state school messing up your life Watch

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annabellewalter
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#161
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#161
tecnik, its gonna be a long night for you isnt it?
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technik
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#162
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#162
(Original post by annabellewalter)
tecnik, its gonna be a long night for you isnt it?
whys that?

and why does everyone spell it wrong...only 7 letters for goodness sake!!
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Toy Soldier
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#163
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#163
(Original post by technik)
not always true...you can learn much from a library, or the internet, or go to the open university. they dont have entrance requirements on the whole AFAIK. they let my dad do his social science degree with his couple of "o-levels"
Meh, one of my computing teachers had an Open University degree in Geography. I spent the whole year being made to help people with their TrueBASIC, because the teacher didn't have a clue. She could barely turn on a computer. Lol... TrueBASIC... DWARFFFFF DOLLAR!!! Sorry, reminded me of a different computing teacher and a strange little program about snow white.
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annabellewalter
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#164
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#164
because im not looking at the keyboard, note no caps or punctuation! well apostrophes neway. I only sed the long night thing due to your calculations on rep. :p:
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technik
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#165
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#165
(Original post by annabellewalter)
because im not looking at the keyboard, note no caps or punctuation! well apostrophes neway. I only sed the long night thing due to your calculations on rep. :p:
heh nah...im just compounding TS's rage at his 1 point problem
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Toy Soldier
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#166
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#166
Though now I wonder who gave the neg rep... it took off a good 18 points. That would need some repping power, wouldn't it?
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technik
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#167
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#167
(Original post by Toy Soldier)
Though now I wonder who gave the neg rep... it took off a good 18 points. That would need some repping power, wouldn't it?
could be someone with the same amount of gems as you in theory.

it wasnt me though, my reps more powerful than that, and ive used mine already today
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annabellewalter
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#168
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#168
Well I have 62 so it couldn't/wouldn't have been me.
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technik
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#169
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#169
(Original post by annabellewalter)
Well I have 62 so it couldn't/wouldn't have been me.
think your neg rep is worth 1, maybe 2
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annabellewalter
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#170
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#170
I made a silly thread, and now the world hates me
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~Raphael~
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#171
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#171
hehe I never saw it but it was an interesting topic :eek:
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annabellewalter
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#172
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#172
you blats have seen it. I said that i was upset about getting uni rejections and i was shot down for being insensitive, ungrateful and arrogant. and im such a peaceful person.
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~Raphael~
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#173
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#173
oooooooooooooooooooooooh I thought you meant the poo thread
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annabellewalter
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#174
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#174
dont even start me on the poo thread. it wasnt around long enough for me to be neg repped. thank god.
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~Raphael~
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#175
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#175
lol would have been interesting to see responses :eek:
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annabellewalter
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#176
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#176
i saw a few. wasnt good.
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~Raphael~
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#177
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#177
did anyone actually answer the question?
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kellywood_5
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#178
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#178
I've been to a state school all my life and it certainly hasn't 'screwed me up' in any way. I went to a primary school that probably compares with the one described in the opening post. It was falling apart, I don't remember ever learning any science, technology, geography or art, we had about 3 ancient computers in the whole school and we had a PE lesson about once a term. There were people literally jumping out of the windows and putting pencils on the chairs so people would sit on them. Unsurprisingly, only 2 pupils, me and my best friend, actually bothered sitting the 11+, and the school gave us no help at all, not even a single practice paper. This compares with one of the best prmary schools in my area, where they actually had preparation lessons with the headteacher once a week. I passed and my best friend didn't, but we both ended up at the same comprehensive anyway because my parents didn't want me to go to a grammar school and neither did I really.

My secondary school was a lot better. A lot of my KS3 teachers were rubbish, but all my GCSE and AS teachers have been good, some excellent. The only thing I would complain about is that I was forced to sit quite a few non-academic subjects at GCSE, whereas I would have preferred to do all academic. I was still really pleased with my results though, and I'm happy with my AS-levels so far as well. For my year, the GCSE pass rate (5 A*-C) was 46%, only 9% behind the local private school which is also selective. The teachers are all more than willing to give you help and advice if you ask for it. I've never regretted my decision to go to this school. Oh, and some people were talking about large class sizes at state school; my sixth form is so small that I'm in much smaller classes than I would have been if I'd switched to a grammar school, maybe even a private school. My biggest class has about 17 of us, then 12, then 5 and 5.

I admit I have seen a lot of people, both at my primary and secondary schools, who've ended up like your friends, but it has a lot more to do with the individual and their parents than the school. My parents have always been really supportive of my education. They always take an interest in how I'm getting on, read my reports, go to parents' evenings, buy me any books and stationery I need etc etc, and they've never put any pressure on me when it comes to grades. That's had a big impact on me doing as well as I have. When it comes to applying to uni, my school had 70% of Year 13s applying last year and all of them got offers. One girl has been accepted to Cambridge this year. However, because there's not such an emphasis on grades, the teachers encourage you to do what you want, where you want. They don't pressure you to apply to a top uni if you don't want to just because it makes the school look good.
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parsimony
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#179
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#179
I have been to 6different school in my life..all of them apart from my recent school were public schools..i just loved them.. in fact..i think they are much harder than private schools because teachers dont care if u understand or not..if you want to have good grades you have to work a lot..
but in a private school?? teachers are sooo willing to help you...my grades were never perfect but they are much better in this private school than they have ever been before!

so i guess it depends on your attitude (and also on the attitude of your parents) what you will turn in to...
you can become a criminal even though you have a private school and you can be a briliant student and go to a very good Uni even though you have "only" a public school education..

a think that such a broad generalisation..that states that public schools will mess up your life is wrong..
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mobb_theprequel
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#180
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#180
(Original post by LondonBoy)
Today I met with friends from my primary school, which was a state school, not a very good one either. Out of around 24 kids i was the only one who went on to a private secondary school, my parents sacrificied alot at the time.

Anyways from my old school mates, today i saw/heard that 4 or 5 had been chucked out of their state schools, dropped out of school after gcses. 2 have criminal records and have just come out of 'Feltham Young Offenders' none of them had done well in their gcses etc

Its really made me think, would I have turned out like this if i had not gone to private school.
before i recieve a herd of neg reps, this isnt an attack on state schools, but something i was thinking about.
My state primary school wasn't particularly great either, although in fairness it was a lot better (comparably) than the state secondary schools nearby. There were only 210 people at my primary school (one form intake) - my class(/year) was divided into five 'ability tables' of six people: 2 tables were for people with Special Educational Needs, 2 tables were for people of average ability, and one table housed the people who expected to go to grammar school. Lessons were primarily geared towards the low ability majority - and although this is understandable, it meant that the high/median ability people were neglected. The school also did nothing to help with the 11+, as the Headteacher was opposed to grammar schools. Most of the lessons for the high ability table were spent playing on the computer, or teaching ourselves maths from textbooks - with minimal teacher assistance.

When the crossroads of secondary education reared its ugly head at the end of Year 6 - virtually everybody went to the local comps, with 6 people going on to grammar schools. At the time (and probably still today) the state schools in Birmingham, especially for boys, were crap. This was tempered, to an extent, by the presence of some of the best grammar schools in the country. However, for most of my classmates, the post-Primary school reality was attending a mediocre/crap state secondary school. The six people from my primary school who went on to grammar school have achieved excellent grades - and all of them are going to decent universites. A clutch of the people who went to the local comps did well, too. Sadly though, an alarming proportion of my primary school class have dropped out.

One of my best friends at primary school (who wasn't a stupid guy by any means) managed to get expelled from three secondary schools. And has subsequently been arrested, charged and imprisoned for dealing crack cocaine. :eek: A small number of people have developed serious hard drug dependencies; and I know of two girls who now have kids of their own (one of them is married, too). And these are just the people I know/have been told about. Two people from my primary school went to state secondary schools initially, but were pulled out by their parents - and made to attend independent schools. They have also done very well academically.

I'm not trying to make out that state comprehensives are rubbish - but it's obvious that there's significant variation in the quality of schools, according to area. My area had a preponderance of crap comprehensives, and this problem was, perhaps, made even more acute by the existence of a strong grammar school tradition.
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