The Student Room Group

GCSE

How do I compare "REMAINS" to one of the power and conflict poems I need help please anyone smarttt!!!
Original post by stephanieagada
How do I compare "REMAINS" to one of the power and conflict poems I need help please anyone smarttt!!!

You can compare the psychological effects of war in remains with war photographer. You could talk about how in both remains and exposure, and bayonet charge, the soldiers are dehumanized to a certain extent.
Original post by stephanieagada
How do I compare "REMAINS" to one of the power and conflict poems I need help please anyone smarttt!!!

Get a list of the other 14 poems in the cluster. Then go down the list and, using the topic sentences/ideas below, decide which one(s) gives the clearest comparisons to make in an essay. (Yes I know this is more time-consuming than if I gave you answers directly, but you need to think about this - you don't get me in an exam.)

Remains refers to the long-lasting and/or harrowing (highly useful word for all the literature texts - look it up) effects of war on those that partake in it. What other poems from the poetry cluster have similar/contrasting views on war?

Remains has two parts to it: the first part is where the person recounts the events that unfolded, and the second part is where the aftermath of the conflict is highlighted. Is this similar to other poems?

Remains is rather personal - it has a conversational tone (talking about tone really helps, so get to grips with it) and is based on an interview(s?) Armitage conducted. It is also written in first person. What other poems have a close connection with the reader/idea/sense of belonging?

Remains could arguably be seen as a potential diatribe (also good word) by Armitage about the destructive effects of inner conflict. What other poems condemn war? What other poems highlight the futility (also good word) of war?
Original post by Super Sprinkles
Get a list of the other 14 poems in the cluster. Then go down the list and, using the topic sentences/ideas below, decide which one(s) gives the clearest comparisons to make in an essay. (Yes I know this is more time-consuming than if I gave you answers directly, but you need to think about this - you don't get me in an exam.)
Remains refers to the long-lasting and/or harrowing (highly useful word for all the literature texts - look it up) effects of war on those that partake in it. What other poems from the poetry cluster have similar/contrasting views on war?
Remains has two parts to it: the first part is where the person recounts the events that unfolded, and the second part is where the aftermath of the conflict is highlighted. Is this similar to other poems?
Remains is rather personal - it has a conversational tone (talking about tone really helps, so get to grips with it) and is based on an interview(s?) Armitage conducted. It is also written in first person. What other poems have a close connection with the reader/idea/sense of belonging?
Remains could arguably be seen as a potential diatribe (also good word) by Armitage about the destructive effects of inner conflict. What other poems condemn war? What other poems highlight the futility (also good word) of war?

Good technique! I WILL give you the answers - but just remember - you don't have me in the exam! 😉

14 poems -

1) Ozymandias
2) London
3) The Prelude: Stealing the Boat
4) My Last Duchess
5) The Charge of the Light Brigade (TCOTLB)
6) Exposure
7)Storm on the Island
8) Bayonet Charge
9) Remains
10) Poppies
11) War Photographer
12) Tissue
13) The Emigree
14) Kamikaze
15)Checking out Me History

1) Power of Humans -
Relevant Poems - Ozymandias, London, My Last Duchess, Storm on the Island, Tissue, Checking out Me History
How they do it differently - In "My Last Duchess" and "Checking out Me History", the poets explore how abuse their power, however in "Ozymandias" and "Tissue", it is conveyed that human power is ultimately temporary. In "My Last Duchess", the Duke seems obsessed with power - he even controls who sees the portrait of his last duchess. There are also hints that the Duke had his wife killed - "I gave commands; / Then all smiles stopped" has a sinister tone. Its lack of explanation suggests he doesn't feel he has to account for his actions. The poems for also reflects his absolute power - although there is a visitor present, we only hear the Duke's voice, and the use of rhyming couplets reflects his rigid control.
We can also see how Checking out Me History (John Agard) shows that humans can abuse their powers, because the speaker in the poem is angry that the people in charge of his education have given him a one sided view of history - he learnt lots about British history, but nothing about Caribbean heroes. Metaphors of blindness, e.g "Blind me to my own identity" show how the speaker feels he's been badly treated by those in power. The poem is written with historical misuses of power in mind - it mentions real figures from Caribbean history who revolted against slavery and European colonisation.
However, in Ozymandias and Tissue, we are still addressing the topic of power, but now we are looking at how human power is ultimately temporary. Ozymandias is presented as a ruler who abused his power - he's described as having a "sneer of cold command" and as arrogantly telling other rulers to look at his works and despair. However, the poem focuses on the temporary nature of the ruler's power. Ozymandias has no power now - there is nothing left of his "works" and even his statue has collapsed.
This is also shown in Tissue, where paper is used to symbolise human power - receipts can "fly our lives like paper kites", but they're fragile and easily destroyed, hinting at its impermanence (meaning it's not always to be there.) Paper maps show "borderlines" and other man-made features, but the sun "shines through" them, alluding to nature's enduring power. In the eighth stanza, the speaker talks about letting "daylight break / through capitals and monoliths". This is an image of natural power being greater than human power - "capitals and monoliths" represent human governments and buildings, but they are temporary compared to nature.

Please confirm whether this is of an acceptable standard. If you would like to receive more like this, please email "[email protected]". Thanks!

Quick Reply