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-=flyboy=-
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#1
Report Thread starter 17 years ago
#1
Hi all,
Was reading a thread last night concerning becoming an RAF Fighter Pilot and the response was incredible. I also replid to it and noticed that several professional pilots had added comments.

I am not set on becoming a fighter pilot, I am aiming for the commercial industry and would like to find out as much as possible about getting there. At the moment I am flying gliders at a local club and absorbing information from pilots there. I am also in my final year of A-levels (English, Maths and Physics) and I am hoping to go to University next year to do Aeronautical Systems Engineering. If anyone can offer me advice on interviews for airlines, how to go about getting a job after doing my degree etc, I would be greatly appreciative!

I am also on Messenger so if anyone wants to talk my address is:

[email protected]

Thanks very much

David Colgate
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#2
Report 17 years ago
#2
Hi David

The commercial world is a difficult one to break into. Advice for interviews with airlines isn't hard to come by (check out the "Wannabes" forum on www.pprune.org, for example), the hardest thing is getting an interview in the first place.

The problem you'll face is that the commercial flying world is quite crowded. There are a lot of guys out there with CPLs and ATPLs (Commercial Pilots Licences and Air Transport Pilots Licences; you need an ATPL to fly for an airline) who aren't working. Airlines tend to advertise for and interview pilots who already have an ATPL and a couple of hundered hours on something like 737s or A300s. If they took someone with no flying experience, they'd need to train them up; the cost of putting someone through a PPL, then a night rating, instrument rating, CPL then ATPL is incredible; probably in the region of £40 000.

There are some rare sponsorship schemes where airlines take a few candidates a year and train them in this way, but in return you have to agree to fly for them for some years afterwards, and you're not paid very much for the first few years while you repay them for training you.

The easiest way into the airline world seems to be to gain experience. The more qualifications you have, the more attractive you are to an employer. You'll need to pay your way to a PPL, night/IR rating, and CPL before you're likely to get any interest, and even then most adverts will specify a minimum of 1000 hours and a frozen ATPL at least.

Good luck; drop me a line if you want any more advice.

[email protected]
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Mark_KK
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#3
Report 17 years ago
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(Original post by -=flyboy=-)
Hi all,
Was reading a thread last night concerning becoming an RAF Fighter Pilot and the response was incredible. I also replid to it and noticed that several professional pilots had added comments.

I am not set on becoming a fighter pilot, I am aiming for the commercial industry and would like to find out as much as possible about getting there. At the moment I am flying gliders at a local club and absorbing information from pilots there. I am also in my final year of A-levels (English, Maths and Physics) and I am hoping to go to University next year to do Aeronautical Systems Engineering. If anyone can offer me advice on interviews for airlines, how to go about getting a job after doing my degree etc, I would be greatly appreciative!

I am also on Messenger so if anyone wants to talk my address is:

[email protected]

Thanks very much

David Colgate
The airline industry is currently in turmoil and subsequently the number of pilot vacancies relative to the number of qualified out of work pilots is not really in favour of new people starting out.

Unless you are prepeared to spend 50 thousand pounds on training I suggest trying to get onto a pilot training scheme (as described by a previous poster) with a major airline.l

The only problems are as follows:

1. These schemes are vastly over-subscribed (hundreds of applicants per one place no doubt).

2. The downturn in the aviation industry means that most airlines have suspended offering the schemes. I contacted BA about what they offered and they said it was suspended pending review in 2004.

Basically to sum it all up:

Don't hold out much hope. At least not until the aiviation industry picks up.
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