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    wto jobs could do if i took history or classics, french, biology and pe at a level and has any1 taken pe a level, if so wots it like?
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    The A-levels you mention are all well-respected (apart from, perhaps, PE) but I don't think that they really lead into specific jobs. That isn't a bad thing, not many A-levels do, and most jobs would require training anyway after A-levels. Are you planning on going to uni?
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    (Original post by Alexander)
    The A-levels you mention are all well-respected (apart from, perhaps, PE) but I don't think that they really lead into specific jobs. That isn't a bad thing, not many A-levels do, and most jobs would require training anyway after A-levels. Are you planning on going to uni?
    I do latin A-level, and as my teacher regularly reminds me, classics, and the skills involved are highly valued in the workplace by employers. it also shows you are cultured, as does french, and it is a very academic subject.
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    (Original post by theone)
    I do latin A-level, and as my teacher regularly reminds me, classics, and the skills involved are highly valued in the workplace by employers.
    Yeah. You could become a classics teacher.
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    (Original post by Toffee)
    Yeah. You could become a classics teacher.
    You could indeed -- or many other things.
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    (Original post by Toffee)
    Yeah. You could become a classics teacher.


    I don't do classics for all of the benefits, although I think it's a subject which requires a great deal of thought and intelligence. However, I could never take it at university.
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    The discussion is interesting, but I think the OP may be talking about Class. Civ. as opposed to the languages Latin and Greek. Apologies if I'm wrong though.

    I have applied to do Classics at uni, it's at least as useful (or useless, depending on how you look at it) as any other Arts degree, and Classics grads go into a pretty wide variety of careers.
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    (Original post by Alexander)
    The discussion is interesting, but I think the OP may be talking about Class. Civ. as opposed to the languages Latin and Greek. Apologies if I'm wrong though.

    I have applied to do Classics at uni, it's at least as useful (or useless, depending on how you look at it) as any other Arts degree, and Classics grads go into a pretty wide variety of careers.

    I agree, but the thought of doing progressively harder unseens eahc week for 3 more years ain't something that appeals to me! They're hard enough as it is.
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    (Original post by Alexander)
    The discussion is interesting, but I think the OP may be talking about Class. Civ. as opposed to the languages Latin and Greek. Apologies if I'm wrong though.

    I have applied to do Classics at uni, it's at least as useful (or useless, depending on how you look at it) as any other Arts degree, and Classics grads go into a pretty wide variety of careers.
    And it's probably the easiest way of getting into Oxbridge
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    And it's probably the easiest way of getting into Oxbridge
    Really?
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    (Original post by Toffee)
    Really?
    Yep, the success rate is around 65%.
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    I still do have a great amount of respect for 'traditional academic' qualifications, this is a view shared by many people. However, in all honesty, the myth that employers drool over classics and history is....
    well, those day's are now long gone. If you are ONLY looking at employment prospects (nothing else) classics at Oxford simply cannot compare with Accounting/Finance/Economics and the like. It's a trying time for the economy, probably not a good idea taking for granted that an overly academic degree (even at Oxbridge) is going to offer you a passport into highly paid jobs.

    J.S.
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    (Original post by J.S.)
    I still do have a great amount of respect for 'traditional academic' qualifications, this is a view shared by many people. However, in all honesty, the myth that employers drool over classics and history is....
    well, those day's are now long gone. If you are ONLY looking at employment prospects (nothing else) classics at Oxford simply cannot compare with Accounting/Finance/Economics and the like. It's a trying time for the economy, probably not a good idea taking for granted that an overly academic degree (even at Oxbridge) is going to offer you a passport into highly paid jobs.

    J.S.
    I think History is a good way into the Civil Service. Though it is true that the civil service does not always pay well.
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    I think History is a good way into the Civil Service. Though it is true that the civil service does not always pay well.
    With the Civil service it doesn't particularly matter as to what you study, just as long as you can handle their (rather difficult) exams. Incidentally someone with numerical and lit. skills will be best positioned to be able to do so.
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    (Original post by J.S.)
    With the Civil service it doesn't particularly matter as to what you study, just as long as you can handle their (rather difficult) exams. Incidentally someone with numerical and lit. skills will be best positioned to be able to do so.
    True, however it seems the civil service is the favourate route of many history grads.

    (Original post by Alexander)

    I have applied to do Classics at uni, it's at least as useful (or useless, depending on how you look at it) as any other Arts degree, and Classics grads go into a pretty wide variety of careers.
    what kind of careers can u go into with a classics degree? i can only think of 2:
    museum work
    teaching
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    what kind of careers can u go into with a classics degree? i can only think of 2:
    museum work
    teaching
    law (after conversion)
    accountancy exams
    civil service
    middle management

    basically and graduatejob/qualification.

    Provided you can find one.

    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    law (after conversion)
    accountancy exams
    civil service
    middle management

    basically and graduatejob/qualification.

    Provided you can find one.
    An absolutely crap list Lord Huntroyde

    You might as well do a:

    Law degree
    Accountancy Degree
    Management Degree

    A Classics degree doesn't 'put' you into any career. Which may or may not be a good thing, depending on what your interests are and how sure you are of any possible careers you want to do. It does however show that you are an artisic, creative person who can write essays and is a good linguist.
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    (Original post by Unregistered)
    An absolutely crap list Lord Huntroyde

    You might as well do a:

    Law degree
    Accountancy Degree
    Management Degree

    A Classics degree doesn't 'put' you into any career. Which may or may not be a good thing, depending on what your interests are and how sure you are of any possible careers you want to do. It does however show that you are an artisic, creative person who can write essays and is a good linguist.
    Actually classics graduates are the most employable, with 94% of them having a job 6 months or less after leaving uni.

    (Original post by theone)
    Actually classics graduates are the most employable, with 94% of them having a job 6 months or less after leaving uni.
    I didnt say they werent employable, I was just making a mockery of Lord Whatshisnames 'list' of possible careers for a classics postgrad - as they were all post graduate training programmes that any graduate could do!

    That Lord preaches like he's about 20, but really he hasnt even done his GCSEs yet.
 
 
 
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