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Help with a levels pls

I have just finished my GCSEs and I want do bio,chem and film studies for a levels. After the sciences exams, I know that the most that I got was a 5. I really want to do veterinary medicine in the future but my sixth form needs at least 7s to do it for a level. Idk how I'm gonna convince my sixth form or I might have to do them privately which means I will be doing 5 A levels which is way too stressful. It would be really nice if someone can give advice on this
It’s common to feel like you failed but get a higher mark when results roll in, so don’t fret! Otherwise, it might be worth retaking your exam and also to get your basics down
Reply 2
Original post by Mimosns
I have just finished my GCSEs and I want do bio,chem and film studies for a levels. After the sciences exams, I know that the most that I got was a 5. I really want to do veterinary medicine in the future but my sixth form needs at least 7s to do it for a level. Idk how I'm gonna convince my sixth form or I might have to do them privately which means I will be doing 5 A levels which is way too stressful. It would be really nice if someone can give advice on this

well you'll have to wait for ur actual results so think of a backup plan. Whether that is to retake gcse or go to a college or do it privately. Maybe in the summer look at apprentiships too. Most school have set grades u need to take the subject in a level and they wont bring it down for you so its a waiting game now
Hi there. Ex-science A-Level student here who changed his mind after yr 12 because I struggled a lot. I got 7/8 in GCSE Combined Science which, if scaled to separate science marking, is close to your situation.

First of all, most sixth forms require at least a 7s in sciences for A-Level Biology and Chemistry, that's true. They might change that under certain circumstances i.e. long illness, bereavement.

However, if you do not have certain circumstances, I have some advice to give to you regarding personal experience:
1) 5 A-Levels is ridiculous, not even Oxbridge needs that-- if you excuse my tone. It truly is bonkers. Beserk.
2) Studying A-Level privately is immensely difficult (and expensive if that applies), you need proper classes and tuition. I cannot overstate how big of a step up GCSE is from A-Level. Physics at A-Level is notorious, but the step up from GCSE Biology to A-Level Biology is not talked about but huge and you'll have a constantly-growing workload. Some teachers mention it casually but --SERIOUSLY-- the level of understanding and appliance of knowledge is at another level. It's not just something you make some flashcards for and have a go at a paper or two, it's not just Separate Science 2.0. A-Level Biology is at uni-level understanding and I remember very few people in the same class as me getting over a C during my time in Yr 12. These students, unlike me, did separate science, got 8s and 9s, and it did not prepare them much at all.
3) Sciency A-levels, even outside of the trilogy sciences, start out easy and GCSE-like but then increase sharply in difficulty after the first one or two terms.
4) If you're getting 5s, it could simply mean you don't have the work ethic, or the interest, in studying these subjects, which are very closely related to what you want to go on later on (plus you need really high grades to study vet). You like film studies, so maybe you could reconsider what you want to do when you're older (trust, its not too late) and evaluate what would be the best A-Levels to select for a potential career that's right for your interests.

Sorry for scaremongering, but PLEASE, I cannot overstate this further: A-Level is a big step up from GCSE. A lot of people say that A-Level is the hardest education you'll ever have to do. Don't make similar mistakes to me and focus on finding what's best for your well-being.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 4
Original post by turbidite
Hi there. Ex-science A-Level student here who changed his mind after yr 12 because I struggled a lot. I got 7/8 in GCSE Combined Science which, if scaled to separate science marking, is close to your situation.
First of all, most sixth forms require at least a 7s in sciences for A-Level Biology and Chemistry, that's true. They might change that under certain circumstances i.e. long illness, bereavement.
However, if you do not have certain circumstances, I have some advice to give to you regarding personal experience:
1) 5 A-Levels is ridiculous, not even Oxbridge needs that-- if you excuse my tone. It truly is bonkers. Beserk.
2) Studying A-Level privately is immensely difficult (and expensive if that applies), you need proper classes and tuition. I cannot overstate how big of a step up GCSE is from A-Level. Physics at A-Level is notorious, but the step up from GCSE Biology to A-Level Biology is not talked about but huge and you'll have a constantly-growing workload. Some teachers mention it casually but --SERIOUSLY-- the level of understanding and appliance of knowledge is at another level. It's not just something you make some flashcards for and have a go at a paper or two, it's not just Separate Science 2.0. A-Level Biology is at uni-level understanding and I remember very few people getting over a C during my time in Yr 12. These students, unlike me, did separate and it did not prepare them much.
3) Sciency A-levels, even outside of the trilogy sciences, start out easy and GCSE-like but then increase sharply in difficulty after the first one or two terms.
4) If you're getting 5s, it could simply mean you don't have the work ethic, or the interest, in studying these subjects. You like film studies, so maybe you could reconsider what you want to do when you're older (trust, its not too late) and evaluate what would be the best A-Levels to select for a potential career that's right for your interests.
Sorry for scaremongering, but PLEASE, I cannot overstate this further: A-Level is a big step up from GCSE. A lot of people say that A-Level is the hardest education you'll ever have to do. Don't make similar mistakes to me and focus on finding what's best for your well-being.


Thank you for taking Ur time to write this. It's just that for a number of years, I have always wanted to be a vet or do something related to zoology. During GCSEs, I was having a lot of panic attacks and most of my teachers hadn't already finished the science syllabus. During the holidays, I have really found the motivation to start revising for some reason but I dont see the point if I don't get the results
Original post by Mimosns
Thank you for taking Ur time to write this. It's just that for a number of years, I have always wanted to be a vet or do something related to zoology. During GCSEs, I was having a lot of panic attacks and most of my teachers hadn't already finished the science syllabus. During the holidays, I have really found the motivation to start revising for some reason but I dont see the point if I don't get the results

I've struggled with anxiety, and my motivation has gone up and down which has affected my revision plans and has made me doubt myself a lot (check my post history on my profile if you want and you'll see what I mean, I'm still tackling A-Levels and its pretty stressful regardless if you take the three sciences or not).

Veterinary Science is still a long career and requires a lot of resilience - as in it'll get very stressful both in study and later on)), research alternative careers in zoology and have an early look at UCAS.com-- which has info on what you'll be doing in these fields and see if they're right for you. There's also a careers quiz to see what you might like based on how you're most comfortable working, and for some inspiration here's a undergraduate course on marine biology and zoology at Bangor that doesn't need biology or chemistry as sciences if you take perhaps Geography and Psychology (or maths if you're good at that). The avg. grades for accepted students there is BCC. However, its likely that they will want biology in some way to show interest in the subject. Their other Zoological courses, which may be closer to Veterinary Science --conservation or ornithology sound interesting-- require a C in Biology which is very feasible compared to the usual A, or more realistically the A* you might need to study Veterinary Science.

Most importantly, don't lose hope. If you really want to do something to do with Zoology, like you're dead-set on it, you will do it. You'll be able to find the passion to study consistently. The teachers who couldn't go over the syllabus in time, they're boring. You will get to work with animals in some way, but being a Veterinarian is like being a dentist, or a doctor: it's a lot of blood, sweat and tears to get there and to stay there. Read A-Level units ahead before you start them, read magazines and articles on zoology in a research-context (Unis like that), and DON'T be complacent if the entry requirements are lower and aim for the best you'll be able to do. You will do Zoology, but Veterinary Science might be a stretch, even if your grades are higher than they expect.

I wish you the best of luck. If you want to do Zoology, you will.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 6
Original post by turbidite
I've struggled with anxiety, and my motivation has gone up and down which has affected my revision plans and has made me doubt myself a lot (check my post history on my profile if you want and you'll see what I mean, I'm still tackling A-Levels and its pretty stressful regardless if you take the three sciences or not).
Veterinary Science is still a long career and requires a lot of resilience - as in it'll get very stressful both in study and later on)), research alternative careers in zoology and have an early look at UCAS.com-- which has info on what you'll be doing in these fields and see if they're right for you. There's also a careers quiz to see what you might like based on how you're most comfortable working, and for some inspiration here's a undergraduate course on marine biology and zoology at Bangor that doesn't need biology or chemistry as sciences if you take perhaps Geography and Psychology (or maths if you're good at that). The avg. grades for accepted students there is BCC. However, its likely that they will want biology in some way to show interest in the subject. Their other Zoological courses, which may be closer to Veterinary Science --conservation or ornithology sound interesting-- require a C in Biology which is very feasible compared to the usual A, or more realistically the A* you might need to study Veterinary Science.
Most importantly, don't lose hope. If you really want to do something to do with Zoology, like you're dead-set on it, you will do it. You'll be able to find the passion to study consistently. The teachers who couldn't go over the syllabus in time, they're boring. You will get to work with animals in some way, but being a Veterinarian is like being a dentist, or a doctor: it's a lot of blood, sweat and tears to get there and to stay there. Read A-Level units ahead before you start them, read magazines and articles on zoology in a research-context (Unis like that), and DON'T be complacent if the entry requirements are lower and aim for the best you'll be able to do. You will do Zoology, but Veterinary Science might be a stretch, even if your grades are higher than they expect.
I wish you the best of luck. If you want to do Zoology, you will.


Thank U for this advice, I will really take it into consideration in what career path I should choose.
Original post by turbidite
I've struggled with anxiety, and my motivation has gone up and down which has affected my revision plans and has made me doubt myself a lot (check my post history on my profile if you want and you'll see what I mean, I'm still tackling A-Levels and its pretty stressful regardless if you take the three sciences or not).
Veterinary Science is still a long career and requires a lot of resilience - as in it'll get very stressful both in study and later on)), research alternative careers in zoology and have an early look at UCAS.com-- which has info on what you'll be doing in these fields and see if they're right for you. There's also a careers quiz to see what you might like based on how you're most comfortable working, and for some inspiration here's a undergraduate course on marine biology and zoology at Bangor that doesn't need biology or chemistry as sciences if you take perhaps Geography and Psychology (or maths if you're good at that). The avg. grades for accepted students there is BCC. However, its likely that they will want biology in some way to show interest in the subject. Their other Zoological courses, which may be closer to Veterinary Science --conservation or ornithology sound interesting-- require a C in Biology which is very feasible compared to the usual A, or more realistically the A* you might need to study Veterinary Science.
Most importantly, don't lose hope. If you really want to do something to do with Zoology, like you're dead-set on it, you will do it. You'll be able to find the passion to study consistently. The teachers who couldn't go over the syllabus in time, they're boring. You will get to work with animals in some way, but being a Veterinarian is like being a dentist, or a doctor: it's a lot of blood, sweat and tears to get there and to stay there. Read A-Level units ahead before you start them, read magazines and articles on zoology in a research-context (Unis like that), and DON'T be complacent if the entry requirements are lower and aim for the best you'll be able to do. You will do Zoology, but Veterinary Science might be a stretch, even if your grades are higher than they expect.
I wish you the best of luck. If you want to do Zoology, you will.

Also I advise going over the syllabus that you missed over the Summer. And take it easy. Literally, discern what is best for you well-being as you research possibilities.

(also I've been to Bangor campus and, although it isn't for me, its very noice).
Original post by Mimosns
Thank U for this advice, I will really take it into consideration in what career path I should choose.

Good luck, I really hope you'll get there!

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