does make the normal a level look easier already but I’ve had to learn a full a level in about 7.5 actual months of teaching and the downside of doing it so fast is that we have not a lot of time to refine skills.

Also in core pure 1 which I’ve done there’s about 1 topic that helps with a level maths, the rest are so unrelated. When people say further maths + maths have overlap, they’re wrong . I hope that explains why it’s not unfair to have equal grade boundaries. Further maths is a nightmare I don’t need a levels to be any harder .

That being said I do think the jump from y12 to y13 maths must be quite difficult for people doing it over two years , like if I found the jump in difficulty mid year hard enough it must be a nightmare coming back to y13 and feeling it .
Original post by Peach_rose34
As a y12 taking further maths finishing for the year next week, my understanding of a level maths right now is almost certainly weaker than a y13 who spread it over two years. I think further maths will obviously make the normal a level easier and core pure 1 definitely does make the normal a level look easier already but I’ve had to learn a full a level in about 7.5 actual months of teaching and the downside of doing it so fast is that we have not a lot of time to refine skills.
Also in core pure 1 which I’ve done there’s about 1 topic that helps with a level maths, the rest are so unrelated. When people say further maths + maths have overlap, they’re wrong . I hope that explains why it’s not unfair to have equal grade boundaries. Further maths is a nightmare I don’t need a levels to be any harder .
That being said I do think the jump from y12 to y13 maths must be quite difficult for people doing it over two years , like if I found the jump in difficulty mid year hard enough it must be a nightmare coming back to y13 and feeling it .

Most schools start the Year 2 part of A level in June not September. Many also set holiday work so students don't have 6 weeks of no Maths
Original post by Notnek
No, one variable to set grade distributions (and therefore grade boundaries) is the strength of the cohort. If the cohort was weaker e.g. if it was only made up of maths students then the grade boundaries would in theory be similar.
This is one reason why the grade distributions can vary a lot between subjects.

To be fair it’s very hard to determine strength of the cohort when paper difficulty varries so much year to year you can’t really get anywhere close to a reliable estimate
Original post by Muttley79
Most schools start the Year 2 part of A level in June not September. Many also set holiday work so students don't have 6 weeks of no Maths

That’s better than the system at my college

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