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trouttrout
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#1
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What does 'in vivo' and 'in vitro' mean?

I've been at Uni for one and a half years now, and still don't know what it means when I read it. Haven't asked the lecturers as probably a stupid question at the level of my education!
Have asked other people, but they don't seem to know what It means either!
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MadNatSci
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I've always thought in vivo means actually in the living cell. In vitro literally means 'in glass' so it means carried out in a test tube etc. Basically if it's done in vitro it's not in the normal natural environment and they've isolated the reactions they want to study (which means things often happen differently to the way they would happen in cells).

Might be wrong though :s:
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Mimo
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(Original post by trouttrout)
What does 'in vivo' and 'in vitro' mean?

I've been at Uni for one and a half years now, and still don't know what it means when I read it. Haven't asked the lecturers as probably a stupid question at the level of my education!
Have asked other people, but they don't seem to know what It means either!
I think....
In vitro means in a glass, e.g in lab, as opposed to in vivo, which means in the living world.
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oxymoron
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According to dictionary.com:

In vitro: outside the living body and in an artificial environment

In vivo: Within a living organism:
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