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psychic_satori
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#61
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#61
(Original post by SamTheMan)
Smoked Meat
Bagels
Poutine
Maple Syrup
Aside from poutine, I think all of those foods existed way before Canada...
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psychic_satori
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#62
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#62
(Original post by SamTheMan)
You're right about it being dangerous but what's scary is more the fact that a lot of what's going on is fully visible: Drug traficking, shootings (when I was there, a nutter was walking down Ste Catherine's shooting his gun in the air. Luckily I was nowhere near when that happened).
Montreal is very exciting for its music and artistic scene. Many people have compared to the excitement around San Francisco in the 70s. The best thing about the city is that it's a well kept secret. People here have already heard the name "Montreal" once or twice but they haven't got a clue about it. But every Brit I've known who's gone has just loved it.
Well, Mtl may be a well-kept secret to Europeans, but in North America it's well known for it's....entertainment. Every year loads of students take their spring break there, because the drinking age in Canada is lower, and the guys like it because there's practically a strip club at every corner.
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SamTheMan
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#63
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#63
(Original post by psychic_satori)
Aside from poutine, I think all of those foods existed way before Canada...
Yeah saying Bagels are from Canada was a bit far-stretched. That and Smoked Meat is associated with the Jewish communities of Montreal and of course other Canadian and American cities.
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psychic_satori
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#64
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#64
(Original post by SamTheMan)
Yeah saying Bagels are from Canada was a bit far-stretched. That and Smoked Meat is associated with the Jewish communities of Montreal and of course other Canadian and American cities.
And people were making maple syrup throughout New England before anybody really spread west and north into what is now Canada.
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SamTheMan
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#65
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#65
(Original post by psychic_satori)
Well, Mtl may be a well-kept secret to Europeans, but in North America it's well known for it's....entertainment. Every year loads of students take their spring break there, because the drinking age in Canada is lower, and the guys like it because there's practically a strip club at every corner.
Yes I noticed a lot of New Englanders on New Year's Eve and during Spring Break. Most are there to drink, go to stripclubs and act very slutty. The number of friends (Canadian) I know who hooked up with young Americans in Montreal. It's a bit like Cancun, it's as if they think "Whatever happens in Montreal, stays in Montreal". It's quite scary.
Whenever I've been in Montreal, I've had a girlfriend. What's weird is those were the only moments I actually had a girlfriend.
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SamTheMan
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#66
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#66
(Original post by psychic_satori)
And people were making maple syrup throughout New England before anybody really spread west and north into what is now Canada.
Yes Vermont is also famous for its Maple Syrup but Canada has been around for longer than Vermont so you should look into that. I will do the same...
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psychic_satori
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#67
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#67
(Original post by SamTheMan)
Whenever I've been in Montreal, I've had a girlfriend. What's weird is those were the only moments I actually had a girlfriend.
the universe played a cruel joke on you, my friend!
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SamTheMan
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#68
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#68
(Original post by psychic_satori)
the universe played a cruel joke on you, my friend!
Tell me about it...
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psychic_satori
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#69
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#69
(Original post by SamTheMan)
Yes Vermont is also famous for its Maple Syrup but Canada has been around for longer than Vermont so you should look into that. I will do the same...
I'm sorry, I should have clarified that a bit more for you. The natives had maple syrup way before any Europeans settled in North America, so you can't really give a single location credit for the discovery.
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Apollo
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#70
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#70
(Original post by SamTheMan)
Yes Vermont is also famous for its Maple Syrup but Canada has been around for longer than Vermont so you should look into that. I will do the same...
Vermont almost joined canada a while back

*useless fact*
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SamTheMan
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#71
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#71
(Original post by psychic_satori)
I'm sorry, I should have clarified that a bit more for you. The natives had maple syrup way before any Europeans settled in North America, so you can't really give a single location credit for the discovery.
I know that maple syrup has been found for ages but the French colonials established more ties with the native population than the English ever did (the Mohawks being an exception. This is what I was taught in my History of Canada course). This explains why the French colonials discovered stuff like Lacrosse and Maple syrup and adopted it as their own.
But I guess saying that Canadians discovered Maple Syrup was an exaggeration of mine.
(Original post by PadFoot90)
Vermont almost joined canada a while back

*useless fact*
Recently or during the War of Independence? I know that Vermont has always been a Liberal and somewhat independent state. Plus, a strong minority are of French-Canadian descent.
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canuck
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#72
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Well, Lacross, Hockey and basketball are our home made sports.

of course, Lacross was invented by the native peoples. As for hockey, it was invented in Nova Scotia, a painting affirmed that this year. The French Canadians became very disappointed (conflict over who invented hockey.)

As for our some what loose relationship with Britain, 50% of the population is still of British ancestory. Hell, even my step father parents who are dutch still have high regard for the monarchy. Many of the provinces still have strong British roots, especailly in the provinces of British Columbia, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland. Ontario, Quebec and Alberta (in my oppinon) are a bit anti monarchist.

Well, I am one of those of British ancestory, a mixed batch of Black Irish, Scottish, English and Welsh. As for the many others, they are disapearing. Many of the baby boomers (over 70%) are of British ancestory. They are the last bit of string that keeps this country a constitutional monarchy. Hell, in my school alone, (just 15 teachers) 3 teachers are one of the 500,000 that immigrated between the 50's and 60's.

Sam the man, i suggest you visit the city of Victoria, it is as if you are in Britain, except you can see large mountains. The city has the double decker buses, the British flag flying next to the B.C. flag (my avatar) and a large part of the population speak British. Its home to the Canadain Scottish regiment (Sir Arthur Currie ring a bell?) and may British buildings, such as the empress hotel.

Canada is changing, as is the rest of the world. Hell, you can even say Britain is becoming less British by the day too.
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Eru Iluvatar
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#73
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#73
I dont hate any whole group of people, whoever they are.
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Sanna.M
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#74
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#74
i'm a pessimistic human!
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psychic_satori
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#75
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#75
(Original post by canuck)
Well, Lacross, Hockey and basketball are our home made sports.

of course, Lacross was invented by the native peoples. As for hockey, it was invented in Nova Scotia, a painting affirmed that this year. The French Canadians became very disappointed (conflict over who invented hockey.)
You can't really call a painting definitive evidence, though. I mean, inventing hockey equipment is one thing, but the game played in Nova Scotia was nothing like the hockey that we know today, because there were fewer players, and the rules were more like those of football (soccer) or rugby. I just don't see how any town or place can claim the "invention" of a sport that obviously evolved over time. It's no surprise that loads of Canadian towns jumped at the chance of claiming the creation of the beloved national pasttime.

Besides, if a painting is all the proof necessary, then it was invented in Virginia as it is 32 years older than the Nova Scotia picture.
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canuck
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#76
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#76
(Original post by psychic_satori)
You can't really call a painting definitive evidence, though. I mean, inventing hockey equipment is one thing, but the game played in Nova Scotia was nothing like the hockey that we know today, because there were fewer players, and the rules were more like those of football (soccer) or rugby. I just don't see how any town or place can claim the "invention" of a sport that obviously evolved over time. It's no surprise that loads of Canadian towns jumped at the chance of claiming the creation of the beloved national pasttime.

Besides, if a painting is all the proof necessary, then it was invented in Virginia as it is 32 years older than the Nova Scotia picture.

Well, if you read the article, is seems hockey's origen might have been in Europe. O well, we all know one thing for sure, the British Army created the first hockey tournament in 1902. As for who invented hockey, who cares, the world recognises we love it.
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kellywood_5
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#77
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#77
No, I don't hate Americans- I have no reason to. Besides, I don't see how anyone can say they hate everyone from a particular country. They may not like certain Americans, eg Bush, but that doesn't mean all Americans are the same.
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Apollo
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#78
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#78
(Original post by SamTheMan)
I know that maple syrup has been found for ages but the French colonials established more ties with the native population than the English ever did (the Mohawks being an exception. This is what I was taught in my History of Canada course). This explains why the French colonials discovered stuff like Lacrosse and Maple syrup and adopted it as their own.
But I guess saying that Canadians discovered Maple Syrup was an exaggeration of mine.


Recently or during the War of Independence? I know that Vermont has always been a Liberal and somewhat independent state. Plus, a strong minority are of French-Canadian descent.
Before we joined the states
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riotgrrrl
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#79
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#79
Isn't this a massive generlisation too big to comment on?
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sleepyeba
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#80
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#80
[QUOTE=SamTheMan]Canada has brought us (Canuck please tell me if I get some of these wrong):
Pamela Anderson
Mike Myers
John Candy
Lacrosse
Basketball (a Canadian created the sport when working at a US uni)
Smoked Meat
Bagels
Poutine
Maple Syrup
Leonard Cohen
Barenaked Ladies (sadly)
Rufus Wainwright
Tragically Hip
Nickleback (sadly)
Avril Lavigne (sadly)
Celine Dion (sadly)
A Simple Plan (sadly)
Atom Egoyan [QUOTE]

Apologies if this has already been brought up, but I can't bear to not mention these guys also being Canadian!!

Jim Carrey
Keanu Reeves
The Wonderbra is canadian I believe, as are Smarties and the tuck-in handles on 6-packs of beer.
oh, and baseball is actually canadian, not american :p:
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