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calculating ocr a chem grade

Okay so i want to calculate my overall grade after my exams finish because each paper contributes differently to the overall grade. I googled how to do this and I don't understand how they calculated the weighing factor.
For me, it is each paper contributes this much to the overall grade:
Paper 1: 37% 100 marks
Paer 2: 37% 100 marks
Paper 3: 26% 70 marks
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by Sasuke1
Okay so i want to calculate my overall grade after my exams finish because each paper contributes differently to the overall grade. I googled how to do this and I don't understand how they calculated the weighing factor.
For me, it is each paper contributes this much to the overall grade:
Paper 1: 37% 100 marks
Paer 2: 37% 100 marks
Paper 3: 26% 70 marks

You don't cite the source of the image you have posted, but it is clearly not for any specific qualification. Instead, it's describing how weighting factors and weighting marks work generally, for qualifications to which they apply. They don't apply to OCR Chemistry A level. The weighting quoted in the image are just arbitrary examples. This is clear from the fact that they uses phrases like "For example".

OCR offer two different A level qualifications in Chemistry, which they call:
Chemistry A - specification code H432, and
Chemistry B (Salters) - specification code H433.

For Chemistry A there is no weighting between the papers. A mark in paper 1 is worth the same as a mark in paper 2 is worth the same as a mark in paper 3. You simply sum your marks across each of the three papers to get your total mark, out of 270 (100 + 100 + 70). The grade boundaries are in terms of a mark out of 270. See section 3j in the specification, which says: "A learner’s overall qualification grade for A Level in Chemistry A will be calculated by adding together their marks from the three examined components taken to give their total weighted mark."

For Chemistry B (Salters) there is no weighting between the papers. A mark in paper 1 is worth the same as a mark in paper 2 is worth the same as a mark in paper 3. You simply sum your marks across each of the three papers to get your total mark, out of 270 (110 + 100 + 60). The grade boundaries are in terms of a mark out of 270. See section 3j in the specification, which says: "A learner’s overall qualification grade for A Level in Chemistry B (Salters) will be calculated by adding together their marks from the three examined components taken to give their total weighted mark."

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